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  • How Google Earth images could help save Amazonian tribes

    Futurity
    Jeff Sossamon-U. Missouri
    23 Apr 2014 | 9:36 am
    Monitoring the populations of “uncontacted” tribes via Google Earth satellite images may be a noninvasive way help insure the survival of indigenous Brazilian villages. Lowland South America, including the Amazon Basin, harbors most of the last indigenous societies that have limited contact with the outside world. Studying these tribes, located deep within Amazonian rainforests, gives scientists a glimpse at what tribal cultures may have been like before the arrival of Europeans. Related Articles On FuturityEmory UniversityRacial quotas for college put to test in BrazilStanford…
  • Antarctica was once as warm as California

    Futurity » Earth & Environment
    Eric Gershon-Yale
    22 Apr 2014 | 10:32 am
    Parts of ancient Antarctica were as toasty as today’s California coast, say scientists who used a new method to measure past temperatures. The study focused on Antarctica during the Eocene epoch, 40 to 50 million years ago, a period with high concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and consequently a greenhouse climate. Today, Antarctica is, year-round, one of the coldest places on Earth, and the continent’s interior is the coldest place, with annual average land temperatures far below zero degrees Fahrenheit. Related Articles On FuturityCornell UniversityDancing with high-temp…
  • Alcohol brands in songs may encourage teens to binge

    Futurity » Health & Medicine
    Allison Hydzik-Pittsburgh
    23 Apr 2014 | 8:58 am
    Binge drinking by teenagers and young adults is strongly associated with liking, owning, and correctly identifying music that references alcohol by brand name. Based on a national, randomized survey of more than 2,500 people ages 15 to 23, the findings suggest that policy and educational interventions designed to limit the influence of alcohol-brand references in popular music could be important in reducing alcohol consumption in teens and young adults. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of Southern CaliforniaTeens in the 'in crowd' more likely to smokeUniversity of MelbourneIn US,…
  • Nanoreporters go underground to check oil for sulfur

    Futurity » Science & Technology
    Mike Williams-Rice
    23 Apr 2014 | 8:51 am
    Chemists have created nanoparticles that can sample crude oil and natural gas for hydrogen sulfide before pumping. Crude oil and natural gas inherently contain hydrogen sulfide, which gives off a “rotten egg” smell. Even a 1 percent trace of sulfur turns oil into what’s known as “sour crude,” which is toxic and corrodes pipelines and transportation vessels, says James Tour, a chemist at Rice University. The extra steps required to turn the sour into “sweet” crude are costly. “So it’s important to know the content of what you’re…
  • How Google Earth images could help save Amazonian tribes

    Futurity » Society & Culture
    Jeff Sossamon-U. Missouri
    23 Apr 2014 | 9:36 am
    Monitoring the populations of “uncontacted” tribes via Google Earth satellite images may be a noninvasive way help insure the survival of indigenous Brazilian villages. Lowland South America, including the Amazon Basin, harbors most of the last indigenous societies that have limited contact with the outside world. Studying these tribes, located deep within Amazonian rainforests, gives scientists a glimpse at what tribal cultures may have been like before the arrival of Europeans. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of California, Santa BarbaraRancher mindset key to saving…
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    Futurity

  • How Google Earth images could help save Amazonian tribes

    Jeff Sossamon-U. Missouri
    23 Apr 2014 | 9:36 am
    Monitoring the populations of “uncontacted” tribes via Google Earth satellite images may be a noninvasive way help insure the survival of indigenous Brazilian villages. Lowland South America, including the Amazon Basin, harbors most of the last indigenous societies that have limited contact with the outside world. Studying these tribes, located deep within Amazonian rainforests, gives scientists a glimpse at what tribal cultures may have been like before the arrival of Europeans. Related Articles On FuturityEmory UniversityRacial quotas for college put to test in BrazilStanford…
  • Alcohol brands in songs may encourage teens to binge

    Allison Hydzik-Pittsburgh
    23 Apr 2014 | 8:58 am
    Binge drinking by teenagers and young adults is strongly associated with liking, owning, and correctly identifying music that references alcohol by brand name. Based on a national, randomized survey of more than 2,500 people ages 15 to 23, the findings suggest that policy and educational interventions designed to limit the influence of alcohol-brand references in popular music could be important in reducing alcohol consumption in teens and young adults. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of FloridaHookah smoking hikes CO levelsUniversity of California, BerkeleyUS majority says ‘Do Not…
  • Nanoreporters go underground to check oil for sulfur

