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  • Was China home to the world’s first chickens?

    Futurity
    David Garner-York
    27 Nov 2014 | 3:06 am
    Biologists have found the earliest evidence of domestic chickens in 10,000-year-old fossils from northern China. At this age, the mitochondrial DNA sequences are several thousands of years older than any other ancient chicken DNA ever reported, researchers say. Despite their age, the northern Chinese chicken sequences represent the three major groups of mitochondrial DNA sequences present in the modern chicken gene pool, suggesting genetic continuity between these oldest chicken bones and modern chicken populations. Based on modern DNA sequences scientists had already proposed that chickens…
  • In Beijing, weather and pollution are a deadly combo

    Futurity » Earth and Environment
    Keith Randall-Texas A&M
    25 Nov 2014 | 12:39 pm
    Traffic and industrial emissions are largely responsible for severe urban haze in China, but weather also can make air pollution much worse. For a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers collected extensive air samples in Beijing, China’s capital and one of the most heavily polluted areas in the world. The city is teeming with a large amount of fine particulate matter (called PM) in the atmosphere that eventually results in environmental and health problems, but also in conditions that affect weather and climate. Weather patterns and…
  • How selenium in broccoli may fight melanoma

    Futurity » Health and Medicine
    Stine Rasmussen-U. Copenhagen
    26 Nov 2014 | 8:22 am
    The mineral selenium, which naturally occurs in foods like broccoli and garlic, appears to slow down a process that allows cancers such as melanoma, prostate cancer, and leukemia to spread. These types of cancer contain mechanisms that block the body’s ability to recognize and destroy them by causing the immune system to over-activate. “You can say that the stimulating molecules over-activate the immune system and cause it to collapse, and we are, of course, interested in blocking this mechanism. We have now shown that certain selenium compounds . . . effectively block the special…
  • Was China home to the world’s first chickens?

    Futurity » Science and Technology
    David Garner-York
    27 Nov 2014 | 3:06 am
    Biologists have found the earliest evidence of domestic chickens in 10,000-year-old fossils from northern China. At this age, the mitochondrial DNA sequences are several thousands of years older than any other ancient chicken DNA ever reported, researchers say. Despite their age, the northern Chinese chicken sequences represent the three major groups of mitochondrial DNA sequences present in the modern chicken gene pool, suggesting genetic continuity between these oldest chicken bones and modern chicken populations. Based on modern DNA sequences scientists had already proposed that chickens…
  • Odd weather doesn’t sway climate skeptics

    Futurity » Society and Culture
    Andy Henion-Michigan State
    25 Nov 2014 | 9:34 am
    Many scientists believe that enough droughts, floods, and heat waves will convince climate skeptics that global warming is real. A new study throws cold water on that theory. Only 35 percent of US citizens believe global warming was the main cause of the abnormally high temperatures during the winter of 2012, Aaron M. McCright and colleagues report in a paper published online in Nature Climate Change. “Many people already had their minds made up about global warming and this extreme weather was not going to change that,” says McCright, associate professor in Michigan State…
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    Futurity

  • Was China home to the world’s first chickens?

    David Garner-York
    27 Nov 2014 | 3:06 am
    Biologists have found the earliest evidence of domestic chickens in 10,000-year-old fossils from northern China. At this age, the mitochondrial DNA sequences are several thousands of years older than any other ancient chicken DNA ever reported, researchers say. Despite their age, the northern Chinese chicken sequences represent the three major groups of mitochondrial DNA sequences present in the modern chicken gene pool, suggesting genetic continuity between these oldest chicken bones and modern chicken populations. Based on modern DNA sequences scientists had already proposed that chickens…
  • How to turn astronaut poop into rocket fuel

    Brad Buck-Florida
    26 Nov 2014 | 9:12 am
    A new way to make rocket fuel uses something that is usually stored and burned up on re-entry: human waste. In 2006, NASA began making plans to build an inhabited facility on the moon’s surface between 2019 and 2024. As part of NASA’s moon-base goal, the agency wanted to reduce the weight of spacecraft leaving Earth. Related Articles On FuturityCalifornia Institute of TechnologySupernova's origin surprises astronomersUniversity of Southern CaliforniaAdding customs officers could boost GDPUniversity of WarwickStar collision may explain the 'lonely' supernova Historically, waste…
  • How selenium in broccoli may fight melanoma

