Futurity

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Scientists ‘replay’ evolution with mouse teeth

    Futurity
    Lucy Handford-Monash
    31 Jul 2014 | 8:56 am
    Scientists have fine-tuned the shape of a mouse tooth to recreate the gradual transitions that are visible in fossil records. In the past, biologists studied animals with gene mutations to discover how the small details of teeth can help them understand the evolutionary relationships among extinct species. However, the changes were often too dramatic to be very informative. Related Articles On FuturityEmory UniversityPrehistoric fish leaves behind squigglesUniversity of California, BerkeleyHummingbirds invaded North America 12 million years agoCalifornia Institute of TechnologyLife on Earth…
  • Tropical flies show resilience in ‘desert’ tests

    Futurity » Earth & Environment
    Lucy Handford-Monash
    29 Jul 2014 | 9:21 am
    Some sensitive rainforest-restricted species may survive climate change, but only if the change isn’t too fast or dramatic, according to a new study with flies. Previous research offered a bleak prospect for tropical species’ adaptation to climate change. One of the lead researchers of the new study, Belinda Van Heerwaarden, says the impact of climate change on the world’s biodiversity is largely unknown. “Whilst many believe some species have the evolutionary potential to adapt no one really knows for sure, and there are fears that some could become extinct.”…
  • Should docs steer smokers to e-cigarettes?

    Futurity » Health & Medicine
    Tom Hughes-UNC
    31 Jul 2014 | 7:46 am
    More doctors are recommending electronic cigarettes to their patients as a way to stop smoking, but rarely have consistent information about their safety, new research suggests. The study, believed to be the first to measure attitudes toward e-cigarettes among physicians treating adult smokers, suggests more research is needed on the safety of e-cigarettes. Findings are published in the journal PLOS ONE. “Even in the absence of evidence regarding the health impact of e-cigarettes and other vaping devices, a third of physicians we surveyed are recommending e-cigarettes to their…
  • Scientists ‘replay’ evolution with mouse teeth

    Futurity » Science & Technology
    Lucy Handford-Monash
    31 Jul 2014 | 8:56 am
    Scientists have fine-tuned the shape of a mouse tooth to recreate the gradual transitions that are visible in fossil records. In the past, biologists studied animals with gene mutations to discover how the small details of teeth can help them understand the evolutionary relationships among extinct species. However, the changes were often too dramatic to be very informative. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of ArizonaWhy some GM crops fail to fight pestsEmory UniversityAncient teeth show effects of early stressUniversity of ChicagoAncient sharks migrated 'like salmon in…
  • To test TV ads, watch 16 people’s brainwaves

    Futurity » Society & Culture
    Jason Maderer-Georgia Tech
    31 Jul 2014 | 6:44 am
    By analyzing the brainwaves of 16 people as they watched mainstream television, researchers were able to accurately predict the preferences of large TV audiences, up to 90 percent in the case of Super Bowl commercials. “Alternative methods such as self-reports are fraught with problems as people conform their responses to their own values and expectations,” says Jacek Dmochowski, lead author of the paper and a postdoctoral fellow at City College of New York (CCNY) when the study was under way. However, brain signals measured using electroencephalography (EEG) can, in principle,…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity

  • Scientists ‘replay’ evolution with mouse teeth

    Lucy Handford-Monash
    31 Jul 2014 | 8:56 am
    Scientists have fine-tuned the shape of a mouse tooth to recreate the gradual transitions that are visible in fossil records. In the past, biologists studied animals with gene mutations to discover how the small details of teeth can help them understand the evolutionary relationships among extinct species. However, the changes were often too dramatic to be very informative. Related Articles On FuturityEmory UniversityPrehistoric fish leaves behind squigglesUniversity of California, BerkeleyHummingbirds invaded North America 12 million years agoCalifornia Institute of TechnologyLife on Earth…
  • Rice genome could answer ‘the 9 billion-people question’

    Shelley Littin-Arizona
    31 Jul 2014 | 8:31 am
    Researchers have sequenced the complete genome of African rice, a hardy crop that could help feed the world’s growing population. “Rice feeds half the world, making it the most important food crop,” says Rod A. Wing, director of the Arizona Genomic Institute at University of Arizona and chair of the school of plant sciences with a joint appointment in the department of ecology and evolutionary biology. “Rice will play a key role in helping to solve what we call the 9 billion-people question.” The big question The 9 billion people question refers to predictions…
  • Should docs steer smokers to e-cigarettes?

