Futurity

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  • Why Chinese people may see ‘bad in the good’

    Futurity
    Clifton B. Parker-Stanford
    6 Jul 2015 | 7:40 am
    European-Americans work to maximize positive feelings and minimize negative ones more than Chinese people do, a new study suggests. “Culture teaches us which emotional states to value, which can in turn shape the emotions we experience,” says Jeanne Tsai, professor of psychology at Stanford University. A number of studies by other researchers have shown that people from Chinese and other East Asian cultures are more likely to feel both negative and positive—or “mixed emotions”—during good events, such as doing well on an exam. On the other hand, Americans of…
  • ‘Slow money’ movement would keep capital nearby

    Futurity » Earth and Environment
    Fred Love-Iowa State
    2 Jul 2015 | 7:32 am
    The “slow money” movement seeks to match locally produced and environmentally friendly food and artisanal products and services with fresh capital investment. The growing philosophy embraces environmental and social benefits in addition to financial gains, says Priyanka Jayashankar, an adjunct assistant professor of management at the Iowa State University and lead author of the study. “It’s about bringing money back into the soil and making sure capital is circulating locally,” Jayashankar says. “The idea is to not let the capital circulate so far or so…
  • Rewards of exercise aren’t the same for everyone

    Futurity » Health and Medicine
    David Orenstein-Brown
    6 Jul 2015 | 6:40 am
    We all know that exercise generally helps the cardiovascular system, but does working out pay off equally for everyone? Some of the benefits of exercise are greater for men, people under 50, and among those battling type 2 diabetes or other cardiovascular conditions, report researchers. Researchers analyzed the results of 160 randomized clinical trials with nearly 7,500 participants. The review appears in the Journal of the American Heart Association. “Our meta-analysis is one of the first studies to systematically and comprehensively evaluate the effectiveness of exercise interventions…
  • Toddlers can use iPads by age two

    Futurity » Science and Technology
    Gary Galluzzo-Iowa
    2 Jul 2015 | 9:17 am
    By the age of two most toddlers are able to use a tablet with only a little help from an adult. Other research has explored the prevalence of tablet use by young children, but the new study, in which researchers watched more than 200 YouTube videos, is the first to investigate how infants and toddlers actually use iPads and other electronic devices. “By age two, 90 percent of the children in the videos had a moderate ability to use a tablet,” says Juan Pablo Hourcade, associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa. “Just over 50 percent of…
  • Why Chinese people may see ‘bad in the good’

    Futurity » Society and Culture
    Clifton B. Parker-Stanford
    6 Jul 2015 | 7:40 am
    European-Americans work to maximize positive feelings and minimize negative ones more than Chinese people do, a new study suggests. “Culture teaches us which emotional states to value, which can in turn shape the emotions we experience,” says Jeanne Tsai, professor of psychology at Stanford University. A number of studies by other researchers have shown that people from Chinese and other East Asian cultures are more likely to feel both negative and positive—or “mixed emotions”—during good events, such as doing well on an exam. On the other hand, Americans of…
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    Futurity

  • Why Chinese people may see ‘bad in the good’

    Clifton B. Parker-Stanford
    6 Jul 2015 | 7:40 am
    European-Americans work to maximize positive feelings and minimize negative ones more than Chinese people do, a new study suggests. “Culture teaches us which emotional states to value, which can in turn shape the emotions we experience,” says Jeanne Tsai, professor of psychology at Stanford University. A number of studies by other researchers have shown that people from Chinese and other East Asian cultures are more likely to feel both negative and positive—or “mixed emotions”—during good events, such as doing well on an exam. On the other hand, Americans of…
  • Rewards of exercise aren’t the same for everyone

    David Orenstein-Brown
    6 Jul 2015 | 6:40 am
    We all know that exercise generally helps the cardiovascular system, but does working out pay off equally for everyone? Some of the benefits of exercise are greater for men, people under 50, and among those battling type 2 diabetes or other cardiovascular conditions, report researchers. Researchers analyzed the results of 160 randomized clinical trials with nearly 7,500 participants. The review appears in the Journal of the American Heart Association. “Our meta-analysis is one of the first studies to systematically and comprehensively evaluate the effectiveness of exercise interventions…
  • Bad economy leads parents to favor daughters

    Rob Forman-Rutgers
    6 Jul 2015 | 6:28 am
    When a family finds itself in tough economic times, parents are likely to be more financially generous to a daughter than to a son. And the reason has to do with something parents often tell their adult children—they really want grandchildren. “It turns out this desire to have grandchildren steers parents’ decision-making long before their children’s wedding day,” says Kristina Durante, an associate professor of marketing at Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick. But why would that translate into girls getting a larger inheritance and other financial…
  • No pros needed for children’s talk therapy?

