Futurity

  • Most Topular Stories

  • To prevent diabetes, one-size-fits-all won’t work

    Futurity
    Christopher James-NYU
    21 Apr 2015 | 3:28 am
    Groups of adults at risk for diabetes harbor different perceptions of the disease, say researchers. The findings could lead to new approaches for education and prevention. “We found that there are differences in the perceptions of those who are at risk for diabetes that depend on the specific characteristics that place them at risk,” says Shiela Strauss, associate professor of nursing and co-director of the statistics and data management core for NYU’s Colleges of Nursing and Dentistry. Illness perceptions, the organized cognitive representations and beliefs that people hold…
  • Wildfires in California spew greenhouse gas

    Futurity » Earth and Environment
    Sarah Yang-Berkeley
    20 Apr 2015 | 10:45 am
    Wildfires in California emit more greenhouse gas than previously believed, according to a new study that quantifies the amount of carbon stored and released through the state’s forests and wildlands. The findings could have implications for the state’s efforts to meet goals mandated by the Global Warming Solutions Act, or AB 32, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by the year 2020. The bill, which passed in 2006, assumed no net emissions for wildland ecosystems by 2020. The information available at the time the bill was passed may have underestimated the release of…
  • To prevent diabetes, one-size-fits-all won’t work

    Futurity » Health and Medicine
    Christopher James-NYU
    21 Apr 2015 | 3:28 am
    Groups of adults at risk for diabetes harbor different perceptions of the disease, say researchers. The findings could lead to new approaches for education and prevention. “We found that there are differences in the perceptions of those who are at risk for diabetes that depend on the specific characteristics that place them at risk,” says Shiela Strauss, associate professor of nursing and co-director of the statistics and data management core for NYU’s Colleges of Nursing and Dentistry. Illness perceptions, the organized cognitive representations and beliefs that people hold…
  • Primates’ precision grip may be nothing new

    Futurity » Science and Technology
    Jim Shelton-Yale
    20 Apr 2015 | 1:11 pm
    Our oldest known ancestors may have had precision grip capabilities comparable to modern humans. Using measurements of the digits’ segments, researchers created a kinematic model of the thumb and index finger of the skeletons of living primates and fossil remains of human ancestors, including Australopithecus afarensis, which appears in the fossil record a million years before the first evidence of stone tools. It is the first such model of digit movement during precision grasping and manipulation in a broad sample of humans, non-human primates, and fossil hominins. Thumb and index…
  • Can online classes really fix college woes?

    Futurity » Society and Culture
    Karen Nikos-UC Davis
    20 Apr 2015 | 12:37 pm
    As tuitions rise and undergraduate students take longer to graduate, the pressure is on to provide a more efficient path to degree. Offering more online courses has been touted as a possible solution. A recent study comparing community college student performance in online versus traditional, face-to-face classes sounds a cautionary note, however. In a study of student performance in the California Community College system—the nation’s largest with 2.3 million students per year—education researchers found that students’ grades and rates of completion are lower in online…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity

  • To prevent diabetes, one-size-fits-all won’t work

    Christopher James-NYU
    21 Apr 2015 | 3:28 am
    Groups of adults at risk for diabetes harbor different perceptions of the disease, say researchers. The findings could lead to new approaches for education and prevention. “We found that there are differences in the perceptions of those who are at risk for diabetes that depend on the specific characteristics that place them at risk,” says Shiela Strauss, associate professor of nursing and co-director of the statistics and data management core for NYU’s Colleges of Nursing and Dentistry. Illness perceptions, the organized cognitive representations and beliefs that people hold…
  • Primates’ precision grip may be nothing new

    Jim Shelton-Yale
    20 Apr 2015 | 1:11 pm
    Our oldest known ancestors may have had precision grip capabilities comparable to modern humans. Using measurements of the digits’ segments, researchers created a kinematic model of the thumb and index finger of the skeletons of living primates and fossil remains of human ancestors, including Australopithecus afarensis, which appears in the fossil record a million years before the first evidence of stone tools. It is the first such model of digit movement during precision grasping and manipulation in a broad sample of humans, non-human primates, and fossil hominins. Thumb and index…
  • Can online classes really fix college woes?