    Tom Hughes-UNC
    31 Jul 2014 | 7:46 am
    More doctors are recommending electronic cigarettes to their patients as a way to stop smoking, but rarely have consistent information about their safety, new research suggests. The study, believed to be the first to measure attitudes toward e-cigarettes among physicians treating adult smokers, suggests more research is needed on the safety of e-cigarettes. Findings are published in the journal PLOS ONE. “Even in the absence of evidence regarding the health impact of e-cigarettes and other vaping devices, a third of physicians we surveyed are recommending e-cigarettes to their…
  • Tiny helicopters can’t out-hover hummingbirds

    Bjorn Carey-Stanford
    31 Jul 2014 | 7:31 am
    The spinning blades of micro-helicopters are about as efficient at hovering as the average hummingbird, which have had more than 42 million years of natural selection to hone their energetically efficient flight. That said, hummingbird wings can still generate lift more efficiently than the best micro-helicopter blades, according to a new analysis led by David Lentink, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford University. The findings could lead to more powerful, bird-inspired robotic vehicles. “I think it’s nice that there are still a few things about…
  • Could a blood test predict suicide risk?

    Lauren Nelson-Johns Hopkins
    31 Jul 2014 | 7:20 am
    A simple blood test may be a reliable way to screen people for suicide risk. The test looks for changes in a gene that helps the brain manage stress and control impulsive behavior. “Suicide is a major preventable public health problem, but we have been stymied in our prevention efforts because we have no consistent way to predict those who are at increased risk of killing themselves,” says Zachary Kaminsky, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “With a test like ours, we may be able to stem suicide rates by…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Earth & Environment

  • Tropical flies show resilience in ‘desert’ tests

    Lucy Handford-Monash
    29 Jul 2014 | 9:21 am
    Some sensitive rainforest-restricted species may survive climate change, but only if the change isn’t too fast or dramatic, according to a new study with flies. Previous research offered a bleak prospect for tropical species’ adaptation to climate change. One of the lead researchers of the new study, Belinda Van Heerwaarden, says the impact of climate change on the world’s biodiversity is largely unknown. “Whilst many believe some species have the evolutionary potential to adapt no one really knows for sure, and there are fears that some could become extinct.”…
  • How killing off wildlife causes social chaos

    Julie Cohen-UC Santa Barbara
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:31 am
    The decline of wildlife can cause hunger and unemployment and, consequently, fuel increased crime and political instability, report researchers. In the nineteenth century, some scholars say the near-extinction of the American bison led to the near-collapse of midwestern Native American cultures. That other civilizations have been affected in similar ways demonstrates the deep interconnectedness of the health of a society and the health of its wildlife. “These links are poorly recognized by many environmental leaders,” says Douglas McCauley, an assistant professor in the…
  • Is Earth headed for its sixth mass extinction?

    Bjorn Carey-Stanford
    25 Jul 2014 | 7:09 am
    Earth’s biodiversity, the product of 3.5 billion years of evolutionary trial and error, is the highest in the history of life—but it may be reaching a tipping point. A new review, published in Science, cautions that the loss and decline of animals is contributing to what appears to be the early days of the planet’s sixth mass biological extinction event. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of LeedsAre Europe's wild bees bouncing back?Yale UniversityMorocco's swimming in ancient sea creaturesStanford University‘Launch pad’ sites boost baby turtles’ oddsUniversity of…
  • Can local fishing communities save the ocean?

    Caron Lett-York
    24 Jul 2014 | 7:10 am
    The first assessment of community-led marine conservation in the Western Indian Ocean shows a revolution in the management of more than 4,200 square miles of marine protected areas. Marine protected areas (MPAs) are zones of the seas and coasts designed to protect wildlife from damage and disturbance and managed typically by governments rather than by local communities. They are rapidly increasing in number as countries rush to meet international conservation commitments. Related Articles On FuturityCornell UniversityTracing family roots with DNAStanford UniversityWeather from Africa will…
  • For plant biomass, size and age beat climate

    U. Arizona
    24 Jul 2014 | 6:37 am
    The size and age of plants have more of an impact on their productivity than temperature and precipitation do, a new study suggests. Researchers combined a new mathematical theory with data from more than 1,000 forests around the world to show that climate has a relatively minor direct effect on net primary productivity, or the amount of biomass—wood or any other plant materials—that plants produce by harvesting sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide. Related Articles On FuturityPurdue UniversityCan amped up compounds improve tomatoes?Princeton UniversityTropical land needs 'beans' to trap…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Health & Medicine

  • Should docs steer smokers to e-cigarettes?

