Futurity

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Survey reveals anxious, glum American workers

    Futurity
    Steve Manas-Rutgers
    1 Sep 2014 | 5:48 am
    Seven out of ten Americans say the recent recession’s impact will be permanent—that’s up from five out of ten in 2009 when the slump officially ended. Other the key findings of the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development’s latest Work Trends report, include: Despite sustained job growth and lower levels of employment, most Americans do not think the economy has improved in the last year or that it will in the next. Just one in six Americans believes that job opportunities for the next generation will be better than for theirs; five years ago, four in ten held…
  • Is the U.S. Southwest headed for a ‘megadrought’?

    Futurity » Earth & Environment
    Blaine Friedlander-Cornell
    27 Aug 2014 | 8:51 am
    The chance that the southwestern United States will experience a decade-long drought sometime in the next century is at least 50 percent, researchers say. Further, there is a 20 to 50 percent chance of a “megadrought”—one that could last up to 35 years. “For the southwestern US, I’m not optimistic about avoiding real megadroughts,” says Toby Ault, assistant professor of earth and atmospheric sciences at Cornell University. Related Articles On FuturityPenn StatePressurized water feature in maya plumbingUniversity of VirginiaTwo thirds of eastern US rivers are…
  • Toxic metals in E-cigarette smoke raise red flags

    Futurity » Health & Medicine
    Robert Perkins-USC
    29 Aug 2014 | 8:18 am
    While smoke from electronic cigarettes may not have cancer-causing agents, it does have higher levels of some toxic metals compared to traditional cigarettes. Electronic cigarette smoke contains the toxic element chromium, which is absent from traditional cigarettes, as well as nickel at levels four times higher than normal cigarettes. Several other toxic metals such as lead and zinc were also found in second-hand e-cigarette smoke—though in concentrations lower than for normal cigarettes. “Our results demonstrate that overall electronic cigarettes seem to be less harmful than regular…
  • This is probably how fish evolved to walk on land

    Futurity » Science & Technology
    Cynthia Lee-McGill
    29 Aug 2014 | 1:45 pm
    Researchers are using a living fish, called Polypterus, to help show what might have happened when fish first tried to walk out of the water. Polypterus is an African fish that can breathe air, “walk” on land, and looks much like those ancient fishes that evolved into tetrapods. About 400 million years ago, a group of fish began exploring land and evolved into tetrapods—today’s amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. But just how these ancient fish used their fishy bodies and fins in a terrestrial environment and what evolutionary processes were at play remain…
  • Survey reveals anxious, glum American workers

    Futurity » Society & Culture
    Steve Manas-Rutgers
    1 Sep 2014 | 5:48 am
    Seven out of ten Americans say the recent recession’s impact will be permanent—that’s up from five out of ten in 2009 when the slump officially ended. Other the key findings of the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development’s latest Work Trends report, include: Despite sustained job growth and lower levels of employment, most Americans do not think the economy has improved in the last year or that it will in the next. Just one in six Americans believes that job opportunities for the next generation will be better than for theirs; five years ago, four in ten held…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity

  • Survey reveals anxious, glum American workers

    Steve Manas-Rutgers
    1 Sep 2014 | 5:48 am
    Seven out of ten Americans say the recent recession’s impact will be permanent—that’s up from five out of ten in 2009 when the slump officially ended. Other the key findings of the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development’s latest Work Trends report, include: Despite sustained job growth and lower levels of employment, most Americans do not think the economy has improved in the last year or that it will in the next. Just one in six Americans believes that job opportunities for the next generation will be better than for theirs; five years ago, four in ten held…
  • This is probably how fish evolved to walk on land

    Cynthia Lee-McGill
    29 Aug 2014 | 1:45 pm
    Researchers are using a living fish, called Polypterus, to help show what might have happened when fish first tried to walk out of the water. Polypterus is an African fish that can breathe air, “walk” on land, and looks much like those ancient fishes that evolved into tetrapods. About 400 million years ago, a group of fish began exploring land and evolved into tetrapods—today’s amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. But just how these ancient fish used their fishy bodies and fins in a terrestrial environment and what evolutionary processes were at play remain…
  • Toxic metals in E-cigarette smoke raise red flags

    Robert Perkins-USC
    29 Aug 2014 | 8:18 am
    While smoke from electronic cigarettes may not have cancer-causing agents, it does have higher levels of some toxic metals compared to traditional cigarettes. Electronic cigarette smoke contains the toxic element chromium, which is absent from traditional cigarettes, as well as nickel at levels four times higher than normal cigarettes. Several other toxic metals such as lead and zinc were also found in second-hand e-cigarette smoke—though in concentrations lower than for normal cigarettes. “Our results demonstrate that overall electronic cigarettes seem to be less harmful than regular…
  • Wine goes bad when microbes get ‘talking’