    Stine Rasmussen-U. Copenhagen
    26 Nov 2014 | 8:22 am
    The mineral selenium, which naturally occurs in foods like broccoli and garlic, appears to slow down a process that allows cancers such as melanoma, prostate cancer, and leukemia to spread. These types of cancer contain mechanisms that block the body’s ability to recognize and destroy them by causing the immune system to over-activate. “You can say that the stimulating molecules over-activate the immune system and cause it to collapse, and we are, of course, interested in blocking this mechanism. We have now shown that certain selenium compounds . . . effectively block the special…
  • Anxiety meds may turn teens into drug abusers

    Laura Bailey-Michigan
    26 Nov 2014 | 7:36 am
    Teenagers who are prescribed anti-anxiety or sleep medications are 12 times more likely to illegally abuse them later. The findings suggest that the medical community may be inadvertently creating a new generation of illegal, recreational drug users, experts warn. “The number of adolescents prescribed these medications and the number misusing them is disturbing for several reasons.” Nearly 9 percent of the 2,745 adolescents in the study had received a prescription for anxiety or sleep medications during their lifetime, and more than 3 percent received at least one prescription…
  • Bone cells could help kids who need face surgery

    Laura Bailey-Michigan
    26 Nov 2014 | 6:55 am
    Discovery of a new group of bone cells could mean some children with facial deformities won’t have to wait until they grow up to have corrective surgery. The cartilage-making cells known as chondrocytes replicate themselves, make other bone cells, and drive bone growth. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of PittsburghStem cells: Fountain of youth for old mice?Michigan State UniversityGirls take longer to heal from concussionsPenn StateIn China, moms underestimate kids' weight Bones are smart—they know that by adolescence it’s time to stop growing longer and stronger, and…
 
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    Futurity » Earth and Environment

  • In Beijing, weather and pollution are a deadly combo

    Keith Randall-Texas A&M
    25 Nov 2014 | 12:39 pm
    Traffic and industrial emissions are largely responsible for severe urban haze in China, but weather also can make air pollution much worse. For a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers collected extensive air samples in Beijing, China’s capital and one of the most heavily polluted areas in the world. The city is teeming with a large amount of fine particulate matter (called PM) in the atmosphere that eventually results in environmental and health problems, but also in conditions that affect weather and climate. Weather patterns and…
  • Odd weather doesn’t sway climate skeptics

    Andy Henion-Michigan State
    25 Nov 2014 | 9:34 am
    Many scientists believe that enough droughts, floods, and heat waves will convince climate skeptics that global warming is real. A new study throws cold water on that theory. Only 35 percent of US citizens believe global warming was the main cause of the abnormally high temperatures during the winter of 2012, Aaron M. McCright and colleagues report in a paper published online in Nature Climate Change. “Many people already had their minds made up about global warming and this extreme weather was not going to change that,” says McCright, associate professor in Michigan State…
  • Hidden canyon near Himalayas is a game changer

    Kimm Fesenmaier-Caltech
    24 Nov 2014 | 5:18 am
    An ancient canyon buried along the Yarlung Tsangpo River in south Tibet could change current thinking about how picturesque gorges of the Himalayas became so steep, so fast. The canyon is thousands of feet deep in places. “I was extremely surprised when my colleagues, Jing Liu-Zeng and Dirk Scherler, showed me the evidence for this canyon in southern Tibet,” says Jean-Philippe Avouac, a geology professor at Caltech. “When I first saw the data, I said, ‘Wow!’ It was amazing to see that the river once cut quite deeply into the Tibetan Plateau because it does not…
  • Loss of elephants (and their poop) devastates forests

    Gigi Marino-Florida
    21 Nov 2014 | 9:37 am
    Elephants in Thailand have traditionally been hunted, mostly for fabled properties of their organs, teeth, and tusks. But a new study shows that overhunting has been disastrous for their tropical forest habitats. Elephants disperse lots of seeds across the forest. The dramatic loss of elephants increases the probability of tree extinction by more than tenfold over a 100-year period—a process that will likely cascade to other kinds of forest life, researchers predict. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity at BuffaloSuper-old sea creatures reject evolution’s riskCornell UniversityWhen…
  • Carbon cycle shifts as corn ‘explodes’

    Kira Jastive-BU
    20 Nov 2014 | 10:17 am
    As plants inhale in the summer, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide drop in the Northern Hemisphere. As plant exhale and decompose after the growing season, those levels climb up again. Over the past 50 years, the size of this seasonal swing has increased by as much as half, for reasons that aren’t fully understood. Now a team of researchers shows that agricultural production may generate up to a quarter of the increase in this seasonal carbon cycle, with corn playing a leading role. Related Articles On FuturityNew York UniversityUndersea channels melt ice shelf from bottom…
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    Futurity » Health and Medicine