    Tom Hughes-UNC
    31 Jul 2014 | 7:46 am
    More doctors are recommending electronic cigarettes to their patients as a way to stop smoking, but rarely have consistent information about their safety, new research suggests. The study, believed to be the first to measure attitudes toward e-cigarettes among physicians treating adult smokers, suggests more research is needed on the safety of e-cigarettes. Findings are published in the journal PLOS ONE. “Even in the absence of evidence regarding the health impact of e-cigarettes and other vaping devices, a third of physicians we surveyed are recommending e-cigarettes to their…
  • Could a blood test predict suicide risk?

    Lauren Nelson-Johns Hopkins
    31 Jul 2014 | 7:20 am
    A simple blood test may be a reliable way to screen people for suicide risk. The test looks for changes in a gene that helps the brain manage stress and control impulsive behavior. “Suicide is a major preventable public health problem, but we have been stymied in our prevention efforts because we have no consistent way to predict those who are at increased risk of killing themselves,” says Zachary Kaminsky, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “With a test like ours, we may be able to stem suicide rates by…
  • Depressed preschoolers still suffer years later

    Jim Dryden-WUSTL
    30 Jul 2014 | 8:40 am
    Children diagnosed with depression in preschool are 2.5 times more likely to have the condition in elementary and middle school, report researchers. “It’s the same old bad news about depression; it is a chronic and recurrent disorder,” says child psychiatrist Joan L. Luby, who directs Washington University’s Early Emotional Development Program. “But the good news is that if we can identify depression early, perhaps we have a window of opportunity to treat it more effectively and potentially change the trajectory of the illness so that it is less likely to be…
  • Can patients with cancer risk handle false positives?

    David Orenstein-Brown
    30 Jul 2014 | 8:36 am
    Many people who undergo preventative computerized tomography (CT) lung screenings receive positive results on the screening test, only to find out that they’re actually cancer-free. The US Preventive Services Task Force recently recommended this CT lung screening for people at high risk for cancer. Many policymakers have expressed concern that this high false-positive rate will cause patients to become needlessly upset. A new study of National Lung Screening Trial participant responses to false positive diagnoses, however, finds that those who received false positive screening…
  • Moms teach babies the smell of fear

    Kara Gavin-U. Michigan
    30 Jul 2014 | 7:50 am
    Anxious mother rats give off an odor that teaches their newborn babies to be afraid. Researchers studied mother rats who had learned to fear the smell of peppermint and saw them teach this fear to their babies in their first days of life by using an alarm odor that is released during distress. The scientists pinpointed the specific area of the brain where this fear transmission takes root in the earliest days of life. Their findings in animals may help explain a phenomenon that has puzzled mental health experts for generations: how a mother’s traumatic experience can affect her…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Science & Technology

  • Scientists ‘replay’ evolution with mouse teeth

    Lucy Handford-Monash
    31 Jul 2014 | 8:56 am
    Scientists have fine-tuned the shape of a mouse tooth to recreate the gradual transitions that are visible in fossil records. In the past, biologists studied animals with gene mutations to discover how the small details of teeth can help them understand the evolutionary relationships among extinct species. However, the changes were often too dramatic to be very informative. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of ArizonaWhy some GM crops fail to fight pestsEmory UniversityAncient teeth show effects of early stressUniversity of ChicagoAncient sharks migrated 'like salmon in…
  • Rice genome could answer ‘the 9 billion-people question’

    Shelley Littin-Arizona
    31 Jul 2014 | 8:31 am
    Researchers have sequenced the complete genome of African rice, a hardy crop that could help feed the world’s growing population. “Rice feeds half the world, making it the most important food crop,” says Rod A. Wing, director of the Arizona Genomic Institute at University of Arizona and chair of the school of plant sciences with a joint appointment in the department of ecology and evolutionary biology. “Rice will play a key role in helping to solve what we call the 9 billion-people question.” The big question The 9 billion people question refers to predictions…
  • Tiny helicopters can’t out-hover hummingbirds

