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  • Do gut bacteria make flu shots work better?

    Futurity
    Beverly Clark-Emory
    17 Sep 2014 | 12:28 pm
    People treated with an antibiotic before or while receiving a flu shot may have a weakened response to the vaccine, according to a new study with mice. The research shows that mice treated with antibiotics to remove most of their intestinal bacteria or raised under sterile conditions have weakened antibody responses to the seasonal influenza vaccination. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of MinnesotaMedia sways support for HPV vaccineUniversity of QueenslandCell discovery could lead to strep throat vaccineWashington University in St. Louis'Lean' gut microbes fight weight gain, but diet…
  • Asian monsoon may be much older than we thought

    Futurity » Earth and Environment
    Mari Jensen-Arizona
    17 Sep 2014 | 7:28 am
    Scientists have long thought the climate pattern known as the Asian monsoon began 22 to 25 million years ago as a result of the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and the Himalaya Mountains. But new research challenges that idea. The findings show the Asian monsoon existed about 40 million years ago during a period of high atmospheric carbon dioxide and warmer temperatures. “It is surprising,” says lead author Alexis Licht, a research associate in the geosciences department at University of Arizona. “People thought the monsoon started much later.” The monsoon, the largest…
  • Do gut bacteria make flu shots work better?

    Futurity » Health and Medicine
    Beverly Clark-Emory
    17 Sep 2014 | 12:28 pm
    People treated with an antibiotic before or while receiving a flu shot may have a weakened response to the vaccine, according to a new study with mice. The research shows that mice treated with antibiotics to remove most of their intestinal bacteria or raised under sterile conditions have weakened antibody responses to the seasonal influenza vaccination. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of PittsburghPaid sick days would slow down flu at workMichigan State UniversityWorms’ gut bugs go from friend to foeUniversity of MelbourneNative Alaskans and Australians may be vulnerable to new bird…
  • Brain ‘node’ causes deep sleep without sedative

    Futurity » Science and Technology
    Ellen Goldbaum-Buffalo
    17 Sep 2014 | 7:49 am
    Scientists have identified a second “sleep node” in the mammalian brain whose activity appears to be both necessary and sufficient to produce deep sleep. The sleep-promoting circuit located deep in the primitive brainstem reveals how we fall into deep sleep. Published online in Nature Neuroscience, the study demonstrates that fully half of all of the brain’s sleep-promoting activity originates from the parafacial zone (PZ) in the brainstem. The brainstem is a primordial part of the brain that regulates basic functions necessary for survival, such as breathing, blood…
  • Early poverty linked to obesity in women, not men

    Futurity » Society and Culture
    Kimberly Atkins-Texas
    16 Sep 2014 | 12:11 pm
    Adolescent girls from economically disadvantaged families have a high risk of being overweight or obese as adults, new research shows. The same is not true for boys. Using data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, researchers tracked patterns of weight gain among more than 10,000 men and women from high school graduation in 1957 to later career stages in 1993. The findings, published in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, show that economic disadvantage in early life is significantly linked to higher body mass at age 18 and a greater risk of obesity at age 54. The link is the…
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    Futurity

  • Do gut bacteria make flu shots work better?

    Beverly Clark-Emory
    17 Sep 2014 | 12:28 pm
    People treated with an antibiotic before or while receiving a flu shot may have a weakened response to the vaccine, according to a new study with mice. The research shows that mice treated with antibiotics to remove most of their intestinal bacteria or raised under sterile conditions have weakened antibody responses to the seasonal influenza vaccination. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of MinnesotaMedia sways support for HPV vaccineUniversity of QueenslandCell discovery could lead to strep throat vaccineWashington University in St. Louis'Lean' gut microbes fight weight gain, but diet…
  • Brain ‘node’ causes deep sleep without sedative

    Ellen Goldbaum-Buffalo
    17 Sep 2014 | 7:49 am
    Scientists have identified a second “sleep node” in the mammalian brain whose activity appears to be both necessary and sufficient to produce deep sleep. The sleep-promoting circuit located deep in the primitive brainstem reveals how we fall into deep sleep. Published online in Nature Neuroscience, the study demonstrates that fully half of all of the brain’s sleep-promoting activity originates from the parafacial zone (PZ) in the brainstem. The brainstem is a primordial part of the brain that regulates basic functions necessary for survival, such as breathing, blood…
  • How to make carbon thread without ‘clumps’