    Mike Williams-Rice
    23 Apr 2014 | 8:51 am
    Chemists have created nanoparticles that can sample crude oil and natural gas for hydrogen sulfide before pumping. Crude oil and natural gas inherently contain hydrogen sulfide, which gives off a “rotten egg” smell. Even a 1 percent trace of sulfur turns oil into what’s known as “sour crude,” which is toxic and corrodes pipelines and transportation vessels, says James Tour, a chemist at Rice University. The extra steps required to turn the sour into “sweet” crude are costly. “So it’s important to know the content of what you’re…
  • Touch lets babies pick out words to learn

    Amy Patterson Neubert-Purdue
    23 Apr 2014 | 8:09 am
    Tickling a baby’s toes may be cute, but it’s also possible that those touches could help babies learn the words in their language. New research shows that a caregiver’s touch could help babies to find words in the continuous stream of speech. “We found that infants treat touches as if they are related to what they hear and thus these touches could have an impact on their word learning,” says Amanda Seidl, an associate professor of speech, language, and hearing sciences at Purdue University who studies language acquisition. Related Articles On FuturityMichigan…
  • Can boosting retromers keep Alzheimer’s at bay?

    Leah Burrows-Brandeis
    23 Apr 2014 | 7:13 am
    Cellular processes are not perfect. Sometimes, the by-products of their mistakes are harmless. Other times, they can lead to disease or even death. With Alzheimer’s disease, the mistake occurs when a protein called amyloid precursor protein (APP) in a neuron’s membrane gets cut in the wrong place, leading to a buildup of abnormal fragments called amyloid-beta. These fragments clump together to form a plaque around neurons, eventually interfering with brain function. Related Articles On FuturityDuke UniversityCan mice learn to change their tune?University at BuffaloPulses of light…
 
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    Futurity » Earth & Environment

  • Antarctica was once as warm as California

    Eric Gershon-Yale
    22 Apr 2014 | 10:32 am
    Parts of ancient Antarctica were as toasty as today’s California coast, say scientists who used a new method to measure past temperatures. The study focused on Antarctica during the Eocene epoch, 40 to 50 million years ago, a period with high concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and consequently a greenhouse climate. Today, Antarctica is, year-round, one of the coldest places on Earth, and the continent’s interior is the coldest place, with annual average land temperatures far below zero degrees Fahrenheit. Related Articles On FuturityCornell UniversityDancing with high-temp…
  • Asia’s air pollution makes Pacific storms stronger

    Keith Randall-Texas A&M
    22 Apr 2014 | 9:48 am
    Scientists compared air pollution rates from 1850 and from 2000 and found that man-made particles from Asia affect the Pacific storm track and ultimately weather around the world. “There appears to be little doubt that these particles from Asia affect storms sweeping across the Pacific and subsequently the weather patterns in North America and the rest of the world,” says Renyi Zhang of Texas A&M University and one of the authors of the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of MarylandMicrobes flipped…
  • Millions of years ago, Greenland was actually green

    Julie Cohen-UC Santa Barbara
    22 Apr 2014 | 8:53 am
    A team of scientists has discovered a 3-million-year-old landscape beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet. Glaciers are commonly thought to work like belt sanders. As they move over land, they scrape off everything—vegetation, soil, and even the top layer of bedrock. So scientists were surprised to discover an ancient tundra landscape preserved two miles below the Greenland Ice Sheet. Their findings appear in the journal Science. The team found organic soil that has been frozen to the bottom of the ice sheet for 2.7 million years. “The ancient soil under the Greenland Ice Sheet helps to…
  • Growth spurts over millions of years formed Andes

    Peter Iglinski-Rochester
    22 Apr 2014 | 8:19 am
    The Altiplano plateau in the central Andes—and most likely the entire mountain range—was formed through a series of rapid growth spurts, rather than a continuous gradual uplift, new research shows. “This study provides increasing evidence that the plateau formed through periodic rapid pulses, not through a continuous, gradual uplift of the surface, as was traditionally thought,” says Carmala Garzione, professor of Earth and environmental sciences at the University of Rochester. “In geologic terms, rapid means rising one kilometer or more over several millions of years,…
  • ‘Forensic genomics’ solves dead abalone mystery

    Kat Kerlin-UC Davis
    21 Apr 2014 | 12:31 pm
    Thousands of dead red abalone that washed up on the beaches of Sonoma County in Northern California in 2011 were the victims of a harmful algal bloom, according to a type of crime scene investigation that combines field surveys, toxin testing, and genomic scans. The method, dubbed “forensic genomics,” could have a profound effect on how wildlife mortality events are investigated in the future, researchers say. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of FloridaStarved algae cells make more fat for biofuelUniversity of California, BerkeleyClimate puts the squeeze on bird, squirrel…
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    Futurity » Health & Medicine