    Stephanie Desmon-JHU
    6 Jul 2015 | 5:16 am
    Orphans and other vulnerable children in developing countries respond dramatically well to talk therapy, even when the therapists have little formal training. The findings suggest that young people from poor nations—including some who experience trauma such as sexual or domestic abuse—can benefit from mental health treatment although health professionals are not available to provide it. “We found that children from very distressed backgrounds can really be helped by a prescribed set of sessions with trained lay workers who otherwise have absolutely no mental health education and…
  • Toddlers can use iPads by age two

    Gary Galluzzo-Iowa
    2 Jul 2015 | 9:17 am
    By the age of two most toddlers are able to use a tablet with only a little help from an adult. Other research has explored the prevalence of tablet use by young children, but the new study, in which researchers watched more than 200 YouTube videos, is the first to investigate how infants and toddlers actually use iPads and other electronic devices. “By age two, 90 percent of the children in the videos had a moderate ability to use a tablet,” says Juan Pablo Hourcade, associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa. “Just over 50 percent of…
 
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    Futurity » Earth and Environment

  • ‘Slow money’ movement would keep capital nearby

    Fred Love-Iowa State
    2 Jul 2015 | 7:32 am
    The “slow money” movement seeks to match locally produced and environmentally friendly food and artisanal products and services with fresh capital investment. The growing philosophy embraces environmental and social benefits in addition to financial gains, says Priyanka Jayashankar, an adjunct assistant professor of management at the Iowa State University and lead author of the study. “It’s about bringing money back into the soil and making sure capital is circulating locally,” Jayashankar says. “The idea is to not let the capital circulate so far or so…
  • Are flood levels in U.S. midwest 5 feet too low?

    Gerry Everding-WUSTL
    1 Jul 2015 | 8:11 am
    Federal agencies may be underestimating historic 100-year flood levels on rivers in the midwestern United States by as much as five feet, a new study warns. The miscalculation has serious implications for future flood risks, flood insurance, and business development in an expanding floodplain. “This analysis shows that average high-water marks on these river systems are rising about an inch per year—that’s a rate 10 times greater than the annual rise in sea levels now occurring due to climate change,” says Robert Criss, professor of geology at Washington University in St.
  • 90 minutes in nature really change the brain

    Rob Jordan-Stanford
    1 Jul 2015 | 7:02 am
    A new study finds quantifiable evidence that walking in nature could lead to a lower risk of depression. Specifically, the study finds that people who walked for 90 minutes in a natural area, as opposed to participants who walked in a high-traffic urban setting, showed decreased activity in a region of the brain associated with a key factor in depression. “These results suggest that accessible natural areas may be vital for mental health in our rapidly urbanizing world,” says coauthor Gretchen Daily, professor in environmental science and a senior fellow at the Stanford Woods…
  • Extreme forest fire in 2013 altered Yosemite

    A'ndrea Elyse Messer-Penn State
    30 Jun 2015 | 10:00 am
    An illegal campfire in Stanislaus National Forest adjacent to Yosemite National Park started what would become the Rim Fire, the third largest fire in California history, that burned from August through October 2013. The fire burned about 400 square miles inside and outside Yosemite, with 78 square miles burned on the worst day. “We would never be able to do an experiment on this, never be able to burn the forest in this way, so this natural experiment is a perfect opportunity to see what happens,” says Alan H. Taylor, a geography professor at Penn State. Taylor and Lucas Harris,…
  • Even ‘warm’ tuna need their favorite foods

    Gregory Filiano-Stony Brook
    29 Jun 2015 | 5:41 am
    Scientists have commonly thought that endothermic, or warm-blooded, fish may be able to be more active in colder waters and thus exploit more food sources. A new study reveals that this is not the case, however, and that combined effects of overfishing and environmental changes can impact the performance of these fish. The ability to “warm” has evolved in some fish and sharks, including certain species of tuna, and many of these species have been extremely successful for millennia in ocean waters worldwide. More active predators? In the paper in the Proceedings of the National…
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    Futurity » Health and Medicine