    Mike Williams-Rice
    17 Sep 2014 | 7:37 am
    Made into fibers, single-walled carbon nanotubes line up like a fistful of raw spaghetti noodles, thanks to a new process. The tricky bit, according to Rice University chemist Angel Martí, is keeping the densely packed nanotubes apart before they’re drawn together into a fiber. Left to their own devices, carbon nanotubes form clumps that are perfectly wrong for turning into the kind of strong, conductive fibers needed for projects ranging from nanoscale electronics to macro-scale power grids. Earlier research at Rice by chemist and chemical engineer Matteo Pasquali, a coauthor of the…
  • Asian monsoon may be much older than we thought

    Mari Jensen-Arizona
    17 Sep 2014 | 7:28 am
    Scientists have long thought the climate pattern known as the Asian monsoon began 22 to 25 million years ago as a result of the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and the Himalaya Mountains. But new research challenges that idea. The findings show the Asian monsoon existed about 40 million years ago during a period of high atmospheric carbon dioxide and warmer temperatures. “It is surprising,” says lead author Alexis Licht, a research associate in the geosciences department at University of Arizona. “People thought the monsoon started much later.” The monsoon, the largest…
  • Early poverty linked to obesity in women, not men

    Kimberly Atkins-Texas
    16 Sep 2014 | 12:11 pm
    Adolescent girls from economically disadvantaged families have a high risk of being overweight or obese as adults, new research shows. The same is not true for boys. Using data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, researchers tracked patterns of weight gain among more than 10,000 men and women from high school graduation in 1957 to later career stages in 1993. The findings, published in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, show that economic disadvantage in early life is significantly linked to higher body mass at age 18 and a greater risk of obesity at age 54. The link is the…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Earth and Environment

  • Asian monsoon may be much older than we thought

    Mari Jensen-Arizona
    17 Sep 2014 | 7:28 am
    Scientists have long thought the climate pattern known as the Asian monsoon began 22 to 25 million years ago as a result of the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and the Himalaya Mountains. But new research challenges that idea. The findings show the Asian monsoon existed about 40 million years ago during a period of high atmospheric carbon dioxide and warmer temperatures. “It is surprising,” says lead author Alexis Licht, a research associate in the geosciences department at University of Arizona. “People thought the monsoon started much later.” The monsoon, the largest…
  • DNA on leaves reveals tree microbiomes

    Jim Barlow-Oregon
    16 Sep 2014 | 10:22 am
    Scientists examined the genetic “fingerprints” on 57 types of trees on an island in Panama and found that each tree species has its own bacterial identity. “This study demonstrates for the first time that host plants from different plant families and with different ecological strategies possess very different microbial communities on their leaves,” says lead author Steven W. Kembel, a former postdoctoral researcher in the University of Oregon’s Institute of Ecology and Evolution who is now a professor of biological sciences at the University of Quebec at…
  • Decoy ladies ‘electrify’ invasive male beetles

    Sara LaJeunesse-Penn State
    16 Sep 2014 | 8:41 am
    New decoys attract male emerald ash borers, but when the males fly in to mate with what they think are females, they get high-voltage zaps instead. “Our new decoy and electrocution process may be useful in managing what the US Department of Agriculture Forest Service claims to be the most destructive forest pest ever seen in North America,” says Michael Domingue, postdoctoral fellow in entomology at Penn State. According to the Forest Service, the emerald ash borer was introduced to the US from China in 2002. Since then, it has spread throughout 24 states and two Canadian…
  • Climate scientists challenge ‘wet gets wetter’ trend

    Peter Rüegg-ETH Zurich
    15 Sep 2014 | 4:12 am
    Scientists have devised a simplified formula to describe one of the consequences of climate change: dry gets drier; wet gets wetter. However, new research challenges assumptions about how universally the formula, known as DDWW, should be applied. Traditional analyses use metrics that can comprehensively describe climate characteristics above the ocean, but are problematic over land. Researchers say scientific and public discourse has overlooked this aspect so far. A new study led by researchers at ETH Zurich takes into account the specific climatic properties of land surfaces, where the…
  • ‘Mixed-up’ farms are better for Costa Rica’s birds

    Bjorn Carey-Stanford
    12 Sep 2014 | 6:44 am
    Scientists counted 120,000 birds from almost 500 species in three types of habitat in Costa Rica for a new study about farming and conservation. The findings were bad and good. The findings arise from a 12-year research project looking at untouched forest reserves; farmlands with multiple crops and small patches of forest; and intensive farmlands consisting of single crops, such as sugar cane or pineapple, with no adjoining forest areas. Not surprisingly, diversified farmlands supported on average 300 million years of evolutionary history fewer than forests. But they retained an astonishing…
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    Futurity » Health and Medicine

  • Do gut bacteria make flu shots work better?