  • How selenium in broccoli may fight melanoma

    Stine Rasmussen-U. Copenhagen
    26 Nov 2014 | 8:22 am
    The mineral selenium, which naturally occurs in foods like broccoli and garlic, appears to slow down a process that allows cancers such as melanoma, prostate cancer, and leukemia to spread. These types of cancer contain mechanisms that block the body’s ability to recognize and destroy them by causing the immune system to over-activate. “You can say that the stimulating molecules over-activate the immune system and cause it to collapse, and we are, of course, interested in blocking this mechanism. We have now shown that certain selenium compounds . . . effectively block the special…
  • Anxiety meds may turn teens into drug abusers

    Laura Bailey-Michigan
    26 Nov 2014 | 7:36 am
    Teenagers who are prescribed anti-anxiety or sleep medications are 12 times more likely to illegally abuse them later. The findings suggest that the medical community may be inadvertently creating a new generation of illegal, recreational drug users, experts warn. “The number of adolescents prescribed these medications and the number misusing them is disturbing for several reasons.” Nearly 9 percent of the 2,745 adolescents in the study had received a prescription for anxiety or sleep medications during their lifetime, and more than 3 percent received at least one prescription…
  • Bone cells could help kids who need face surgery

    Laura Bailey-Michigan
    26 Nov 2014 | 6:55 am
    Discovery of a new group of bone cells could mean some children with facial deformities won’t have to wait until they grow up to have corrective surgery. The cartilage-making cells known as chondrocytes replicate themselves, make other bone cells, and drive bone growth. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of NottinghamSofter water fails to relieve eczemaUniversity of ChicagoEarly education can improve health 30 years laterDuke UniversityFast-paced puberty linked to depressionEmory UniversityOverweight kindergartners more likely to be obese 8th gradersDuke UniversityThese neurons…
  • In Beijing, weather and pollution are a deadly combo

    Keith Randall-Texas A&M
    25 Nov 2014 | 12:39 pm
    Traffic and industrial emissions are largely responsible for severe urban haze in China, but weather also can make air pollution much worse. For a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers collected extensive air samples in Beijing, China’s capital and one of the most heavily polluted areas in the world. The city is teeming with a large amount of fine particulate matter (called PM) in the atmosphere that eventually results in environmental and health problems, but also in conditions that affect weather and climate. Weather patterns and…
  • MLB batting averages slump after concussions

    Leslie Orr-Rochester
    25 Nov 2014 | 11:59 am
    After a concussion, Major League Baseball players don’t perform as well at bat during their first two weeks back. The concussed players’ batting performances were significantly worse than another group of players who were rusty because of being away for paternity or bereavement leave during the same period. Brain injuries are most often associated with contact sports, but they are prevalent in baseball, too. During this year’s World Series, head injuries affected two San Francisco players, one of whom was not able to play due to his concussion. At the high school and…
 
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    Futurity » Science and Technology

  • Was China home to the world’s first chickens?

    David Garner-York
    27 Nov 2014 | 3:06 am
    Biologists have found the earliest evidence of domestic chickens in 10,000-year-old fossils from northern China. At this age, the mitochondrial DNA sequences are several thousands of years older than any other ancient chicken DNA ever reported, researchers say. Despite their age, the northern Chinese chicken sequences represent the three major groups of mitochondrial DNA sequences present in the modern chicken gene pool, suggesting genetic continuity between these oldest chicken bones and modern chicken populations. Based on modern DNA sequences scientists had already proposed that chickens…
  • How to turn astronaut poop into rocket fuel

    Brad Buck-Florida
    26 Nov 2014 | 9:12 am
    A new way to make rocket fuel uses something that is usually stored and burned up on re-entry: human waste. In 2006, NASA began making plans to build an inhabited facility on the moon’s surface between 2019 and 2024. As part of NASA’s moon-base goal, the agency wanted to reduce the weight of spacecraft leaving Earth. Related Articles On FuturityCalifornia Institute of TechnologyCuriosity finds ancient streambed on MarsUniversity of Colorado at BoulderPutting a lander on Earth's 'evil twin'Georgia Institute of TechnologyUV light 'burns' water off the moon's sunny sideUniversity of…
  • Gutsy chimpanzee moms with sons are more social