    Pat Bailey-UC Davis
    29 Aug 2014 | 7:45 am
    When wine fermentation gets “stuck,” the yeast turning grape sugar into alcohol and carbon dioxide shut down too soon—and bacteria that eat the leftover sugar spoil the wine. Researchers have discovered a biochemical communication system behind this chronic problem. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of Texas at AustinWorms, plants, people: We are familyUniversity at BuffaloGrape compound linked to longevityWashington University in St. LouisHealthy women may want to skip resveratrol Working through a prion—an abnormally shaped protein that can reproduce itself—the system…
  • Did exploding comet leave trail of nanodiamonds?

    Jim Barlow-Oregon
    29 Aug 2014 | 6:51 am
    Tiny diamonds invisible to the human eye—but confirmed by microscope—add weight to a theory first proposed in 2007 that a comet that exploded over North America sparked catastrophic climate change 12,800 years ago. A new paper published the Journal of Geology reports the definitive presence of nanodiamonds at some 32 sites in 11 countries on three continents in layers of darkened soil at the Earth’s Younger Dryas boundary. A map of the area in the Younger Dryas boundary field covered by the research. (Credit: U. Oregon) The boundary layer is widespread. The nanodiamonds, which often…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Earth & Environment

  • Is the U.S. Southwest headed for a ‘megadrought’?

    Blaine Friedlander-Cornell
    27 Aug 2014 | 8:51 am
    The chance that the southwestern United States will experience a decade-long drought sometime in the next century is at least 50 percent, researchers say. Further, there is a 20 to 50 percent chance of a “megadrought”—one that could last up to 35 years. “For the southwestern US, I’m not optimistic about avoiding real megadroughts,” says Toby Ault, assistant professor of earth and atmospheric sciences at Cornell University. Related Articles On FuturityPenn StatePressurized water feature in maya plumbingUniversity of VirginiaTwo thirds of eastern US rivers are…
  • Is ‘down the drain’ ibuprofen making fish sick?

    Caron Lett-York
    26 Aug 2014 | 12:21 pm
    Ibuprofen appears to be having a negative effect on the health of fish in nearly 50 percent of the rivers involved in a new study. Using a new modeling approach, researchers estimate the levels of 12 pharmaceutical compounds in 3,112 stretches of river in the UK, which together receive inputs from 21 million people. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of YorkLack of biodiversity could topple fisheriesUniversity of OregonMutant fish linked to human deafness syndromeWashington University in St. LouisElephant shark genome offers a few surprisesSyracuse UniversityStressors choking life out of…
  • Fish teeth show winners of massive die-off

    Jim Shelton-Yale
    26 Aug 2014 | 5:43 am
    An analysis of ancient teeth and shark scales suggests that fish populations in the Pacific Ocean were largely unaffected by a mass extinction event 66 million years ago. Known as the Cretaceous-Palaeogene extinction, the event at the end of the Cretaceous period killed off roughly three-quarters of the animal and plant species on the planet. In Earth’s oceans, the extinction of phytoplankton created a ripple effect that ravaged prey and predator species throughout the food chain. “The Pacific just looks different during this period,” says Pincelli Hull, a Yale…
  • Sickly reefs smell bad to baby coral and fish

    John Toon-Georgia Tech
    26 Aug 2014 | 4:29 am
    Unhealthy coral reefs give off chemical cues that repulse young coral and fish, discouraging them from moving into the neighborhood. Coral reefs are declining around the world. Overfishing is one cause of coral collapse, depleting the herbivorous fish that remove the seaweed that sprouts in damaged reefs. Once seaweed takes hold of a reef, a tipping point can occur where coral growth is choked and new corals rarely settle. Related Articles On FuturityStanford UniversityFarm-forest mix may keep species diverseUniversity of MichiganMaples fight to push through leaf litterUniversity of YorkAt…
  • Tourism and mining threaten tiny primate

    Brendan Lynch-KU
    25 Aug 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Genetic research could help save a tiny, carnivorous primate from the Philippines called the tarsier. “It’s really not like any animals that Americans are familiar with,” says Rafe Brown, curator-in-charge at the University of Kansas’ Biodiversity Institute. “A tarsier has giant eyes and ears; an extremely cute, furry body; a long tail with a furry tuft at the end; and interesting expanded fingers and toe tips that look a bit like the disks on the digits of tree frogs.” Brown says the tarsier (tar-SEER) has become the “flagship” iconic species…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Health & Medicine