    Beverly Clark-Emory
    17 Sep 2014 | 12:28 pm
    People treated with an antibiotic before or while receiving a flu shot may have a weakened response to the vaccine, according to a new study with mice. The research shows that mice treated with antibiotics to remove most of their intestinal bacteria or raised under sterile conditions have weakened antibody responses to the seasonal influenza vaccination. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of PittsburghPaid sick days would slow down flu at workMichigan State UniversityWorms’ gut bugs go from friend to foeUniversity of MelbourneNative Alaskans and Australians may be vulnerable to new bird…
  • Brain ‘node’ causes deep sleep without sedative

    Ellen Goldbaum-Buffalo
    17 Sep 2014 | 7:49 am
    Scientists have identified a second “sleep node” in the mammalian brain whose activity appears to be both necessary and sufficient to produce deep sleep. The sleep-promoting circuit located deep in the primitive brainstem reveals how we fall into deep sleep. Published online in Nature Neuroscience, the study demonstrates that fully half of all of the brain’s sleep-promoting activity originates from the parafacial zone (PZ) in the brainstem. The brainstem is a primordial part of the brain that regulates basic functions necessary for survival, such as breathing, blood…
  • 23 new gene variants linked to prostate cancer risk

    Leslie Ridgeway-USC
    16 Sep 2014 | 10:16 am
    Scientists can now explain one-third of the inherited risk for prostate cancer, thanks to a large study that identifies 23 new genetic variants associated with an increased risk for the disease. The data study, analyzing more than 87,000 individuals of European, African, Japanese, and Latino ancestry, is the largest of its kind and is the first to combine multiple studies across different ethnic populations. Related Articles On FuturityEmory UniversityButterfly genes can’t yet explain migration routesUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillIs ultrasound the future of male…
  • 5 common worries when fracking comes to town

    Mark Michaud-Rochester
    16 Sep 2014 | 3:35 am
    Communities in parts of the country suitable for what’s commonly called “fracking” may face a number of potential health-related issues. Interviews with community leaders in three states reveal common public health concerns about the practice. Scientists are trying to determine how future research can best address communities’ health questions and inform their decisions. “While this study is just a first step, it clearly indicates that the communities in areas that are considering hydraulic fracturing have many questions and environmental health research…
  • How 2 genes synch your body’s circadian clock

    Mark Derewicz-UNC
    15 Sep 2014 | 1:58 pm
    Researchers have figured out how two genes keep the circadian clocks in all human cells in time and in proper rhythm with the 24-hour day, as well as with the seasons. The discovery has been a “long time coming,” says Aziz Sancar, a professor of biochemistry and biophysics at the UNC School of Medicine. “We’ve known for a while that four proteins were involved in generating daily rhythmicity but not exactly what they did. Now we know how the clock is reset in all cells. So we have a better idea of what to expect if we target these proteins with therapeutics.” In…
 
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    Futurity » Science and Technology

  • Brain ‘node’ causes deep sleep without sedative

    Ellen Goldbaum-Buffalo
    17 Sep 2014 | 7:49 am
    Scientists have identified a second “sleep node” in the mammalian brain whose activity appears to be both necessary and sufficient to produce deep sleep. The sleep-promoting circuit located deep in the primitive brainstem reveals how we fall into deep sleep. Published online in Nature Neuroscience, the study demonstrates that fully half of all of the brain’s sleep-promoting activity originates from the parafacial zone (PZ) in the brainstem. The brainstem is a primordial part of the brain that regulates basic functions necessary for survival, such as breathing, blood…
  • How to make carbon thread without ‘clumps’

    Mike Williams-Rice
    17 Sep 2014 | 7:37 am
    Made into fibers, single-walled carbon nanotubes line up like a fistful of raw spaghetti noodles, thanks to a new process. The tricky bit, according to Rice University chemist Angel Martí, is keeping the densely packed nanotubes apart before they’re drawn together into a fiber. Left to their own devices, carbon nanotubes form clumps that are perfectly wrong for turning into the kind of strong, conductive fibers needed for projects ranging from nanoscale electronics to macro-scale power grids. Earlier research at Rice by chemist and chemical engineer Matteo Pasquali, a coauthor of the…
  • DNA on leaves reveals tree microbiomes

