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  • Arsenic on tap may cut breast cancer deaths

    Futurity » Health and Medicine
    Sarah Yang-Berkeley
    29 Oct 2014 | 8:42 am
    We tend to think of arsenic as a poison, but new research links high levels of the element in drinking water to a 50 percent drop in breast cancer deaths. The study, published in the journal EBioMedicine, presents results of breast cancer mortality data from a region in Chile where residents were inadvertently exposed to high levels of arsenic, which occurs naturally in many minerals. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of California, DavisSugars may 'see' which women have ovarian cancerNorthwestern UniversityRisky steroid used to engineer sex of fetus University of Queensland'Subfertile'…
  • Why the steep rise in disease outbreaks since 1980?

    Futurity
    David Orenstein-Brown
    30 Oct 2014 | 7:31 am
    Ebola has a lot of company, researchers say. Since 1980, the world has seen an increasing number of infectious diseases, including enterovirus, tuberculosis, cholera, measles, and various strains of the flu and hepatitis. Menacing as that may sound, preliminary findings also reveal an encouraging trend. On a per capita basis, the impact of the outbreaks is declining. In other words, even though the globe faces more outbreaks from more pathogens, they tend to affect a shrinking proportion of the world population. “We live in a world where human populations are increasingly interconnected…
  • NYC’s new frog finally gets a name

    Futurity » Earth and Environment
    Robin Lally-Rutgers
    30 Oct 2014 | 5:43 am
    It’s taken more than half a century, but scientists have proved that a new frog species exists in New York City. In fact, the new species is living in wetlands from Connecticut to North Carolina. “Even though he was clearly on to something, the claim Carl Kauffeld made in his 1937 paper fell short,” says Rutgers doctoral candidate Jeremy Feinberg. “We had the benefits of genetic testing and bioacoustic analysis that simply weren’t available to Kauffeld to prove that even though this frog might look like the two other leopard frogs in the area, it was actually a…
  • Why the steep rise in disease outbreaks since 1980?

    Futurity » Health and Medicine
    David Orenstein-Brown
    30 Oct 2014 | 7:31 am
    Ebola has a lot of company, researchers say. Since 1980, the world has seen an increasing number of infectious diseases, including enterovirus, tuberculosis, cholera, measles, and various strains of the flu and hepatitis. Menacing as that may sound, preliminary findings also reveal an encouraging trend. On a per capita basis, the impact of the outbreaks is declining. In other words, even though the globe faces more outbreaks from more pathogens, they tend to affect a shrinking proportion of the world population. “We live in a world where human populations are increasingly interconnected…
  • NYC’s new frog finally gets a name

    Futurity » Science and Technology
    Robin Lally-Rutgers
    30 Oct 2014 | 5:43 am
    It’s taken more than half a century, but scientists have proved that a new frog species exists in New York City. In fact, the new species is living in wetlands from Connecticut to North Carolina. “Even though he was clearly on to something, the claim Carl Kauffeld made in his 1937 paper fell short,” says Rutgers doctoral candidate Jeremy Feinberg. “We had the benefits of genetic testing and bioacoustic analysis that simply weren’t available to Kauffeld to prove that even though this frog might look like the two other leopard frogs in the area, it was actually a…
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  • Why the steep rise in disease outbreaks since 1980?

    David Orenstein-Brown
    30 Oct 2014 | 7:31 am
    Ebola has a lot of company, researchers say. Since 1980, the world has seen an increasing number of infectious diseases, including enterovirus, tuberculosis, cholera, measles, and various strains of the flu and hepatitis. Menacing as that may sound, preliminary findings also reveal an encouraging trend. On a per capita basis, the impact of the outbreaks is declining. In other words, even though the globe faces more outbreaks from more pathogens, they tend to affect a shrinking proportion of the world population. “We live in a world where human populations are increasingly interconnected…
  • Stressed girls show signs of premature aging

    Dan Stober-Stanford
    30 Oct 2014 | 7:07 am
    Otherwise healthy girls at high-risk for depression may be aging at a faster rate than their peers. A new study shows the girls with a family history of depression respond to stress by releasing much higher levels of the hormone cortisol. They also have telomeres that are shorter by the equivalent of six years in adults. Telomeres are caps on the ends of chromosomes. Every time a cell divides the telomeres get a little shorter. Telomere length is like a biological clock corresponding to age. Telomeres also shorten as a result of exposure to stress. Previous studies have uncovered links in…
  • Close elections push voters to extremes