    Karl Bates-Duke
    25 Nov 2014 | 7:36 am
    Chimpanzee mothers of sons are about 25 percent more social than the mothers of daughters, despite the dangers of hanging out with aggressive males. Boy moms were found to spend about two hours more per day with other chimpanzees than the girl moms did. “It is really intriguing that the sex of her infant influences the mother’s behavior right from birth and that the same female is more social when she has a son than when she has a daughter,” says Anne Pusey, chair of evolutionary anthropology at Duke University. The researchers believe the mothers are giving the young males…
  • This streaky little bird is brand new to science

    Layne Cameron-Michigan State
    25 Nov 2014 | 7:32 am
    Fifteen years after an elusive new bird was spotted on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, a team of scientists confirms the discovery. The Sulawesi streaked flycatcher, Muscicapa sodhii, has a mottled throat and short wings that set it apart from other species. It’s found in the forested lowlands of Sulawesi where it was first observed in 1997. “Considering that 98% of the world’s birds have been described, finding a new species is quite rare” The researchers report in PLOS ONE that the new species is markedly different from other flycatchers in its plumage, body…
  • Hummingbirds and bugs share flight ‘tricks’

    David Salisbury-VU
    25 Nov 2014 | 6:02 am
    A tiny hummingbird hovering at one flower and then darting to another is an amazing sight. How do they do it? The most detailed, 3D aerodynamic simulation of hummingbird flight yet may have the answer. The findings show that the hummingbird owes its aerial skills to a unique set of aerodynamic forces that are more closely aligned to those found in flying insects than to those of other birds. The new supercomputer simulation, produced by a pair of mechanical engineers at Vanderbilt University who teamed up with a biologist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, appears in the…
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    Futurity » Society and Culture

  • Odd weather doesn’t sway climate skeptics

    Andy Henion-Michigan State
    25 Nov 2014 | 9:34 am
    Many scientists believe that enough droughts, floods, and heat waves will convince climate skeptics that global warming is real. A new study throws cold water on that theory. Only 35 percent of US citizens believe global warming was the main cause of the abnormally high temperatures during the winter of 2012, Aaron M. McCright and colleagues report in a paper published online in Nature Climate Change. “Many people already had their minds made up about global warming and this extreme weather was not going to change that,” says McCright, associate professor in Michigan State…
  • 2 in 5 teens report cyber dating abuse

    Andrea Kunicky-Pittsburgh
    25 Nov 2014 | 9:32 am
    Two in five teenagers have experienced cyber dating abuse in the last three months, according to a recent survey. Cyber dating abuse involves the use of technology to control, harass, threaten, or stalk another person in the context of a dating relationship. The study took place at eight school-based health centers in California where students receive confidential clinical health services, including annual check-ups, sports physicals, and birth control. Related Articles On FuturityWashington University in St. LouisHow cigarette ads find teens on FacebookWashington University in St. LouisFree…
  • Don’t like your boss? Just admit it

    Andy Henion-Michigan State
    24 Nov 2014 | 6:52 am
    If you don’t get along with your boss, new research suggests you’ll perform better at work if you both come to grips with the poor relationship. “Seeing eye-to-eye about the employee-supervisor relationship is equally, if not more important than the actual quality of the relationship,” says Fadel Matta, lead investigator of the study and a doctoral candidate at Michigan State University’s Broad College of Business. Related Articles On FuturityIowa State UniversityCyber security can make or break businessRutgersWives who like marriage have happier husbandsNew…
  • Day care moves can be tough on kids

    Dave Shaw-UNC
    24 Nov 2014 | 3:02 am
    A study of more than 1,300 young children finds that shifting from one day care setting to another can have a negative effect on a child’s ability to make social connections by the time they’re in kindergarten. However, the researchers found no evidence that a change in teachers has any lasting negative effects. “Our findings showed that when young children moved between child care settings, these transitions negatively affected their social adjustment,” says Mary Bratsch-Hines, investigator with the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute at University of…
  • 5 ways parents can help teens excel in school

    Anita Srikameswaran-Pittsburgh
    20 Nov 2014 | 10:10 am
    Parents who think they can take a step back from interacting with teachers once their kids are in high school should think again. A new study shows that teenagers whose parents stay involved in their child’s education through the secondary school years are more likely to have positive academic, behavioral, and emotional outcomes. Parental engagement has been widely recognized as important in the elementary school years, but up until now it has been unclear if parental involvement was as significant in secondary school, researchers say. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of…
 
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