  • Rewards of exercise aren’t the same for everyone

    David Orenstein-Brown
    6 Jul 2015 | 6:40 am
    We all know that exercise generally helps the cardiovascular system, but does working out pay off equally for everyone? Some of the benefits of exercise are greater for men, people under 50, and among those battling type 2 diabetes or other cardiovascular conditions, report researchers. Researchers analyzed the results of 160 randomized clinical trials with nearly 7,500 participants. The review appears in the Journal of the American Heart Association. “Our meta-analysis is one of the first studies to systematically and comprehensively evaluate the effectiveness of exercise interventions…
  • No pros needed for children’s talk therapy?

    Stephanie Desmon-JHU
    6 Jul 2015 | 5:16 am
    Orphans and other vulnerable children in developing countries respond dramatically well to talk therapy, even when the therapists have little formal training. The findings suggest that young people from poor nations—including some who experience trauma such as sexual or domestic abuse—can benefit from mental health treatment although health professionals are not available to provide it. “We found that children from very distressed backgrounds can really be helped by a prescribed set of sessions with trained lay workers who otherwise have absolutely no mental health education and…
  • Team surprised to find water in this HIV protein

    Jeff Sossamon-U. Missouri
    2 Jul 2015 | 6:51 am
    Around the world, about 35 million people are living with HIV, which constantly adapts and mutates. In response to that challenge, scientists are gaining a clearer idea of what a key protein in HIV looks like, which will help explain its vital role in the virus’ life cycle. Armed with this clearer image of the protein, researchers hope to gain a better understanding of how the body can combat the virus with the ultimate aim of producing new and more effective antiviral drugs. In recent years, scientists have used various techniques to determine the structure of the capsid protein, which…
  • ‘Smart’ mouth guard knows if you grind your teeth

    Steve Orlando-Florida
    2 Jul 2015 | 6:05 am
    A new mouth guard equipped with sensors can tell if you grind your teeth, clue in your dentist, and even help you stop. What’s more, the next version of the guard, currently under development, may be able to tell when an athlete is becoming dehydrated, overheated, and even whether he or she may have gotten a concussion. Researchers came up with the idea about five years ago while developing a set of dentures that alert the dentist to an improper fit even if the patient doesn’t complain about it. That got them thinking about something similar that could help an even larger share of…
  • Why a professor asks students to exercise in class

    Eileen Reynolds-NYU
    2 Jul 2015 | 4:02 am
    When Professor Wendy Suzuki turned 40, she realized that her social life didn’t match up to her professional life. Though she’d devoted her career to the neuroscience of memory, she’d amassed few cherished memories of her own. Suzuki, New York University’s Center for Neural Science, decided to make some changes: joining a gym, cutting down on carbs, and loading up on veggies. As her fitness improved, so did her mood, her energy level, and her sense of confidence. She describes this transition in her new book, Healthy Brain, Happy Life: A Personal Program to Activate…
 
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    Futurity » Science and Technology

  • Toddlers can use iPads by age two

    Gary Galluzzo-Iowa
    2 Jul 2015 | 9:17 am
    By the age of two most toddlers are able to use a tablet with only a little help from an adult. Other research has explored the prevalence of tablet use by young children, but the new study, in which researchers watched more than 200 YouTube videos, is the first to investigate how infants and toddlers actually use iPads and other electronic devices. “By age two, 90 percent of the children in the videos had a moderate ability to use a tablet,” says Juan Pablo Hourcade, associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa. “Just over 50 percent of…
  • Is the universe less crowded than scientists thought?

    Layne Cameron-Michigan State
    2 Jul 2015 | 6:40 am
    New research cuts the estimated number of the most distant galaxies by 10 to 100 times. Over the years, the Hubble Space Telescope has allowed astronomers to look deep into the universe. The long view stirred theories of untold thousands of distant, faint galaxies. “Our work suggests that there are far fewer faint galaxies than we once previously thought,” says Brian O’Shea, associate professor of physics and astronomy at Michigan State University. “Earlier estimates placed the number of faint galaxies in the early universe to be hundreds or thousands of times larger…
  • ‘Smart’ mouth guard knows if you grind your teeth