    Mark Burd-Carnegie Mellon
    30 Oct 2014 | 6:29 am
    When political races are competitive, both Democrat and Republican voters favor candidates who are more strongly conservative or liberal, new research shows. The findings contradict conventional thinking that holds close elections swing appeal to the center toward candidates with a moderate or centrist ideology and may explain why voters in the United States have elected so many polarizing candidates in recent elections. Related Articles On FuturityMichigan State UniversityClimate heats up political divideUniversity of MichiganCompared to peers, US health comes up shortJohns Hopkins…
  • NYC’s new frog finally gets a name

    Robin Lally-Rutgers
    30 Oct 2014 | 5:43 am
    It’s taken more than half a century, but scientists have proved that a new frog species exists in New York City. In fact, the new species is living in wetlands from Connecticut to North Carolina. “Even though he was clearly on to something, the claim Carl Kauffeld made in his 1937 paper fell short,” says Rutgers doctoral candidate Jeremy Feinberg. “We had the benefits of genetic testing and bioacoustic analysis that simply weren’t available to Kauffeld to prove that even though this frog might look like the two other leopard frogs in the area, it was actually a…
  • Prostate cancer: Treat or don’t treat?

    Melanie Cross-Tulane
    29 Oct 2014 | 12:56 pm
    A widely used treatment for prostate cancer may cause more harm than good for some patients, a new study reports. For decades, many men diagnosed with prostate cancer were treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), injections that suppressed testosterone production. Related Articles On FuturityRice UniversityCancer relies on three-way switch to decide to spreadUniversity of California, DavisDrug-vaccine combo better for breast cancerUniversity of Southern CaliforniaCan epigenetics make better cancer drugs? A new study published in the journal Onco Targets and Therapy shows this is the…
 
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    Futurity » Earth and Environment

  • NYC’s new frog finally gets a name

    Robin Lally-Rutgers
    30 Oct 2014 | 5:43 am
    It’s taken more than half a century, but scientists have proved that a new frog species exists in New York City. In fact, the new species is living in wetlands from Connecticut to North Carolina. “Even though he was clearly on to something, the claim Carl Kauffeld made in his 1937 paper fell short,” says Rutgers doctoral candidate Jeremy Feinberg. “We had the benefits of genetic testing and bioacoustic analysis that simply weren’t available to Kauffeld to prove that even though this frog might look like the two other leopard frogs in the area, it was actually a…
  • 2 million barrels of oil from Deepwater are still missing

    Julie Cohen-UC Santa Barbara
    29 Oct 2014 | 9:16 am
    Assessing the damage caused by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has been a challenge. The location of two million barrels of submerged oil thought to be trapped in the deep ocean remains an unsolved part of the puzzle. Now scientists have traced the oil’s path to create a footprint on the deep ocean floor. For the new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, scientists used data from the Natural Resource Damage Assessment process conducted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The United States government…
  • Cemeteries reveal the path of an invasive mosquito

    Diana Lutz-WUSTL
    28 Oct 2014 | 8:54 am
    Native to Southeast Asia, the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) showed up in Houston, Texas, in 1985. By 1986 it had reached St. Louis, Missouri, and Jacksonville, Florida. Today, the aggressive, daytime biter can be found in all of the southern states and as far north as Maine. Ae. albopictus has an affinity for humans and is also a vector for human disease, says Kim Medley, interim director of the Tyson Research Center at Washington University in St. Louis. “Even Darwin, in the 1800s, was interested in how species travel from point A to point B.” The mosquito arrived in…
  • Can no-till farming produce enough food?

    Pat Bailey-UC Davis
    27 Oct 2014 | 7:12 am
    A farming method that avoids conventional plowing and otherwise disturbing the soil may not result in more crop yields in much of the world, according to a new review. As the core principle of conservation agriculture, no-till farming has been promoted worldwide in an effort to sustainably meet global food demand. But after examining results from 610 peer-reviewed studies, the researchers found that no-till often leads to yield declines compared to conventional tillage systems. It does show promise for yield gains in dryland areas, however. “The big challenge for agriculture is that we…
  • Chemical in drinking water linked to stillbirth

    Lisa Chedekel-Boston U.
    26 Oct 2014 | 9:59 am
    Pregnant women who are exposed to tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in drinking water may have a higher risk of stillbirth and placental abruption. A new study compared 1,091 PCE-exposed pregnancies and 1,019 unexposed pregnancies among 1,766 women living in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, where water was contaminated in the late 1960s to the early 1980s by the installation of vinyl-lined asbestos cement pipes. Related Articles On FuturityPrinceton UniversityDoes sterilization policy put minority women at risk?Penn StateToxic fungus thrives in bathroom sinksNorthwestern UniversityLow vitamin D in newborns…
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    Futurity » Health and Medicine

  • Why the steep rise in disease outbreaks since 1980?

