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  • Lasers show how Sea Monkeys mix oceans

    Futurity
    Marcus Woo-Caltech
    30 Sep 2014 | 12:13 pm
    Even though each “Sea Monkey” is only about half an inch long with 10 tiny, leaf-like fins, they can collectively generate a surprising amount of force. It turns out that the collective swimming motion of Sea Monkeys (brine shrimp) and other zooplankton—swimming plankton—can generate enough swirling flow to potentially influence the circulation of water in oceans, according to a new study. The effect could be as strong as those due to the wind and tides, the main factors that are known to drive the up-and-down mixing of oceans, says John Dabiri, professor of aeronautics and…
  • Climate change linked to California drought disaster

    Futurity » Earth and Environment
    Ker Than-Stanford
    30 Sep 2014 | 7:52 am
    Scientists say there’s a link between California’s severe drought and global warming. Noah Diffenbaugh, a climate scientist at Stanford University, used a novel combination of computer simulations and statistical techniques to show that a persistent region of high atmospheric pressure hovering over the Pacific Ocean that diverted storms away from California was much more likely to form in the presence of modern greenhouse gas concentrations. The research, published as a supplement to this month’s issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, is one of the…
  • 5 genes help protect people from severe malaria

    Futurity » Health and Medicine
    Liz Banks-Anderson-Melbourne
    30 Sep 2014 | 11:56 am
    Scientists analyzed 27 malaria resistance genes and found that five significantly determine how susceptible a person is to severe malaria. The findings could allow researchers to identify new therapeutics or vaccines to fight the disease. For the study, published in Nature Genetics, researchers collected data on 11,890 cases of severe malaria across 12 locations in Africa, Asia, and Oceania, where access to health resources to treat the disease can be difficult. Severe malaria is comprised of a number of life-threatening complications after infection with the malaria parasite. Related…
  • Lasers show how Sea Monkeys mix oceans

    Futurity » Science and Technology
    Marcus Woo-Caltech
    30 Sep 2014 | 12:13 pm
    Even though each “Sea Monkey” is only about half an inch long with 10 tiny, leaf-like fins, they can collectively generate a surprising amount of force. It turns out that the collective swimming motion of Sea Monkeys (brine shrimp) and other zooplankton—swimming plankton—can generate enough swirling flow to potentially influence the circulation of water in oceans, according to a new study. The effect could be as strong as those due to the wind and tides, the main factors that are known to drive the up-and-down mixing of oceans, says John Dabiri, professor of aeronautics and…
  • Belief in alien life varies widely by religion

    Futurity » Society and Culture
    David Salisbury-VU
    30 Sep 2014 | 6:56 am
    A new book by David Weintraub, an astronomy professor at Vanderbilt University, takes a closer look at what the world’s major religions have to say about extraterrestrial life. “When I did a library search, I found only half a dozen books and they were all written about the question of extraterrestrial life and Christianity, and mostly about Roman Catholicism, so I decided to take a broader look,” Weintraub says. The book, Religions and Extraterrestrial Life, describes what religious leaders and theologians have to say about extraterrestrial life in more than two dozen major…
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  • Lasers show how Sea Monkeys mix oceans

    Marcus Woo-Caltech
    30 Sep 2014 | 12:13 pm
    Even though each “Sea Monkey” is only about half an inch long with 10 tiny, leaf-like fins, they can collectively generate a surprising amount of force. It turns out that the collective swimming motion of Sea Monkeys (brine shrimp) and other zooplankton—swimming plankton—can generate enough swirling flow to potentially influence the circulation of water in oceans, according to a new study. The effect could be as strong as those due to the wind and tides, the main factors that are known to drive the up-and-down mixing of oceans, says John Dabiri, professor of aeronautics and…
  • 5 genes help protect people from severe malaria

    Liz Banks-Anderson-Melbourne
    30 Sep 2014 | 11:56 am
    Scientists analyzed 27 malaria resistance genes and found that five significantly determine how susceptible a person is to severe malaria. The findings could allow researchers to identify new therapeutics or vaccines to fight the disease. For the study, published in Nature Genetics, researchers collected data on 11,890 cases of severe malaria across 12 locations in Africa, Asia, and Oceania, where access to health resources to treat the disease can be difficult. Severe malaria is comprised of a number of life-threatening complications after infection with the malaria parasite. Related…
  • Soliton discovery was a false alarm

    Emily Conover-UChicago
    30 Sep 2014 | 8:02 am
    Physicists say that a group of scientists were incorrect when they concluded that a mysterious effect found in superfluids indicated the presence of solitons—exotic, solitary waves. Instead, they explain, the result was due to more common, whirlpool-like structures in the fluid. Their explanation appears in Physical Review Letters. A soliton wall? The debate began in July 2013, when a group of scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology published results in Nature showing a long-lived structure in a superfluid—a liquid cooled until it flows without friction. Related Articles…
  • Do G.E. crops leave traces in the animals we eat?

