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  • ‘Home Sweet Home’ more elusive for African Americans

    Futurity
    Amy Hodges-Rice
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:26 am
    African Americans are 45 percent more likely than whites to switch from owning their homes to renting them. While historical barriers that excluded Black America from the homeowner market for decades have crumbled, other kinds of racial inequality are emerging, making homeownership an increasingly risky investment. A new study examines racial inequality in transitions out of homeownership over the last four decades. The authors used longitudinal household data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics for the period 1968 to 2009, with a study sample of 6,994 non-Hispanic whites and 3,158 black…
  • Why the Appalachian Mountains veer off course

    Futurity » Earth & Environment
    David Barnstone-Rochester
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:57 am
    A dense, underground block of rigid, volcanic rock forced a shift in the 1,500 mile Appalachian mountain chain as it formed millions of years ago. The chain runs along a nearly straight line from Alabama to Newfoundland—except for a curious bend in Pennsylvania and New York State. Scientists had previously known about the volcanic rock structure under the Appalachians, says Cindy Ebinger, professor of Earth and environmental sciences at the University of Rochester. “What we didn’t understand was the size of the structure or its implications for mountain-building processes.”…
  • Brain scans predict PTSD risk after Boston bombing

    Futurity » Health & Medicine
    Doree Armstrong-Washington
    22 Jul 2014 | 7:57 am
    The area of the brain that plays a primary role in emotional learning and the acquisition of fear may hold the key to who is most vulnerable to post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a new study with teenagers following the Boston Marathon bombing in 2013. Prior to the current study, researchers had performed brain scans on Boston-area adolescents for a study on childhood trauma. Then in April 2013 two bombs went off at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, killing three people and injuring hundreds more. Even people who were nowhere near the bombing reported distress about the attack…
  • Why the Appalachian Mountains veer off course

    Futurity » Science & Technology
    David Barnstone-Rochester
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:57 am
    A dense, underground block of rigid, volcanic rock forced a shift in the 1,500 mile Appalachian mountain chain as it formed millions of years ago. The chain runs along a nearly straight line from Alabama to Newfoundland—except for a curious bend in Pennsylvania and New York State. Scientists had previously known about the volcanic rock structure under the Appalachians, says Cindy Ebinger, professor of Earth and environmental sciences at the University of Rochester. “What we didn’t understand was the size of the structure or its implications for mountain-building processes.”…
  • ‘Home Sweet Home’ more elusive for African Americans

    Futurity » Society & Culture
    Amy Hodges-Rice
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:26 am
    African Americans are 45 percent more likely than whites to switch from owning their homes to renting them. While historical barriers that excluded Black America from the homeowner market for decades have crumbled, other kinds of racial inequality are emerging, making homeownership an increasingly risky investment. A new study examines racial inequality in transitions out of homeownership over the last four decades. The authors used longitudinal household data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics for the period 1968 to 2009, with a study sample of 6,994 non-Hispanic whites and 3,158 black…
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    Futurity

  • ‘Home Sweet Home’ more elusive for African Americans

    Amy Hodges-Rice
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:26 am
    African Americans are 45 percent more likely than whites to switch from owning their homes to renting them. While historical barriers that excluded Black America from the homeowner market for decades have crumbled, other kinds of racial inequality are emerging, making homeownership an increasingly risky investment. A new study examines racial inequality in transitions out of homeownership over the last four decades. The authors used longitudinal household data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics for the period 1968 to 2009, with a study sample of 6,994 non-Hispanic whites and 3,158 black…
  • Brain scans predict PTSD risk after Boston bombing

    Doree Armstrong-Washington
    22 Jul 2014 | 7:57 am
    The area of the brain that plays a primary role in emotional learning and the acquisition of fear may hold the key to who is most vulnerable to post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a new study with teenagers following the Boston Marathon bombing in 2013. Prior to the current study, researchers had performed brain scans on Boston-area adolescents for a study on childhood trauma. Then in April 2013 two bombs went off at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, killing three people and injuring hundreds more. Even people who were nowhere near the bombing reported distress about the attack…
  • Future drugs could ‘entomb’ malaria parasite

    Michael Purdy-WUSTL
    22 Jul 2014 | 7:26 am
    Scientists may be able to “entomb” the malaria parasite, which would keep it from tapping into resources from surrounding cells and cause its death. As it invades a red blood cell, the malaria parasite takes part of the host cell’s membrane to build a protective compartment. To grow properly, steal nourishment, and dump waste, the parasite then starts a series of major renovations that transform the red blood cell into a suitable home. But the new research reveals the proteins that make these renovations must pass through a single pore in the parasite’s compartment to…
  • Why the Appalachian Mountains veer off course

    David Barnstone-Rochester
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:57 am
    A dense, underground block of rigid, volcanic rock forced a shift in the 1,500 mile Appalachian mountain chain as it formed millions of years ago. The chain runs along a nearly straight line from Alabama to Newfoundland—except for a curious bend in Pennsylvania and New York State. Scientists had previously known about the volcanic rock structure under the Appalachians, says Cindy Ebinger, professor of Earth and environmental sciences at the University of Rochester. “What we didn’t understand was the size of the structure or its implications for mountain-building processes.”…
  • Is cystic fibrosis two different diseases?