    Karen Nikos-UC Davis
    20 Apr 2015 | 12:37 pm
    As tuitions rise and undergraduate students take longer to graduate, the pressure is on to provide a more efficient path to degree. Offering more online courses has been touted as a possible solution. A recent study comparing community college student performance in online versus traditional, face-to-face classes sounds a cautionary note, however. In a study of student performance in the California Community College system—the nation’s largest with 2.3 million students per year—education researchers found that students’ grades and rates of completion are lower in online…
  • Gonorrhea uses ‘pump’ to resist antibiotics

    Mike Krapfl-Iowa State
    20 Apr 2015 | 12:22 pm
    When gonorrhea bacteria detect an antibiotic, scientists suspect they use a protein to “pump it out” and survive the medication. Now scientists have described the structures of two protein pumps–one used by gonorrhea (the MtrF protein) and one used by Alcanivorax borkumensis (the YdaH protein), a rod-shaped bacteria found in oceans that feeds on oil. The two are closely related members of the AbgT family of 13,000 proteins. “There was no structural information for these proteins, and functional study of them was very limited,” says Edward Yu, a professor at Iowa…
  • Wildfires in California spew greenhouse gas

    Sarah Yang-Berkeley
    20 Apr 2015 | 10:45 am
    Wildfires in California emit more greenhouse gas than previously believed, according to a new study that quantifies the amount of carbon stored and released through the state’s forests and wildlands. The findings could have implications for the state’s efforts to meet goals mandated by the Global Warming Solutions Act, or AB 32, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by the year 2020. The bill, which passed in 2006, assumed no net emissions for wildland ecosystems by 2020. The information available at the time the bill was passed may have underestimated the release of…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Earth and Environment

  • Wildfires in California spew greenhouse gas

    Sarah Yang-Berkeley
    20 Apr 2015 | 10:45 am
    Wildfires in California emit more greenhouse gas than previously believed, according to a new study that quantifies the amount of carbon stored and released through the state’s forests and wildlands. The findings could have implications for the state’s efforts to meet goals mandated by the Global Warming Solutions Act, or AB 32, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by the year 2020. The bill, which passed in 2006, assumed no net emissions for wildland ecosystems by 2020. The information available at the time the bill was passed may have underestimated the release of…
  • Crickets aren’t ready to replace meat

    Pat Bailey-UC Davis
    17 Apr 2015 | 5:23 am
    Crickets can’t yet replace or supplement meat as a source of protein in the human diet, a new study suggests. Worldwide, statistics show that crickets are the most widely cultivated insects for the human diet and are considered the “gateway bug” for people who choose to eat insects. Crickets are touted as highly nutritious and much better for the planet—environmentally and financially—than livestock, due to the comparatively efficient rate at which they convert feed into body mass. But the issue is far more complex than that, report UC Cooperative Extension agronomist…
  • What would save the forest in Indonesia?

    National University of Singapore
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:10 pm
    Protected areas aren’t enough to stop deforestation in Indonesia, a new study shows. The research finds that monitoring and preventing road construction within protected areas, as well as stepping up control measures in illegal logging hotspots, would be more effective for conservation than reliance on protected areas alone. Global rates of tropical deforestation have increased over the last two decades, particularly in Southeast Asia, which lost approximately 32 million hectares of forests between 1990 and 2010. During this period, Indonesia accounted for approximately 61 percent of…
  • BPA trumps temperature to decide turtle sex

    Jeff Sossamon-U. Missouri
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:23 am
    Bisphenol A, a chemical used in plastics that mimics estrogen, can alter turtles’ reproductive systems and disrupt sexual differentiation. Scientists are concerned that the findings could indicate harmful effects on environmental and human health. “If BPA has negative impacts on turtles, then it most likely has implications for human health as well.” Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical used in a variety of consumer products, such as food storage products and resins that line plastic food and beverage containers. Often, aquatic environments such as rivers and streams become…
  • Cobalt ‘thin film’ splits water in two

    Mike Williams-Rice
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:43 am
    A cobalt-based thin film serves double duty as a new catalyst that produces both hydrogen and oxygen from water to feed fuel cells, report scientists. The inexpensive, highly porous material may have advantages as a catalyst for the production of hydrogen via water electrolysis. A single film far thinner than a hair can be used as both the anode and cathode in an electrolysis device. The researchers, led by Rice University postdoctoral researcher Yang Yang, report their discovery in Advanced Materials. They determined their cobalt film is much better at producing hydrogen than most…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Health and Medicine