  • Alcohol brands in songs may encourage teens to binge

    Allison Hydzik-Pittsburgh
    23 Apr 2014 | 8:58 am
    Binge drinking by teenagers and young adults is strongly associated with liking, owning, and correctly identifying music that references alcohol by brand name. Based on a national, randomized survey of more than 2,500 people ages 15 to 23, the findings suggest that policy and educational interventions designed to limit the influence of alcohol-brand references in popular music could be important in reducing alcohol consumption in teens and young adults. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of Southern CaliforniaTeens in the 'in crowd' more likely to smokeUniversity of MelbourneIn US,…
  • Can boosting retromers keep Alzheimer’s at bay?

    Leah Burrows-Brandeis
    23 Apr 2014 | 7:13 am
    Cellular processes are not perfect. Sometimes, the by-products of their mistakes are harmless. Other times, they can lead to disease or even death. With Alzheimer’s disease, the mistake occurs when a protein called amyloid precursor protein (APP) in a neuron’s membrane gets cut in the wrong place, leading to a buildup of abnormal fragments called amyloid-beta. These fragments clump together to form a plaque around neurons, eventually interfering with brain function. Related Articles On FuturityWashington University in St. LouisStudent athletes need break from classes after…
  • Team invents probes to watch neurons fire in real time

    Amy Adams-Stanford
    23 Apr 2014 | 7:04 am
    Two new tools are letting scientists see brain activity as it happens live. The probes involve proteins that light up as an electric current sweeps down the long tendrils that link nerves together. The scientists can insert these proteins into a specific group of brain cells that they want to study—say, cells in the part of the brain involved in memory, or cells that specifically inhibit other neurons from firing—and then watch those cells as they communicate. “You want to know which neurons are firing, how they link together, and how they represent information,” says Michael…
  • Computer model reveals Essure’s pregnancy risk

    Phyllis Brown-UC Davis
    23 Apr 2014 | 6:17 am
    The risk of pregnancy among women using a newer method of planned sterilization called hysteroscopic sterilization is more than 10 times greater over a 10-year period than using the more commonly performed laparoscopic sterilization, a study shows. Published online today in the medical journal Contraception, the study found the higher risk of pregnancy with a newer sterilization method marketed under the brand name Essure. “This study provides essential information for women and their doctors discussing permanent sterilization,” says lead study author Aileen Gariepy, assistant…
  • ‘Molecular tweezer’ wards off protein clumping

    Layne Cameron-Michigan State
    22 Apr 2014 | 2:46 pm
    A small “molecular tweezer” keeps proteins from aggregating, which is often the first step in neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. The most effective way to tackle debilitating diseases is to punch them at the start and keep them from growing, researchers say. The new findings may push the molecule toward clinical trials and a new drug, says Lisa Lapidus, associate professor of physics and astronomy at Michigan State University. Related Articles On FuturityDuke UniversityWhy blunting emotion can save…
 
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    Futurity » Science & Technology

  • Nanoreporters go underground to check oil for sulfur

    Mike Williams-Rice
    23 Apr 2014 | 8:51 am
    Chemists have created nanoparticles that can sample crude oil and natural gas for hydrogen sulfide before pumping. Crude oil and natural gas inherently contain hydrogen sulfide, which gives off a “rotten egg” smell. Even a 1 percent trace of sulfur turns oil into what’s known as “sour crude,” which is toxic and corrodes pipelines and transportation vessels, says James Tour, a chemist at Rice University. The extra steps required to turn the sour into “sweet” crude are costly. “So it’s important to know the content of what you’re…
  • Touch lets babies pick out words to learn

    Amy Patterson Neubert-Purdue
    23 Apr 2014 | 8:09 am
    Tickling a baby’s toes may be cute, but it’s also possible that those touches could help babies learn the words in their language. New research shows that a caregiver’s touch could help babies to find words in the continuous stream of speech. “We found that infants treat touches as if they are related to what they hear and thus these touches could have an impact on their word learning,” says Amanda Seidl, an associate professor of speech, language, and hearing sciences at Purdue University who studies language acquisition. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity…
  • ‘Upside-down planet’ turns out to be self-lensing stars