    Jim Barlow-Oregon
    16 Sep 2014 | 10:22 am
    Scientists examined the genetic “fingerprints” on 57 types of trees on an island in Panama and found that each tree species has its own bacterial identity. “This study demonstrates for the first time that host plants from different plant families and with different ecological strategies possess very different microbial communities on their leaves,” says lead author Steven W. Kembel, a former postdoctoral researcher in the University of Oregon’s Institute of Ecology and Evolution who is now a professor of biological sciences at the University of Quebec at…
  • Maybe early Earth wasn’t hellishly hot

    David Salisbury-VU
    16 Sep 2014 | 10:18 am
    Conditions on Earth for the first 500 million years after it formed may have not been as extreme as originally thought. Rather, they might have been surprisingly similar to conditions today, complete with oceans, continents, and active crustal plates. This alternate view of Earth’s first geologic eon, called the Hadean, has gained substantial new support from the first detailed comparison of zircon crystals that formed more than 4 billion years ago with those formed contemporaneously in Iceland, proposed as a possible geological analog for early Earth. Related Articles On…
  • Color display designed for ‘squid skin’ camo

    Jade Boyd-Rice
    16 Sep 2014 | 8:41 am
    Scientists have developed a new full-color display technology that, once refined, could be a critical component for creating artificial “squid skin”—camouflaging metamaterials that can “see” colors and automatically blend into the background. The technology uses aluminum nanoparticles to create the vivid red, blue, and green hues found in today’s top-of-the-line LCD televisions and monitors. The new color display technology is capable of producing dozens of colors, including rich red, green, and blue tones comparable to those found in high-definition LCD…
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    Futurity » Society and Culture

  • Early poverty linked to obesity in women, not men

    Kimberly Atkins-Texas
    16 Sep 2014 | 12:11 pm
    Adolescent girls from economically disadvantaged families have a high risk of being overweight or obese as adults, new research shows. The same is not true for boys. Using data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, researchers tracked patterns of weight gain among more than 10,000 men and women from high school graduation in 1957 to later career stages in 1993. The findings, published in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, show that economic disadvantage in early life is significantly linked to higher body mass at age 18 and a greater risk of obesity at age 54. The link is the…
  • Washington insiders are whiter and well-paid

    Jill Rosen-Johns Hopkins
    16 Sep 2014 | 11:53 am
    New research suggests that America’s unelected officials and bureaucrats may not have enough in common with the people they govern to understand them. A survey of 850 people who work either in the federal government or directly with it reveals that the inside-the-Beltway crowd has very little in common with America at large. View larger. (Credit: Johns Hopkins) Washington insiders, the researchers found, are more likely to be white. They are more educated. Their salaries are higher, they vote more often, and they have more faith in the fairness of elections. They are probably Democrat…
  • Embedded journalists offer dark view of Afghan war

    Matthew Swayne-Penn State
    16 Sep 2014 | 5:57 am
    An analysis of news reports about the war in Afghanistan from 2001 to 2010 shows that reporters at three major US news outlets wrote increasingly negative stories. The negative tone was particularly pronounced in stories posted by reporters embedded in military units. “When the war in Afghanistan started, the tone of the stories that reporters filed was generally neutral,” says Michel Haigh, associate professor of communications at Penn State. “However, over time, and as casualties increased, the coverage became more negative.” Related Articles On FuturityGeorgia…
  • Moral outrage can kill your thirst

    Michael Kennedy-Toronto
    15 Sep 2014 | 8:24 am
    Shady business deals, crimes, and other acts that violate our sense of right and wrong can leave us feeling sick—literally. “The emotion we feel from experiencing a moral violation can profoundly affect our behavior,” says Cindy Chan, an assistant professor at the University of Toronto Scarborough and Rotman School of Management. “It causes us to consume less and highlights a psychological truth that moral violations can, in a manner of speaking, leave a bad taste in our mouths.” Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of ChicagoReliance on emotion fades as we…
  • Wives who like marriage have happier husbands

    Robin Lally-Rutgers
    12 Sep 2014 | 12:54 pm
    Scientists report that the more content a woman is in her marriage, the happier her husband is with his life, regardless of his feelings about their union. “I think it comes down to the fact that when a wife is satisfied with the marriage, she tends to do a lot more for her husband, which has a positive effect on his life,” says Deborah Carr, a professor in the department of sociology at Rutgers. “Men tend to be less vocal about their relationships and their level of marital unhappiness might not be translated to their wives.” Carr and Vicki Freedman, a research…
 
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