  • To prevent diabetes, one-size-fits-all won’t work

    Christopher James-NYU
    21 Apr 2015 | 3:28 am
    Groups of adults at risk for diabetes harbor different perceptions of the disease, say researchers. The findings could lead to new approaches for education and prevention. “We found that there are differences in the perceptions of those who are at risk for diabetes that depend on the specific characteristics that place them at risk,” says Shiela Strauss, associate professor of nursing and co-director of the statistics and data management core for NYU’s Colleges of Nursing and Dentistry. Illness perceptions, the organized cognitive representations and beliefs that people hold…
  • Gonorrhea uses ‘pump’ to resist antibiotics

    Mike Krapfl-Iowa State
    20 Apr 2015 | 12:22 pm
    When gonorrhea bacteria detect an antibiotic, scientists suspect they use a protein to “pump it out” and survive the medication. Now scientists have described the structures of two protein pumps–one used by gonorrhea (the MtrF protein) and one used by Alcanivorax borkumensis (the YdaH protein), a rod-shaped bacteria found in oceans that feeds on oil. The two are closely related members of the AbgT family of 13,000 proteins. “There was no structural information for these proteins, and functional study of them was very limited,” says Edward Yu, a professor at Iowa…
  • Grooves let sperm, not pathogens, get ‘upstream’

    Anne Ju-Cornell
    20 Apr 2015 | 10:11 am
    In mammalian reproduction, sperm have a tough task: like trout heading upstream, they have to swim against a current through a convoluted female reproductive tract in search of the unfertilized egg. The research finds that, in the presence of a gentle fluid flow, the biophysics of the female reproductive tract—in particular, the grooves that line parts of it—critically guide sperm migration without aiding the migration of pathogens. The study, published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, also shows that sexually transmitted pathogens that infect humans and…
  • Does watching CPR help loved ones cope?

    Kara Gavin-U. Michigan
    20 Apr 2015 | 7:30 am
    Patients do just as well after a cardiac arrest at hospitals that allow families to remain in the room during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). And in some instances, loved ones may do even better, no matter the outcome. When a hospital patient’s heart stops, the drama starts, as doctors and nurses work furiously at resuscitation. And at many hospitals, that’s the cue for someone to pull a curtain and hurry the patient’s loved ones out of the room. But some hospitals allow those family members to stay, and watch the medical team attempt to save the patient’s life.
  • Broccoli sprout extract may prevent mouth cancer

    Allison Hydzik-Pittsburgh
    20 Apr 2015 | 6:18 am
    Early evidence suggests an extract found in broccoli sprouts can protect people at high risk for head and neck cancer. The compound, called sulforaphane, was tested in mice and a small group of people. A larger clinical trial is planned. Sulforaphane is found in high concentrations in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, and garden cress. “People who are cured of head and neck cancer are still at very high risk for a second cancer in their mouth or throat, and, unfortunately, these second cancers are commonly fatal,” says Julie Bauman, co-director of the University of…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Science and Technology

  • Primates’ precision grip may be nothing new

    Jim Shelton-Yale
    20 Apr 2015 | 1:11 pm
    Our oldest known ancestors may have had precision grip capabilities comparable to modern humans. Using measurements of the digits’ segments, researchers created a kinematic model of the thumb and index finger of the skeletons of living primates and fossil remains of human ancestors, including Australopithecus afarensis, which appears in the fossil record a million years before the first evidence of stone tools. It is the first such model of digit movement during precision grasping and manipulation in a broad sample of humans, non-human primates, and fossil hominins. Thumb and index…
  • Bigger isn’t better for baboon rear ends

    Robin Smith-Duke
    20 Apr 2015 | 9:54 am
    Biologists have long thought that baboon males prefer females with bigger backsides as the mark of a good mother, but new research suggests it isn’t so simple. A study of wild baboons (Papio cynocephalus) in southern Kenya reveals that the size of a female’s swollen rump doesn’t matter as much as previously thought. Baboons breed throughout the year, and mating occurs during times when a female’s behind is swollen—a sign that she may be ovulating. For 10 to 20 days each month, the tissue in a female baboon’s hindquarters swells up, reaching peak size when a…
  • How animals went from fins to legs to fins again