    Pat Bailey-UC Davis
    30 Sep 2014 | 7:59 am
    Scientific studies have detected no differences in the nutritional makeup of foods derived from animals that ate genetically engineered crops, according to a recent review. The review also finds that the performance and health of food-producing animals consuming genetically engineered feed, first introduced 18 years ago, has been comparable to that of animals consuming non-GE feed. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of California, DavisSolitary birds gather for noisy 'funerals'Stanford UniversityWater may dwindle as snowpack depletesUniversity of PittsburghOmega-3s boost memory in…
  • Climate change linked to California drought disaster

    Ker Than-Stanford
    30 Sep 2014 | 7:52 am
    Scientists say there’s a link between California’s severe drought and global warming. Noah Diffenbaugh, a climate scientist at Stanford University, used a novel combination of computer simulations and statistical techniques to show that a persistent region of high atmospheric pressure hovering over the Pacific Ocean that diverted storms away from California was much more likely to form in the presence of modern greenhouse gas concentrations. The research, published as a supplement to this month’s issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, is one of the…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Earth and Environment

  • Climate change linked to California drought disaster

    Ker Than-Stanford
    30 Sep 2014 | 7:52 am
    Scientists say there’s a link between California’s severe drought and global warming. Noah Diffenbaugh, a climate scientist at Stanford University, used a novel combination of computer simulations and statistical techniques to show that a persistent region of high atmospheric pressure hovering over the Pacific Ocean that diverted storms away from California was much more likely to form in the presence of modern greenhouse gas concentrations. The research, published as a supplement to this month’s issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, is one of the…
  • California law to promote hybrids leads to traffic ‘nightmare’

    Blaine Friedlander-Cornell
    29 Sep 2014 | 12:52 pm
    A California law designed to encourage sales of hybrid vehicles may have backfired by creating rush-hour gridlock for commuters. Between August 2005 and June 2011, the California law allowed owners of hybrid vehicles that get at least 45 miles per gallon to purchase a Clean Air Vehicle Sticker for $8. This allowed them to drive in carpool or HOV (high-occupancy vehicle) lanes regardless of the number of occupants in the car. Instead of spurring sales, two-thirds of the sticker registrants had hybrid cars already on the road. While adding a single hybrid to any HOV lane at 2 a.m. creates no…
  • Cement’s ‘genome’ could make concrete greener

    Mike Williams-Rice
    29 Sep 2014 | 9:23 am
    By paying attention to concrete’s atomic structure, scientists say they could make it better and more environmentally friendly. The team of researchers has created computational models to help concrete manufacturers fine-tune mixes for general applications. Materials scientist Rouzbeh Shahsavari says the team created what it considers a game-changing strategy for an industry that often operates under the radar but is still the third-largest source of carbon dioxide released to the atmosphere. The annual worldwide production of more than 20 billion tons of concrete contributes 5 to 10…
  • Invasive plant beats ‘weapons’ but not goats

    Tim Lucas-Duke
    25 Sep 2014 | 7:04 am
    Field tests support the use of herbivores, not herbicides, to rout out an invasive plant threatening East Coast salt marshes. Phragmites australis, or the common reed, is a rapid colonizer that has overrun many coastal wetlands from New England to the Southeast. A non-native perennial, it can form dense stands of grass up to 10 feet high that block valuable shoreline views of the water, kill off native grasses, and alter marsh function. Related Articles On FuturityPenn StateDecoy ladies lure nasty beetles to trapsMichigan State UniversityIn warm oceans, phytoplankton may thrive near…
  • Plants can’t run from stress, but they can adapt

    Robert Perkins-USC
    24 Sep 2014 | 8:39 am
    Scientists have discovered a key molecular cog in a plant’s biological clock. In response to temperature, it controls the speed of circadian, or daily, rhythms. Transcription factors, known as genetic switches, drive gene expression in plants based on external stresses such as light, rain, soil quality, or even animals grazing on them. A team of researchers has isolated one genetic switch, called FBH1, that reacts to temperature, tweaking the rhythm here and there as needed while keeping it on a consistent track. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of KansasWill climate change…
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    Futurity » Health and Medicine

