Futurity

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Why tilt-a-worlds could be good places for life

    Futurity
    Peter Kelley-U. Washington
    16 Apr 2014 | 1:08 pm
    A fluctuating tilt in a planet’s orbit doesn’t rule out the possibility of life, new research shows. In fact, sometimes it helps. That’s because such “tilt-a-worlds,” as astronomers sometimes call them—turned from their orbital plane by the influence of companion planets—are less likely than fixed-spin planets to freeze over because heat from their host star is more evenly distributed. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of WarwickGamma-ray burst from whopper of a star University of California, Davis'Water-pumping' fabric channels away sweatUniversity of…
  • Puget Sound waters bubble up from turbulent canyon

    Futurity » Earth & Environment
    Hannah Hickey-UW
    16 Apr 2014 | 8:07 am
    Puget Sound’s headwaters lie far below the surface, in a submarine canyon that draws nutrient-rich water up from the deep ocean. The new findings  may explain how the Pacific Northwest’s inland waters are able to support so many shellfish, salmon runs, and even the occasional pod of whales. The first detailed measurements at the headwater’s source—offshore from the strait that separates the US and Canada—show water surging up through the canyon and mixing at surprisingly high rates. An instrument that measured fast-moving water near the seafloor inside the Juan de Fuca…
  • Antibiotics help malnourished children grow

    Futurity » Health & Medicine
    Cynthia Lee-McGill
    16 Apr 2014 | 12:17 pm
    A review of the research shows that antibiotics improve the height and weight of the youngest and most vulnerable children in the world, but it’s not without risks. Malnutrition in early childhood, reflected in poor growth, is the cause of nearly half of all mortality worldwide in children less than five years old. The World Health Organization (WHO) currently recommends antibiotics for severely malnourished children, and those infected or exposed to HIV, to reduce mortality. Related Articles On FuturityBrown UniversityNew drugs use cell 'garbage disposal' to kill bacteriaMcGill…
  • Why tilt-a-worlds could be good places for life

    Futurity » Science & Technology
    Peter Kelley-U. Washington
    16 Apr 2014 | 1:08 pm
    A fluctuating tilt in a planet’s orbit doesn’t rule out the possibility of life, new research shows. In fact, sometimes it helps. That’s because such “tilt-a-worlds,” as astronomers sometimes call them—turned from their orbital plane by the influence of companion planets—are less likely than fixed-spin planets to freeze over because heat from their host star is more evenly distributed. Related Articles On FuturityCornell UniversitySaturn's methane moon hides buried oceanUniversity of ArizonaViolent weather on Neptune, Uranus doesn't run deepUniversity of…
  • How to keep women on parole out of prison

    Futurity » Society & Culture
    Andy Henion-Michigan State
    16 Apr 2014 | 8:10 am
    As the female prison population grows, more should be done to help women probationers and parolees in poor urban areas remain crime-free, a new study reports. Black women on probation and parole feel they have little choice but to isolate themselves in their homes or risk getting caught up in the type of criminal activity that got them in trouble in the first place. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of California, DavisCancer screening: location, location, locationEven in rural spots, US diversity on the riseNew York UniversityDeath penalty may not impact murder rateUniversity of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity

  • Why tilt-a-worlds could be good places for life

    Peter Kelley-U. Washington
    16 Apr 2014 | 1:08 pm
    A fluctuating tilt in a planet’s orbit doesn’t rule out the possibility of life, new research shows. In fact, sometimes it helps. That’s because such “tilt-a-worlds,” as astronomers sometimes call them—turned from their orbital plane by the influence of companion planets—are less likely than fixed-spin planets to freeze over because heat from their host star is more evenly distributed. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of WarwickGamma-ray burst from whopper of a star University of California, Davis'Water-pumping' fabric channels away sweatUniversity of…
  • Antibiotics help malnourished children grow

    Cynthia Lee-McGill
    16 Apr 2014 | 12:17 pm
    A review of the research shows that antibiotics improve the height and weight of the youngest and most vulnerable children in the world, but it’s not without risks. Malnutrition in early childhood, reflected in poor growth, is the cause of nearly half of all mortality worldwide in children less than five years old. The World Health Organization (WHO) currently recommends antibiotics for severely malnourished children, and those infected or exposed to HIV, to reduce mortality. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillCommon behaviors increase babies' risk of…
  • The closer you get, the closer you’ll feel