  • Toxic metals in E-cigarette smoke raise red flags

    Robert Perkins-USC
    29 Aug 2014 | 8:18 am
    While smoke from electronic cigarettes may not have cancer-causing agents, it does have higher levels of some toxic metals compared to traditional cigarettes. Electronic cigarette smoke contains the toxic element chromium, which is absent from traditional cigarettes, as well as nickel at levels four times higher than normal cigarettes. Several other toxic metals such as lead and zinc were also found in second-hand e-cigarette smoke—though in concentrations lower than for normal cigarettes. “Our results demonstrate that overall electronic cigarettes seem to be less harmful than regular…
  • Insertable gel for women could deliver HIV drug

    Jeff Mulhollem-Penn State
    28 Aug 2014 | 1:24 pm
    Researchers have developed a vaginal suppository that, loaded with the antiviral drug Tenofovir, could help prevent the transmission of HIV and AIDS. The semi-soft suppository is made from the seaweed-derived food ingredient carrageenan. Women could use this method to protect against the spread of sexually transmitted infections during unprotected heterosexual intercourse, the researchers say. Related Articles On FuturityBrown UniversityStigma-free way to talk about sexCardiff UniversitySwitching off zinc may stop breast cancerUniversity of California, DavisNew clues to how HIV avoids…
  • Monitor glaucoma with an eye implant and a phone

    Bjorn Carey-Stanford
    28 Aug 2014 | 9:22 am
    Lowering a patient’s internal eye pressure is currently the only way to treat glaucoma. A tiny eye implant paired with a smart phone could help doctors measure and lower eye pressure. For the 2.2 million Americans battling glaucoma, the main course of action for staving off blindness involves weekly visits to eye specialists who monitor—and control—increasing pressure within the eye. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of California, DavisCan’t wear contacts? Larger lenses may helpBrown UniversityTrain with color to fix rapid recognitionUniversity of VirginiaBig brain lets…
  • Photo app screens babies for jaundice

    Michelle Ma-Washington
    28 Aug 2014 | 8:28 am
    A new smartphone app can help parents and pediatricians recognize jaundice in newborn babies. Skin that turns yellow can be a sure sign that a newborn isn’t adequately eliminating the chemical bilirubin. But that discoloration is sometimes hard to see, and severe jaundice, left untreated, can harm the baby. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of WashingtonBaby's brain 'rehearses' before first wordsEmory UniversityAfter cataract surgery, contact lenses best for babiesUniversity of MissouriJaundice pigment could keep arteries clearUniversity of FloridaMove over, salamanders. Mice…
  • Drug combo heals wounds fast with less scarring

    Vanessa McMains-Johns Hopkins
    28 Aug 2014 | 8:13 am
    Doctors have stumbled onto a potential new use for two approved medications. When used in combination, they heal wounds more quickly with less scar tissue. In mice and rats, injecting the two drugs in combination speeds the healing of surgical wounds  by about one-quarter and significantly decreases scar tissue. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity at BuffaloHow worrying could prevent skin cancerJohns Hopkins UniversityCartilage gets bum rap for osteoarthritisUniversity of MelbourneYouth protects malaria parasite from drugsUniversity of Southern CaliforniaFirst mouse with human-like immune…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Science & Technology

  • This is probably how fish evolved to walk on land

    Cynthia Lee-McGill
    29 Aug 2014 | 1:45 pm
    Researchers are using a living fish, called Polypterus, to help show what might have happened when fish first tried to walk out of the water. Polypterus is an African fish that can breathe air, “walk” on land, and looks much like those ancient fishes that evolved into tetrapods. About 400 million years ago, a group of fish began exploring land and evolved into tetrapods—today’s amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. But just how these ancient fish used their fishy bodies and fins in a terrestrial environment and what evolutionary processes were at play remain…
  • Wine goes bad when microbes get ‘talking’

    Pat Bailey-UC Davis
    29 Aug 2014 | 7:45 am
    When wine fermentation gets “stuck,” the yeast turning grape sugar into alcohol and carbon dioxide shut down too soon—and bacteria that eat the leftover sugar spoil the wine. Researchers have discovered a biochemical communication system behind this chronic problem. Related Articles On FuturityVanderbilt UniversityNew type of genetic variation discoveredUniversity of MissouriFrog eggs hint at source of mildew on wine grapesUniversity of Illinois'Green' fuel from red seaweed University of MissouriGrape skin extract before radiation kills more cancerJohns Hopkins UniversityHealth…
  • Did exploding comet leave trail of nanodiamonds?