  • 5 genes help protect people from severe malaria

    Liz Banks-Anderson-Melbourne
    30 Sep 2014 | 11:56 am
    Scientists analyzed 27 malaria resistance genes and found that five significantly determine how susceptible a person is to severe malaria. The findings could allow researchers to identify new therapeutics or vaccines to fight the disease. For the study, published in Nature Genetics, researchers collected data on 11,890 cases of severe malaria across 12 locations in Africa, Asia, and Oceania, where access to health resources to treat the disease can be difficult. Severe malaria is comprised of a number of life-threatening complications after infection with the malaria parasite. Related…
  • UV light removes 80% of allergens from peanuts

    Brad Buck-Florida
    30 Sep 2014 | 7:21 am
    Scientists are using pulsed light to remove allergens from peanuts in the hope that most people will be able to eat them safely. If allergens can be cut from 150 milligrams of protein per peanut to below 1.5 milligrams, 95 percent of people with peanut allergies would be safe, researchers say. Eliminating all peanut allergens is a challenge, because doing so may risk affecting texture, color, flavor, and nutrition. The work was conducted in a laboratory setting, says Wade Yang, assistant professor of food science at University of Florida. He hopes to eventually conduct clinical trials on…
  • Body fat amps up inflammation from stress

    Leah Burrows-Brandeis
    30 Sep 2014 | 6:16 am
    People who are overweight may be at greater risk for stress-related diseases like type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, according to a new study. It’s long known that psychological stress can trigger biological responses similar to the effects of illness or injury, including inflammation. While normal inflammation is an important part of our body’s healing response, runaway inflammation can contribute to chronic and life-threatening diseases. In a recently published paper in Brain, Behavior and Immunity, researchers report that overweight and obese individuals have…
  • Trouble with alcohol varies among Hispanics

    Sarina Gleason-Michigan State
    29 Sep 2014 | 12:54 pm
    New research untangles Mexican-American, Puerto Rican, and Cuban-American subgroups from overall alcohol use data about Hispanics. The study indicates that the risk of alcohol abuse and dependence can vary significantly among these different subgroups. Using pre-existing national data that looked at the incident rate of alcohol use disorders over a period of time, Carlos F. Ríos-Bedoya of Michigan State University reports that the annual incidence rate isn’t the same among all Hispanics and prevention efforts shouldn’t be the same either. “The problem is major lifestyle…
  • Teens feel better when they think people can change

    Jessica Sinn-Texas
    29 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    When making the transition to high school, teens may be particularly vulnerable to depression. But a low-cost, one-time intervention that sends the message that it’s possible for people to change may prevent depression from setting in. “When teens are excluded or bullied, it can be reasonable to wonder if they are ‘losers’ or ‘not likable,'” says David Yeager, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Texas at Austin and author of a new study published online in Clinical Psychological Science. “We asked: Could teaching teens that people…
 
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    Futurity » Science and Technology

  • Lasers show how Sea Monkeys mix oceans

    Marcus Woo-Caltech
    30 Sep 2014 | 12:13 pm
    Even though each “Sea Monkey” is only about half an inch long with 10 tiny, leaf-like fins, they can collectively generate a surprising amount of force. It turns out that the collective swimming motion of Sea Monkeys (brine shrimp) and other zooplankton—swimming plankton—can generate enough swirling flow to potentially influence the circulation of water in oceans, according to a new study. The effect could be as strong as those due to the wind and tides, the main factors that are known to drive the up-and-down mixing of oceans, says John Dabiri, professor of aeronautics and…
  • Soliton discovery was a false alarm

    Emily Conover-UChicago
    30 Sep 2014 | 8:02 am
    Physicists say that a group of scientists were incorrect when they concluded that a mysterious effect found in superfluids indicated the presence of solitons—exotic, solitary waves. Instead, they explain, the result was due to more common, whirlpool-like structures in the fluid. Their explanation appears in Physical Review Letters. A soliton wall? The debate began in July 2013, when a group of scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology published results in Nature showing a long-lived structure in a superfluid—a liquid cooled until it flows without friction. Related Articles…
  • Do G.E. crops leave traces in the animals we eat?