    Lanna Crucefix-Toronto
    16 Apr 2014 | 9:57 am
    Facing the right direction—straight ahead—makes a destination seem closer, research shows, and the closer you get, the more connected you’ll feel. In a series of six studies, Sam Maglio, an assistant professor in the University of Toronto, Scarborough, department of management, demonstrates that a person’s orientation—the direction they are headed—changes how they thought of an object or event. Related Articles On FuturityCalifornia Institute of TechnologyEmotional fruit flies offer clues to ADHDNorthwestern UniversityCalm wives may make for happier marriagesMcGill…
  • Fossil embryos ‘frozen’ for 500 million years

    Jeff Sossamon-U. Missouri
    16 Apr 2014 | 8:14 am
    The Cambrian Period was a time when most phyla of marine invertebrates first appeared in the fossil record. Also called the “Cambrian explosion,” this era’s fossil record provides glimpses into evolutionary biology when the world’s ecosystems rapidly changed and diversified. Most fossils show the organisms’ skeletal structure, which may or may not give researchers accurate pictures of these prehistoric organisms. Now, researchers have found rare, fossilized embryos they believe were undiscovered previously. Their methods of study may help with future…
  • How to keep women on parole out of prison

    Andy Henion-Michigan State
    16 Apr 2014 | 8:10 am
    As the female prison population grows, more should be done to help women probationers and parolees in poor urban areas remain crime-free, a new study reports. Black women on probation and parole feel they have little choice but to isolate themselves in their homes or risk getting caught up in the type of criminal activity that got them in trouble in the first place. Related Articles On FuturityCarnegie Mellon UniversityWith all-white jury pools, verdict disparityUniversity of Texas at AustinNot your mom's menopauseNorthwestern UniversityBlack students more likely to tweet Probation and parole…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Earth & Environment

  • Puget Sound waters bubble up from turbulent canyon

    Hannah Hickey-UW
    16 Apr 2014 | 8:07 am
    Puget Sound’s headwaters lie far below the surface, in a submarine canyon that draws nutrient-rich water up from the deep ocean. The new findings  may explain how the Pacific Northwest’s inland waters are able to support so many shellfish, salmon runs, and even the occasional pod of whales. The first detailed measurements at the headwater’s source—offshore from the strait that separates the US and Canada—show water surging up through the canyon and mixing at surprisingly high rates. An instrument that measured fast-moving water near the seafloor inside the Juan de Fuca…
  • Tigers need diverse gene pool to survive

    Rob Jordan-Stanford
    16 Apr 2014 | 5:11 am
    New research shows that increasing genetic diversity among the 3,000 or so tigers left on the planet, though interbreeding and other methods, may be the key to their survival as a species. Iconic symbols of power and beauty, wild tigers may roam only in stories someday soon. Their historical range has been reduced by more than 90 percent. Related Articles On FuturityPenn StateDNA splits identical algae into speciesWashington University in St. LouisSmokers with lung cancer have 10x more mutationsSeabird bones reveal effects of ‘big’ fishingPurdue UniversityWeed-killer warps genes in fish…
  • ‘SQUID’ method unscrambles ancient rock record

    Kimm Fesenmaier-Caltech
    15 Apr 2014 | 8:44 am
    A lot can happen to a rock over the course of two and a half billion years. It can get buried and heated; fluids remove some of its minerals and precipitate others; its chemistry changes. So if you want to use that rock to learn about the conditions on the early Earth, you have to do some geologic sleuthing. You have to figure out which parts of the rock are original and which came later. Now a team of researchers has developed and applied a unique technique that removes much of the guesswork. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of California, BerkeleyGators thrived on swampy Arctic…
  • Drought and fire push Amazon forests to tipping point

    Anne Danahy-Penn State
    15 Apr 2014 | 6:50 am
    Deforestation and fragmentation of forests in the Amazon help create tinderbox conditions for wildfires in remnant forests and contribute to rapid and widespread loss of trees during drought years, researchers say. The findings show that forests in the Amazon could reach a tipping point when severe droughts coupled with forest fires lead to large-scale loss of trees, making recovery more difficult. The experimental burns set by the researchers move slowly and at low intensities in the forest interior, but they can still have damaging effects on trees that are not adapted to fire. (Credit:…
  • Fish in acidic water less able to smell predators

    Brett Israel-Georgia Tech
    15 Apr 2014 | 6:40 am
    Fish living on coral reefs where carbon dioxide seeps from the ocean floor are less able to detect predator odor than fish from normal coral reefs, according to a new study. The study confirms laboratory experiments showing that increased carbon dioxide concentrations in the ocean can seriously affect the behavior of reef fishes. The new study is the first to analyze the sensory impairment of fish from CO2 seeps, where pH is similar to what climate models forecast for surface waters by the turn of the century. Juvenile fishes from a carbon dioxide seep, such as these damselfishes, were less…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Health & Medicine