    Steve Orlando-Florida
    2 Jul 2015 | 6:05 am
    A new mouth guard equipped with sensors can tell if you grind your teeth, clue in your dentist, and even help you stop. What’s more, the next version of the guard, currently under development, may be able to tell when an athlete is becoming dehydrated, overheated, and even whether he or she may have gotten a concussion. Researchers came up with the idea about five years ago while developing a set of dentures that alert the dentist to an improper fit even if the patient doesn’t complain about it. That got them thinking about something similar that could help an even larger share of…
  • How petunias know when to start smelling sweet

    James Urton-Washington
    2 Jul 2015 | 4:28 am
    Researchers have identified a key mechanism plants use to decide when to release their floral scents to attract pollinators. The findings connect the production and release of these fragrant chemicals to the innate circadian rhythms that pulse through all life on Earth. The researchers turned to the common garden petunia, a white-flowered hybrid that releases an aromatic, sweet-smelling fragrance in the evening to attract insect pollinators, such as hawk moths. “Plants emit these scents when they want to attract their pollinators,” says Takato Imaizumi, associate professor of…
  • Why teens ignore risk for a little reward

    Joe Miksch-Pittsburgh
    1 Jul 2015 | 12:10 pm
    Give teenagers just a tiny promise of a reward and they throw caution to the wind. The reason why: They’re brains don’t work the same way as adult brains do, a new study with mice suggests. A long line of studies of the adult brain shows that the feel-good rush of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that helps control the brain’s reward and pleasure centers, may be why some people are willing to take risks. “The adolescent brain doesn’t work the way we think it does,” says Bita Moghaddam, professor of neuroscience at University of Pittsburgh. “We have a set…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Society and Culture

  • Why Chinese people may see ‘bad in the good’

    Clifton B. Parker-Stanford
    6 Jul 2015 | 7:40 am
    European-Americans work to maximize positive feelings and minimize negative ones more than Chinese people do, a new study suggests. “Culture teaches us which emotional states to value, which can in turn shape the emotions we experience,” says Jeanne Tsai, professor of psychology at Stanford University. A number of studies by other researchers have shown that people from Chinese and other East Asian cultures are more likely to feel both negative and positive—or “mixed emotions”—during good events, such as doing well on an exam. On the other hand, Americans of…
  • Bad economy leads parents to favor daughters

    Rob Forman-Rutgers
    6 Jul 2015 | 6:28 am
    When a family finds itself in tough economic times, parents are likely to be more financially generous to a daughter than to a son. And the reason has to do with something parents often tell their adult children—they really want grandchildren. “It turns out this desire to have grandchildren steers parents’ decision-making long before their children’s wedding day,” says Kristina Durante, an associate professor of marketing at Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick. But why would that translate into girls getting a larger inheritance and other financial…
  • Toddlers can use iPads by age two

    Gary Galluzzo-Iowa
    2 Jul 2015 | 9:17 am
    By the age of two most toddlers are able to use a tablet with only a little help from an adult. Other research has explored the prevalence of tablet use by young children, but the new study, in which researchers watched more than 200 YouTube videos, is the first to investigate how infants and toddlers actually use iPads and other electronic devices. “By age two, 90 percent of the children in the videos had a moderate ability to use a tablet,” says Juan Pablo Hourcade, associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa. “Just over 50 percent of…
  • ‘Slow money’ movement would keep capital nearby

    Fred Love-Iowa State
    2 Jul 2015 | 7:32 am
    The “slow money” movement seeks to match locally produced and environmentally friendly food and artisanal products and services with fresh capital investment. The growing philosophy embraces environmental and social benefits in addition to financial gains, says Priyanka Jayashankar, an adjunct assistant professor of management at the Iowa State University and lead author of the study. “It’s about bringing money back into the soil and making sure capital is circulating locally,” Jayashankar says. “The idea is to not let the capital circulate so far or so…
  • How Head Start protected civil rights activists

    Matthew Swayne-Penn State
    1 Jul 2015 | 7:05 am
    In Mississippi in the 1960s, Head Start became a way to upset the political and racial status quo. The federal preschool program did more than improve educational opportunities for poor children. It also gave a political and economic boost to the state’s civil rights activists, according to new research. A key provision of the federal Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, which paved the way for several federal anti-poverty programs, was aimed at empowering the poor and sidestepping black disenfranchisement in the south, according to Crystal Sanders, an assistant professor of history and…
 
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