    Pat Bailey-UC Davis
    30 Sep 2014 | 7:59 am
    Scientific studies have detected no differences in the nutritional makeup of foods derived from animals that ate genetically engineered crops, according to a recent review. The review also finds that the performance and health of food-producing animals consuming genetically engineered feed, first introduced 18 years ago, has been comparable to that of animals consuming non-GE feed. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of IllinoisPeeking inside the mind of a pigletUniversity of LeedsTo protect global crops, keep tabs on El NiñoUniversity of MichiganBats, whales bond on molecular…
  • Belief in alien life varies widely by religion

    David Salisbury-VU
    30 Sep 2014 | 6:56 am
    A new book by David Weintraub, an astronomy professor at Vanderbilt University, takes a closer look at what the world’s major religions have to say about extraterrestrial life. “When I did a library search, I found only half a dozen books and they were all written about the question of extraterrestrial life and Christianity, and mostly about Roman Catholicism, so I decided to take a broader look,” Weintraub says. The book, Religions and Extraterrestrial Life, describes what religious leaders and theologians have to say about extraterrestrial life in more than two dozen major…
  • Sleep twitches teach babies how to move

    Sara Agnew-Iowa
    30 Sep 2014 | 1:34 am
    Babies learn about their limbs and how to use them from twitches they make during REM sleep—movements that are very different from those made while awake. “Every time we move while awake, there is a mechanism in our brain that allows us to understand that it is we who made the movement,” says Alexandre Tiriac, a graduate student in psychology at the University of Iowa and first author of a study published in the journal Current Biology. “But twitches seem to be different in that the brain is unaware that they are self-generated. And this difference between sleep and wake…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Society and Culture

  • Belief in alien life varies widely by religion

    David Salisbury-VU
    30 Sep 2014 | 6:56 am
    A new book by David Weintraub, an astronomy professor at Vanderbilt University, takes a closer look at what the world’s major religions have to say about extraterrestrial life. “When I did a library search, I found only half a dozen books and they were all written about the question of extraterrestrial life and Christianity, and mostly about Roman Catholicism, so I decided to take a broader look,” Weintraub says. The book, Religions and Extraterrestrial Life, describes what religious leaders and theologians have to say about extraterrestrial life in more than two dozen major…
  • Teens feel better when they think people can change

    Jessica Sinn-Texas
    29 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    When making the transition to high school, teens may be particularly vulnerable to depression. But a low-cost, one-time intervention that sends the message that it’s possible for people to change may prevent depression from setting in. “When teens are excluded or bullied, it can be reasonable to wonder if they are ‘losers’ or ‘not likable,'” says David Yeager, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Texas at Austin and author of a new study published online in Clinical Psychological Science. “We asked: Could teaching teens that people…
  • After layoffs, 1 in 5 Americans still can’t find a job

    Steve Manas-Rutgers
    26 Sep 2014 | 8:46 am
    A new report about the lingering effects of the Great Recession finds that about 20 percent of Americans who lost their job during the last five years are still unemployed and looking for work. Approximately half of the laid-off workers who found work were paid less in their new positions; one in four say their new job was only temporary. Related Articles On FuturityStanford UniversityAs global incomes rise, diabetes followsUniversity of LeedsPoorest nations' food crops safer from famineCornell UniversityMen's ability to 'overwork' widens wage gapUniversity of WashingtonOil supply's 'tipping…
  • Does video evidence make bias stronger?

    James Devitt-NYU
    25 Sep 2014 | 12:49 pm
    Where people look as they watch video evidence varies wildly and has a big impact on bias in legal punishment decisions, report researchers. The study raises questions about why people fail to be objective when confronted with video evidence. In a series of three experiments, participants who viewed videotaped altercations formed biased punishment decisions about a defendant the more they looked at him. Participants punished a defendant more severely if they did not identify with his social group and punished him less severely if they felt connected to the group—but only when they looked at…
  • Manly faces aren’t first pick in all cultures

    Jim Barlow-Oregon
    24 Sep 2014 | 8:28 am
    A new study could debunk the theory that women living where rates of infectious disease are high prefer men with faces that shout testosterone when choosing a mate. By the end of the study, that theory crumbled amid patterns too subtle to detect when tested with 962 adults drawn from 12 populations living in various economic systems in 10 nations. Related Articles On FuturityWashington University in St. LouisFaces spark brain activity in depressed kidsUniversity of WashingtonSome sparrows 'flip the bird', others just attackUniversity of California, DavisShiitake-soy blend tested as prostate…
 
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