  • Antibiotics help malnourished children grow

    Cynthia Lee-McGill
    16 Apr 2014 | 12:17 pm
    A review of the research shows that antibiotics improve the height and weight of the youngest and most vulnerable children in the world, but it’s not without risks. Malnutrition in early childhood, reflected in poor growth, is the cause of nearly half of all mortality worldwide in children less than five years old. The World Health Organization (WHO) currently recommends antibiotics for severely malnourished children, and those infected or exposed to HIV, to reduce mortality. Related Articles On FuturityBrown UniversityNew drugs use cell 'garbage disposal' to kill bacteriaMcGill…
  • Time to rethink morning sickness drug?

    Geoff Koehler-Toronto
    16 Apr 2014 | 6:41 am
    The most commonly prescribed drug for first-trimester morning sickness, pyridoxine-doxylamine, does not prevent birth defects even though drug safety data say it does, according to researchers. The drug is so popular that it has been prescribed to 33 million women worldwide and is used in half of pregnancies in Canada that result in live births. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada lists it as the standard of care for women with nausea and vomiting “since it has the greatest evidence to support its efficacy and safety.” Related Articles On FuturityWashington…
  • SSRI use in pregnancy linked to boys’ autism risk

    Phyllis Brown-UC Davis
    16 Apr 2014 | 5:56 am
    Prenatal exposure to certain medications that are often prescribed to treat depression, anxiety, and other mental health disorders, is associated with a higher incidence of autism spectrum disorder and developmental delays in boys, new research shows. “This study provides further evidence that in some children, prenatal exposure to SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors), may influence their risk for developing an autism spectrum disorder,” says Professor Irva Hertz-Picciotto, chief of the division of environmental and occupational health at University of California,…
  • How video surveillance could improve hygiene

    Rob Jordan-Stanford
    15 Apr 2014 | 7:06 am
    In an effort to boost health outcomes, researchers use video surveillance to better understand hand-washing hygiene practices of children in developing world settings. One of the best defenses against infectious disease is one of the most simple—hand-washing. Still, despite years of global public awareness campaigns, hand-washing rates remain low. Caregivers of young children in low-income, developing world settings are found to wash their hands only 17 percent of the time after using the toilet. Overall, when students were alone at a hand-cleaning station, hand-cleaning rates averaged 48…
  • Deadly parasite nibbles human cells to death

    Josh Barney-Virginia
    15 Apr 2014 | 5:13 am
    A parasitic amoeba that causes a potentially deadly infection kills human cells by nibbling them to death—much like a piranha attacks its prey. Until now, researchers had assumed that the amoeba, Entamoeba histolytica, killed and then engulfed and consumed human cells. But new research upends that idea, suggesting instead that it takes small bites of the cell until the cell dies—and then loses all interest in eating the corpse. Entamoeba histolytica parasites (blue) ingesting bites of intestinal cells in an explanted mouse intestine (green), captured using live two-photon microscopy.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Science & Technology

  • Why tilt-a-worlds could be good places for life

    Peter Kelley-U. Washington
    16 Apr 2014 | 1:08 pm
    A fluctuating tilt in a planet’s orbit doesn’t rule out the possibility of life, new research shows. In fact, sometimes it helps. That’s because such “tilt-a-worlds,” as astronomers sometimes call them—turned from their orbital plane by the influence of companion planets—are less likely than fixed-spin planets to freeze over because heat from their host star is more evenly distributed. Related Articles On FuturityCornell UniversitySaturn's methane moon hides buried oceanUniversity of ArizonaViolent weather on Neptune, Uranus doesn't run deepUniversity of…
  • The closer you get, the closer you’ll feel

    Lanna Crucefix-Toronto
    16 Apr 2014 | 9:57 am
    Facing the right direction—straight ahead—makes a destination seem closer, research shows, and the closer you get, the more connected you’ll feel. In a series of six studies, Sam Maglio, an assistant professor in the University of Toronto, Scarborough, department of management, demonstrates that a person’s orientation—the direction they are headed—changes how they thought of an object or event. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLike vs. dislike shifts how brain 'sees'Emory UniversityDistressed elephants get 'hugs' from palsMichigan State…
  • Fossil embryos ‘frozen’ for 500 million years