    Peter Kelley-U. Washington
    23 Apr 2014 | 7:08 am
    Astronomers have discovered the first “self-lensing” binary star system. Like so many interesting discoveries, they say this one happened largely by accident. Astronomers detect planets too far away for direct observation by the dimming in light when a world passes in front of, or transits, its host star. Researchers were looking for transits others might have missed in data from the planet-hunting Kepler Space Telescope when they saw something in the binary star system KOI-3278 that didn’t make sense. “I found what essentially looked like an upside-down planet,”…
  • Team invents probes to watch neurons fire in real time

    Amy Adams-Stanford
    23 Apr 2014 | 7:04 am
    Two new tools are letting scientists see brain activity as it happens live. The probes involve proteins that light up as an electric current sweeps down the long tendrils that link nerves together. The scientists can insert these proteins into a specific group of brain cells that they want to study—say, cells in the part of the brain involved in memory, or cells that specifically inhibit other neurons from firing—and then watch those cells as they communicate. “You want to know which neurons are firing, how they link together, and how they represent information,” says Michael…
  • Male black widow spiders pick fatter virgin mates

    Don Campbell-Toronto
    23 Apr 2014 | 6:15 am
    New research shows that male black widow spiders prefer their female mates to be well-fed virgins—a rare example of mate preference by male spiders. In both controlled field studies and the wild, a new study shows that males overwhelmingly chose to mate with well-fed, unmated females. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of PittsburghMetal pollution puts bumblebees at riskUniversity of PennsylvaniaFriendly baboons often outlive 'loners'Vanderbilt UniversityOne sniff snuffs out bevy of bugsTexas A&M UniversityFear relapse: Why phobias are hard to curePenn StateBump in ozone bewilders…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Society & Culture

  • How Google Earth images could help save Amazonian tribes

    Jeff Sossamon-U. Missouri
    23 Apr 2014 | 9:36 am
    Monitoring the populations of “uncontacted” tribes via Google Earth satellite images may be a noninvasive way help insure the survival of indigenous Brazilian villages. Lowland South America, including the Amazon Basin, harbors most of the last indigenous societies that have limited contact with the outside world. Studying these tribes, located deep within Amazonian rainforests, gives scientists a glimpse at what tribal cultures may have been like before the arrival of Europeans. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of California, Santa BarbaraRancher mindset key to saving…
  • Alcohol brands in songs may encourage teens to binge

    Allison Hydzik-Pittsburgh
    23 Apr 2014 | 8:58 am
    Binge drinking by teenagers and young adults is strongly associated with liking, owning, and correctly identifying music that references alcohol by brand name. Based on a national, randomized survey of more than 2,500 people ages 15 to 23, the findings suggest that policy and educational interventions designed to limit the influence of alcohol-brand references in popular music could be important in reducing alcohol consumption in teens and young adults. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of PennsylvaniaHow wine got to France 2500 years agoMichigan State University‘Sweetheart’ freebies…
  • Using the internet can fight senior depression

    Tom Oswald-Michigan State
    18 Apr 2014 | 7:34 am
    As many as 10 million older Americans suffer from depression, often brought on by feelings of loneliness and isolation, but using the internet can reduce those chances by more than 30 percent. “That’s a very strong effect,” says Shelia Cotten, professor of telecommunication, information studies, and media at Michigan State University. “And it all has to do with older persons being able to communicate, to stay in contact with their social networks, and just not feel lonely.” Related Articles On FuturityRich or poor, teens feel better on par with peersBoston…
  • Wearing a new gadget may make you seem like a leader

    Jim Patterson-Vanderbilt
    18 Apr 2014 | 7:25 am
    If you’re in business and want to be perceived as a leader, wearing the newest tech tool, such as Google Glass, may help your image. Tech-savvy women benefit most, the research suggests. “Familiarity with and usage of new high-tech products appears to be a common manifestation of innovative behavior,” say Steve Hoeffler, associate professor of marketing at Owen Graduate School of Management at Vanderbilt University, and Stacy Wood, professor of marketing at Poole College of Management at North Carolina State College. Related Articles On FuturityMichigan State…
  • Toddlers have ‘an ear’ for accents

    Dominic Ali-Toronto
    17 Apr 2014 | 12:16 pm
    By two years of age, children are remarkably good at comprehending speakers who talk with regional accents that the toddlers have never heard before. Even more striking, say researchers, children as young as 15 months who have difficulty comprehending accents they’ve never heard before can quickly learn to understand accented speech after hearing the speaker for a short time. Related Articles On FuturityEmory UniversityMonkey recall mirrors humansDiversity more than doubles learningUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillHead Start narrows academic gap for Latino kidsMichigan State…
 
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