    Bjorn Carey-Stanford
    31 Jul 2014 | 7:31 am
    The spinning blades of micro-helicopters are about as efficient at hovering as the average hummingbird, which have had more than 42 million years of natural selection to hone their energetically efficient flight. That said, hummingbird wings can still generate lift more efficiently than the best micro-helicopter blades, according to a new analysis led by David Lentink, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford University. The findings could lead to more powerful, bird-inspired robotic vehicles. “I think it’s nice that there are still a few things about…
  • To test TV ads, watch 16 people’s brainwaves

    Jason Maderer-Georgia Tech
    31 Jul 2014 | 6:44 am
    By analyzing the brainwaves of 16 people as they watched mainstream television, researchers were able to accurately predict the preferences of large TV audiences, up to 90 percent in the case of Super Bowl commercials. “Alternative methods such as self-reports are fraught with problems as people conform their responses to their own values and expectations,” says Jacek Dmochowski, lead author of the paper and a postdoctoral fellow at City College of New York (CCNY) when the study was under way. However, brain signals measured using electroencephalography (EEG) can, in principle,…
  • Moms teach babies the smell of fear

    Kara Gavin-U. Michigan
    30 Jul 2014 | 7:50 am
    Anxious mother rats give off an odor that teaches their newborn babies to be afraid. Researchers studied mother rats who had learned to fear the smell of peppermint and saw them teach this fear to their babies in their first days of life by using an alarm odor that is released during distress. The scientists pinpointed the specific area of the brain where this fear transmission takes root in the earliest days of life. Their findings in animals may help explain a phenomenon that has puzzled mental health experts for generations: how a mother’s traumatic experience can affect her…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Society & Culture

  • To test TV ads, watch 16 people’s brainwaves

    Jason Maderer-Georgia Tech
    31 Jul 2014 | 6:44 am
    By analyzing the brainwaves of 16 people as they watched mainstream television, researchers were able to accurately predict the preferences of large TV audiences, up to 90 percent in the case of Super Bowl commercials. “Alternative methods such as self-reports are fraught with problems as people conform their responses to their own values and expectations,” says Jacek Dmochowski, lead author of the paper and a postdoctoral fellow at City College of New York (CCNY) when the study was under way. However, brain signals measured using electroencephalography (EEG) can, in principle,…
  • Minority colleges get a bad rap for graduation rates

    Joan Brasher-Vanderbilt
    30 Jul 2014 | 6:36 am
    A new study challenges the notion that minority students are less likely to complete their undergraduate degree if they attend minority-serving colleges and universities. Looking strictly at graduation statistics, historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) lag about 7 percent below traditional institutions, and Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs) trail by about 11 percent. (Credit: andcombust/Flickr) But graduation figures don’t tell the whole story, says Stella Flores, associate professor of public policy and higher education at Vanderbilt University. For a new study…
  • Facial features can make or break first impressions

    David Garner-York
    29 Jul 2014 | 8:38 am
    Scientists say it’s possible to predict first impressions based on different facial features, such as eye height or eyebrow width. The researchers developed a model based on 65 different physical features. They used the model to predict how people would make quick judgments about another person’s character, for example whether the person was friendly, trustworthy, or competent. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows how important faces and specific images of faces can be in creating a favorable or unfavorable first impression.
  • Farmers market vouchers fill gap in ‘food deserts’

    Rachel Harrison-NYU
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:24 pm
    Vouchers to buy fresh fruits and vegetables at farmers markets could mean healthier meals for families on food assistance, new research suggests. “In terms of healthy food options, farmers market incentives may be able to bring a low-income person onto the same playing field as those with greater means,” says Carolyn Dimitri, associate professor of food studies at New York University and lead author of the study in the journal Food Policy. Related Articles On FuturityCornell UniversityBanning chocolate milk at school can 'backfire'Penn StateShifts in food supply sparked our…
  • How killing off wildlife causes social chaos

    Julie Cohen-UC Santa Barbara
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:31 am
    The decline of wildlife can cause hunger and unemployment and, consequently, fuel increased crime and political instability, report researchers. In the nineteenth century, some scholars say the near-extinction of the American bison led to the near-collapse of midwestern Native American cultures. That other civilizations have been affected in similar ways demonstrates the deep interconnectedness of the health of a society and the health of its wildlife. “These links are poorly recognized by many environmental leaders,” says Douglas McCauley, an assistant professor in the…
 
Log in