    Jeff Sossamon-U. Missouri
    16 Apr 2014 | 8:14 am
    The Cambrian Period was a time when most phyla of marine invertebrates first appeared in the fossil record. Also called the “Cambrian explosion,” this era’s fossil record provides glimpses into evolutionary biology when the world’s ecosystems rapidly changed and diversified. Most fossils show the organisms’ skeletal structure, which may or may not give researchers accurate pictures of these prehistoric organisms. Now, researchers have found rare, fossilized embryos they believe were undiscovered previously. Their methods of study may help with future…
  • Puget Sound waters bubble up from turbulent canyon

    Hannah Hickey-UW
    16 Apr 2014 | 8:07 am
    Puget Sound’s headwaters lie far below the surface, in a submarine canyon that draws nutrient-rich water up from the deep ocean. The new findings  may explain how the Pacific Northwest’s inland waters are able to support so many shellfish, salmon runs, and even the occasional pod of whales. The first detailed measurements at the headwater’s source—offshore from the strait that separates the US and Canada—show water surging up through the canyon and mixing at surprisingly high rates. An instrument that measured fast-moving water near the seafloor inside the Juan de Fuca…
  • To keep us sane, brain ignores tiny visual changes

    Yasmin Anwar-UC Berkeley
    16 Apr 2014 | 6:06 am
    Vision scientists have discovered an upside to the brain mechanism that can blind us to subtle visual changes in the movies and in the real world. For example, ever notice how Harry Potter’s T-shirt changes from a crewneck to a henley shirt in the Order of the Phoenix, or how in Pretty Woman, Julia Roberts’ croissant inexplicably morphs into a pancake? Don’t worry if you missed those continuity bloopers. The researchers have discovered a “continuity field” in which we visually merge together similar objects seen within a 15-second time frame, hence the previously…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Society & Culture

  • How to keep women on parole out of prison

    Andy Henion-Michigan State
    16 Apr 2014 | 8:10 am
    As the female prison population grows, more should be done to help women probationers and parolees in poor urban areas remain crime-free, a new study reports. Black women on probation and parole feel they have little choice but to isolate themselves in their homes or risk getting caught up in the type of criminal activity that got them in trouble in the first place. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of California, DavisCancer screening: location, location, locationEven in rural spots, US diversity on the riseNew York UniversityDeath penalty may not impact murder rateUniversity of…
  • Toddlers assess fairness and race of playmates

    Molly McElroy-UW
    15 Apr 2014 | 11:56 am
    New research shows that toddlers can take into account both race and how a person treats someone else when deciding who would make a better playmate. Jessica Sommerville, associate professor of psychology at the University of Washington, who studies how children develop social behaviors like kindness and generosity, noticed something odd a few years ago. The 15-month-old infants in her experiments seemed to be playing favorites among the researchers on her team, being more inclined to share toys or play with some researchers than others. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of…
  • Do ads miss the mark for binational families?

    Angie Hunt-Iowa State
    15 Apr 2014 | 8:29 am
    Cultural competence may be a larger factor than gender norms for binational couples as they make decisions about what to buy, new research suggests. Samantha Cross, assistant professor of marketing at Iowa State University, and colleague Mary Gilly, a marketing professor at the University of California, Irvine, interviewed binational families for the study, which appears in the Journal of Marketing. The two felt it was important to look specifically at families in which one spouse was born and raised in the US and the other in a different country, to truly see the impact of cultural…
  • How video surveillance could improve hygiene

    Rob Jordan-Stanford
    15 Apr 2014 | 7:06 am
    In an effort to boost health outcomes, researchers use video surveillance to better understand hand-washing hygiene practices of children in developing world settings. One of the best defenses against infectious disease is one of the most simple—hand-washing. Still, despite years of global public awareness campaigns, hand-washing rates remain low. Caregivers of young children in low-income, developing world settings are found to wash their hands only 17 percent of the time after using the toilet. Overall, when students were alone at a hand-cleaning station, hand-cleaning rates averaged 48…
  • For maximum happiness, pick concrete goals

    Clifton B. Parker-Stanford
    15 Apr 2014 | 6:33 am
    Pursuing concrete goals, like making a friend smile, rather than general ones, like making a friend happy, is a path to happiness, say researchers. When you pursue concretely framed goals, your expectations of success are more likely to be met in reality. On the other hand, broad and abstract goals may bring about the dark side of happiness—unrealistic expectations. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of WarwickHigher suicide rates in happy placesUniversity at BuffaloNeed willpower? Watch your favorite TV rerunMcGill UniversityMother Nature issues a wake-up callPenn StateYou'll feel…
 
Log in