    David Orenstein-Brown
    30 Oct 2014 | 7:31 am
    Ebola has a lot of company, researchers say. Since 1980, the world has seen an increasing number of infectious diseases, including enterovirus, tuberculosis, cholera, measles, and various strains of the flu and hepatitis. Menacing as that may sound, preliminary findings also reveal an encouraging trend. On a per capita basis, the impact of the outbreaks is declining. In other words, even though the globe faces more outbreaks from more pathogens, they tend to affect a shrinking proportion of the world population. “We live in a world where human populations are increasingly interconnected…
  • Stressed girls show signs of premature aging

    Dan Stober-Stanford
    30 Oct 2014 | 7:07 am
    Otherwise healthy girls at high-risk for depression may be aging at a faster rate than their peers. A new study shows the girls with a family history of depression respond to stress by releasing much higher levels of the hormone cortisol. They also have telomeres that are shorter by the equivalent of six years in adults. Telomeres are caps on the ends of chromosomes. Every time a cell divides the telomeres get a little shorter. Telomere length is like a biological clock corresponding to age. Telomeres also shorten as a result of exposure to stress. Previous studies have uncovered links in…
  • Prostate cancer: Treat or don’t treat?

    Melanie Cross-Tulane
    29 Oct 2014 | 12:56 pm
    A widely used treatment for prostate cancer may cause more harm than good for some patients, a new study reports. For decades, many men diagnosed with prostate cancer were treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), injections that suppressed testosterone production. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of Warwick'Acrobatic' protein motor could hold cancer cluesGene 'cancer-proofs' rodent's cellsUniversity of RochesterHow to tame 'triple negative' breast cancerUniversity of PittsburghViral skin cancer treatment targets proteinVanderbilt UniversityCancer cells ignore their internal…
  • Arsenic on tap may cut breast cancer deaths

    Sarah Yang-Berkeley
    29 Oct 2014 | 8:42 am
    We tend to think of arsenic as a poison, but new research links high levels of the element in drinking water to a 50 percent drop in breast cancer deaths. The study, published in the journal EBioMedicine, presents results of breast cancer mortality data from a region in Chile where residents were inadvertently exposed to high levels of arsenic, which occurs naturally in many minerals. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of California, DavisSugars may 'see' which women have ovarian cancerNorthwestern UniversityRisky steroid used to engineer sex of fetus University of Queensland'Subfertile'…
  • Blood test might diagnose Alzheimer’s much earlier

    Liz Banks-Anderson-Melbourne
    29 Oct 2014 | 8:35 am
    A simple blood test might diagnose early onset Alzheimer’s disease with increased accuracy and much sooner than currently possible. Previous research has found that changes in the brain occur two decades before patients show signs of dementia. These changes can be detected through expensive brain imaging procedures. Related Articles On FuturityWashington University in St. LouisGenome confirms blood disease is cancerUniversity of California, DavisDoes feedback loop keep memory from fading?Rice UniversityPoor in US live 5 years less than richVanderbilt University'Tumor-in-a-dish' predicts…
 
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    Futurity » Science and Technology

  • NYC’s new frog finally gets a name

    Robin Lally-Rutgers
    30 Oct 2014 | 5:43 am
    It’s taken more than half a century, but scientists have proved that a new frog species exists in New York City. In fact, the new species is living in wetlands from Connecticut to North Carolina. “Even though he was clearly on to something, the claim Carl Kauffeld made in his 1937 paper fell short,” says Rutgers doctoral candidate Jeremy Feinberg. “We had the benefits of genetic testing and bioacoustic analysis that simply weren’t available to Kauffeld to prove that even though this frog might look like the two other leopard frogs in the area, it was actually a…
  • Chimps hatch plans to get a good breakfast

    Jeffrey Day-UC Davis
    29 Oct 2014 | 12:30 pm
    Chimpanzees will find a place to sleep that’s on the way to breakfast sites, report researchers. The chimps will also risk travel in the dark when predators are active to get more desired, less abundant fruits, such as figs. “As humans we are familiar with the race against birds for our cherries, or against squirrels for our walnuts and pecans,” says study coauthor Leo Palansky, “but this race is carried out amongst competitors of all kinds of species in locations all over the world.” Related Articles On FuturityEmory UniversityDrug-resistant staph found in…
  • How DEET repels the world’s ‘most deadly animal’