    David Salisbury-VU
    20 Apr 2015 | 7:54 am
    Marine tetrapods, a group of animals that includes whales, dolphins, seals, and sea turtles, have moved from the sea to the land and back to the sea over the last 350 million years—each time making radical changes to their lifestyle, body shape, physiology, and sensory systems. “These land-to-sea transitions act like repeated evolutionary experiments,” says Neil Kelley, a former lecturer in earth and environmental sciences at Vanderbilt University who is now a postdoctoral researcher at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History’s department of paleobiology.
  • Nanotubes with 2 walls might be ‘tunable’

    Mike Williams-Rice
    20 Apr 2015 | 7:09 am
    Carbon nanotubes, grown by various methods, come in two basic varieties: single-walled and those with two or more walls. Scientists knew that double-walled nanotubes are stronger and stiffer than their single-walled cousins. But a team at Rice University found there’s even more to them when they started looking at how the inner and outer walls match up using tubes with zigzag chirality. Because the electrical properties of single-walled tubes depend on their chirality—the angles of their hexagonal arrangement of atoms—the researchers thought it would be interesting to learn more…
  • Stone Age toolmakers deserve more respect

    Carol Clark-Emory
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:16 am
    Making a Stone Age hand axe took serious brain power, experts say. The skill of making a prehistoric hand axe is “more complicated and nuanced than many people realize,” says Dietrich Stout, an experimental archeologist at Emory University. “It’s not just a bunch of ape-men banging rocks together. We should have respect for Stone Age toolmakers.” A new study led by Stout and published in PLOS ONE shows the ability to make the hand axe depends on complex cognitive control by the prefrontal cortex, including the “central executive” function of working…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Society and Culture

  • Can online classes really fix college woes?

    Karen Nikos-UC Davis
    20 Apr 2015 | 12:37 pm
    As tuitions rise and undergraduate students take longer to graduate, the pressure is on to provide a more efficient path to degree. Offering more online courses has been touted as a possible solution. A recent study comparing community college student performance in online versus traditional, face-to-face classes sounds a cautionary note, however. In a study of student performance in the California Community College system—the nation’s largest with 2.3 million students per year—education researchers found that students’ grades and rates of completion are lower in online…
  • Why do so many NFL players go bankrupt?

    Jessica Stoller-Conrad - Caltech
    20 Apr 2015 | 10:14 am
    Most players in the National Football League (NFL) should never go bankrupt, but some do. And economists are struggling to explain why. Researchers entered publicly available income data from NFL players into a simulation to predict how well players should fare in retirement, based on their income and a well-respected economic model. The simulations suggested the players’ initial earnings should support them through their entire retirement. However, when the researchers looked at what actually happens, they found that approximately 2 percent of players have filed for bankruptcy within…
  • Team puts ‘weird’ grammar on the map

    Bess Connolly Martell-Yale
    20 Apr 2015 | 7:20 am
    Researchers are working to document sentences like “Here’s you a piece of pizza.” Though it sounds totally normal to some English speakers in the United States, it strikes others as totally bizarre. The Yale Grammatical Diversity Project explores the diversity found in varieties of English spoken in North America by documenting the subtle—but systematic—differences in syntax, the study of how phrases and sentences are put together. To understand the syntax of human language, linguists sometimes compare languages that are radically different from one another (like Navajo…
  • Stone Age toolmakers deserve more respect

    Carol Clark-Emory
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:16 am
    Making a Stone Age hand axe took serious brain power, experts say. The skill of making a prehistoric hand axe is “more complicated and nuanced than many people realize,” says Dietrich Stout, an experimental archeologist at Emory University. “It’s not just a bunch of ape-men banging rocks together. We should have respect for Stone Age toolmakers.” A new study led by Stout and published in PLOS ONE shows the ability to make the hand axe depends on complex cognitive control by the prefrontal cortex, including the “central executive” function of working…
  • Are women actually better at negotiation?

    U. Florida
    17 Apr 2015 | 8:40 am
    Women with successful negotiation experience are better negotiators than men, even when they rate themselves as average at it, a new study finds. The research got its start when University of Florida student Samantha Miller was listening to a lecture on a commonly held trope about negotiation—that women are bad at it. That conventional wisdom didn’t fit with her experience at all. “I hope people shut up about gender and talk about the framework that informs gender bias.” “I always ask what I feel I’m deserving of,” she says. “I had an idea that…
 
Log in