    Jim Barlow-Oregon
    29 Aug 2014 | 6:51 am
    Tiny diamonds invisible to the human eye—but confirmed by microscope—add weight to a theory first proposed in 2007 that a comet that exploded over North America sparked catastrophic climate change 12,800 years ago. A new paper published the Journal of Geology reports the definitive presence of nanodiamonds at some 32 sites in 11 countries on three continents in layers of darkened soil at the Earth’s Younger Dryas boundary. A map of the area in the Younger Dryas boundary field covered by the research. (Credit: U. Oregon) The boundary layer is widespread. The nanodiamonds, which often…
  • Why trying to listen makes us freeze in place

    Kelly Rae Chi-Duke
    29 Aug 2014 | 5:15 am
    To listen to someone carefully, we first stop talking and then stop moving entirely. This strategy helps us hear better because it cuts unwanted sounds generated by our movements. This interplay between movement and hearing also has a counterpart deep in the brain. Indirect evidence has long suggested that the brain’s motor cortex, which controls movement, somehow influences the auditory cortex, which gives rise to our conscious perception of sound. A new study, appearing online in Nature, reveals exactly how the motor cortex, seemingly in anticipation of movement, can tweak the volume…
  • Neurons reveal the brain’s learning limit

    Shilo Rea-Carnegie Mellon
    28 Aug 2014 | 10:54 am
    Scientists have discovered a fundamental constraint in the brain that may explain why it’s easier to learn a skill that’s related to an ability you already have. For example, a trained pianist can learn a new melody easier than learning how to hit a tennis serve. As reported in Nature, the researchers found for the first time that there are limitations on how adaptable the brain is during learning and that these restrictions are a key determinant for whether a new skill will be easy or difficult to learn. Understanding how the brain’s activity can be “flexed”…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Society & Culture

  • Survey reveals anxious, glum American workers

    Steve Manas-Rutgers
    1 Sep 2014 | 5:48 am
    Seven out of ten Americans say the recent recession’s impact will be permanent—that’s up from five out of ten in 2009 when the slump officially ended. Other the key findings of the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development’s latest Work Trends report, include: Despite sustained job growth and lower levels of employment, most Americans do not think the economy has improved in the last year or that it will in the next. Just one in six Americans believes that job opportunities for the next generation will be better than for theirs; five years ago, four in ten held…
  • Parenting research often skips dads

    Marilyn Wilkes-Yale
    27 Aug 2014 | 7:47 am
    Not enough parenting interventions target men or make a dedicated effort to include them, despite fathers’ substantial impact on child development, well-being, and family functioning, researchers report. The team’s review of global publications found only 199 that offered evidence on father participation or impact. Their findings and a related commentary appear online in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of IllinoisHow couples cope with infertility falloutDuke UniversityShould DNA be a trade secret?Duke UniversityAsk about…
  • Pot-smoking couples tend to be less violent

    Cathy Wilde-U. Buffalo
    27 Aug 2014 | 6:24 am
    A study of more than 600 married couples finds that the more often they smoked marijuana together, the less likely they were to engage in domestic violence. The study attempted to clarify inconsistent findings about domestic violence among pot-smoking couples that primarily has been based on a single point in time. “As in other survey studies of marijuana and partner violence, our study examines patterns of marijuana use and the occurrence of violence within a year period. It does not examine whether using marijuana on a given day reduces the likelihood of violence at that time,”…
  • Can ‘experiential’ stuff let you buy happiness?

    Jared Wadley-Michigan
    26 Aug 2014 | 11:54 am
    Conventional wisdom says that buying experiences brings more happiness than buying material items. But, if you’re going to buy an object, pick ones that provide you with experiences, say researchers. Previous research compared how happy people feel from obtaining material items—purchases made in order “to have”—and from life experiences—purchases made in order “to do.” But this latest study examines people’s reactions to “experiential” products—purchases that combine material items and life experiences—on their well-being. Related…
  • Fewer overdose deaths in states with legal marijuana

    Susan Murrow-Johns Hopkins
    26 Aug 2014 | 6:03 am
    In 2010, states with legalized medical marijuana recorded about 1,700 fewer deaths from prescription painkiller abuse than were expected. While more research is needed, it is possible that the wider availability of medical marijuana for people in pain is reducing deaths by prescription opioid overdoses, researchers say. “Prescription drug abuse and deaths due to overdose have emerged as national public health crises,” says Colleen L. Barry, associate professor of health policy and management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. “As our awareness of the…
 
Log in