    Pat Bailey-UC Davis
    29 Oct 2014 | 7:14 am
    Scientists have discovered just how DEET repels mosquitoes. They also have identified a plant defensive compound that might mimic DEET, a discovery that could pave the way for better and more affordable insect repellents. More than 200 million people worldwide use DEET, developed by scientists at the US Department of Agriculture and patented by the US Army in 1946. “Mosquitoes are considered the most deadly animals on the planet, but unfortunately, not everyone who needs this repellent can afford to use it, and not all who can afford it can use it due to its undesirable properties such…
  • Tiny ‘hairpin’ probes are made of DNA

    Mark Dwortzan-Boston U
    29 Oct 2014 | 6:27 am
    A new force probe, shaped like a hairpin and made from DNA, offers higher-resolution measurements of cell traction forces. The way individual cells tug on their immediate environment plays a key role in fundamental biological processes like cell division, differentiation, and migration, as well as more complex ones like embryonic development and inflammation. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of SheffieldMapping human stem cells' mutant DNA University of California, DavisEncyclopedia of microbe genomes: Chapter 1Duke UniversityInversion gives plant dual lifestyleBrown UniversitySkin's…
  • Cemeteries reveal the path of an invasive mosquito

    Diana Lutz-WUSTL
    28 Oct 2014 | 8:54 am
    Native to Southeast Asia, the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) showed up in Houston, Texas, in 1985. By 1986 it had reached St. Louis, Missouri, and Jacksonville, Florida. Today, the aggressive, daytime biter can be found in all of the southern states and as far north as Maine. Ae. albopictus has an affinity for humans and is also a vector for human disease, says Kim Medley, interim director of the Tyson Research Center at Washington University in St. Louis. “Even Darwin, in the 1800s, was interested in how species travel from point A to point B.” The mosquito arrived in…
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    Futurity » Society and Culture

  • Close elections push voters to extremes

    Mark Burd-Carnegie Mellon
    30 Oct 2014 | 6:29 am
    When political races are competitive, both Democrat and Republican voters favor candidates who are more strongly conservative or liberal, new research shows. The findings contradict conventional thinking that holds close elections swing appeal to the center toward candidates with a moderate or centrist ideology and may explain why voters in the United States have elected so many polarizing candidates in recent elections. Related Articles On FuturityDuke UniversityConservatives don’t buy into ‘green’ labelsEmory UniversityRoyal couple splits from political pastUniversity of California,…
  • Startups can have too many big partners

    Matthew Biddle-Buffalo
    26 Oct 2014 | 8:20 am
    Startups that work with a few carefully chosen larger companies will get the most benefit, according to new research. Forthcoming in Organization Science, the study finds that by aligning with established companies, a young firm gains valuable access to additional resources and markets. However, as a startup adds more outside partners, eventually the firm’s internal capability will weaken and the cost of maintaining its alliances will exceed any remaining benefits. “Partnerships offer many mutual benefits; established companies can tap into a startup’s cutting-edge…
  • Tea Party conservatives differ on foreign policy

    Peter Kelley-U. Washington
    24 Oct 2014 | 6:13 am
    As the 2014 midterm elections draw closer, a political scientist says that traditional conservatives and their tea party counterparts may have different concerns and motivations regarding foreign policy. While traditional conservatives seem most motivated by concern over American security, Christopher Parker, professor of political science at University of Washington, suggests that those identifying as tea party conservatives have somewhat more mixed motivations, linked with agitation over the Obama presidency and stemming from a feeling of “losing their country” to a…
  • Not all scientists are great at sharing

    Layne Cameron-Michigan State
    22 Oct 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Astronomers and geneticists are good at sharing, report researchers, who say ecologists may need a brush-up on the concept. A study in the current issue of Bioscience explores the paradox that although ecologists share findings via scientific journals, they do not share the data on which the studies are built, says Patricia Soranno, a fisheries and wildlife professor at Michigan State University and coauthor of the paper. “One reason for not sharing data is the fear of being scooped by another scientist; but if all data are available, then everyone is on the same playing field, there…
  • Overweight women less likely to work with public

    Amy Wolf-Vanderbilt
    22 Oct 2014 | 6:53 am
    Overweight women are more likely to work in lower-paying and more physically demanding jobs, according to a new study. They are also less likely to get higher-wage positions that include interaction with the public, and make less money in either case compared to average-size women and all men. Related Articles On FuturityRutgersFemale brain super sensitive to stressMichigan State UniversityPeer networking: boys vs. girlsUniversity of Texas at AustinMen and women differ on regrets about sexUniversity of RochesterFood or sex? It's a no-brainer for male wormsUniversity of North Carolina at…
 
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