    Anita Srikameswaran-Pittsburgh
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:34 am
    Cystic fibrosis could be considered two diseases—one that can affect multiple organs, including the lungs—and one that doesn’t affect the lungs at all, a new study shows. Research published online in PLOS Genetics shows that nine variants in the gene associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) can lead to pancreatitis, sinusitis, and male infertility, but has no impact on lung function. People with CF inherit from each parent a severely mutated copy of a gene called CFTR, which makes a protein that forms a channel for the movement of chloride molecules in and out of cells that produce…
 
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    Futurity » Earth & Environment

  • Why the Appalachian Mountains veer off course

    David Barnstone-Rochester
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:57 am
    A dense, underground block of rigid, volcanic rock forced a shift in the 1,500 mile Appalachian mountain chain as it formed millions of years ago. The chain runs along a nearly straight line from Alabama to Newfoundland—except for a curious bend in Pennsylvania and New York State. Scientists had previously known about the volcanic rock structure under the Appalachians, says Cindy Ebinger, professor of Earth and environmental sciences at the University of Rochester. “What we didn’t understand was the size of the structure or its implications for mountain-building processes.”…
  • Great Barrier Reef may face a deadly summer

    Caroline Bird-Queensland
    21 Jul 2014 | 11:45 am
    Researchers fear this summer will bring an increase in coral death to the Great Barrier Reef, as the reef is at greater risk than ever from severe weather events. The prediction is based on research into the history of coral death on the reef. The results from that research will help reef managers across the globe reconstruct the history of their reefs and improve management practices. Related Articles On FuturityBrown UniversityClimate spurs 65M years of evolutionGreenhouse gas causing Indian Ocean to rise Duke UniversityWarm-up drives tropical birds to new heightsMichigan State…
  • Satellite tracking puts duck migration on the map

    Randy Mertens-Missouri
    18 Jul 2014 | 6:22 am
    Researchers have used satellite tracking technology to monitor Mallard duck migration from Canada to the American Midwest and back again. Their findings show that 2011-2012 migrations extensively used public and private wetland conservation areas. Scientists now have baseline information for future research into what influences the ducks’ migration flight paths, landing site selection, and foraging behavior. The data will also be useful to conservationists looking for ways to ensure healthy duck populations into the future. The research shows private lands enrolled in the USDA’s…
  • Coral skeletons record changes in ocean temps

    Katie Neith-Caltech
    16 Jul 2014 | 8:38 am
    Just as growth rings from trees offer clues to past climate change, corals can do the same for changes in the ocean. Scientists know that ice sheets wax and wane as the concentration of CO2 decreases and increases in the atmosphere. Researchers believe that the deep ocean—which stores 60 times more inorganic sources of carbon than is found in the atmosphere—must play a vital role in this shift. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of ArizonaClimate 'sponge' sucks plants dry in SouthwestUniversity of FloridaSnorkelers with spears target invasive lionfishUniversity of LeedsPine molecules…
  • Spinach leaves vibrate to kick off photosynthesis

    Nicole Casal Moore-Michigan
    16 Jul 2014 | 7:18 am
    Vibrations deep within spinach leaves enhance the efficiency of photosynthesis—the energy conversion process that powers life on our planet. The discovery could potentially help engineers make more efficient solar cells and energy storage systems. It also injects new evidence into an ongoing “quantum biology” debate over exactly how photosynthesis manages to be so efficient. Through photosynthesis, plants and some bacteria turn sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide into food for themselves and into oxygen for animals to breathe. It’s perhaps the most important biochemical…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Health & Medicine

  • Brain scans predict PTSD risk after Boston bombing

    Doree Armstrong-Washington
    22 Jul 2014 | 7:57 am
    The area of the brain that plays a primary role in emotional learning and the acquisition of fear may hold the key to who is most vulnerable to post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a new study with teenagers following the Boston Marathon bombing in 2013. Prior to the current study, researchers had performed brain scans on Boston-area adolescents for a study on childhood trauma. Then in April 2013 two bombs went off at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, killing three people and injuring hundreds more. Even people who were nowhere near the bombing reported distress about the attack…
  • Future drugs could ‘entomb’ malaria parasite

    Michael Purdy-WUSTL
    22 Jul 2014 | 7:26 am
    Scientists may be able to “entomb” the malaria parasite, which would keep it from tapping into resources from surrounding cells and cause its death. As it invades a red blood cell, the malaria parasite takes part of the host cell’s membrane to build a protective compartment. To grow properly, steal nourishment, and dump waste, the parasite then starts a series of major renovations that transform the red blood cell into a suitable home. But the new research reveals the proteins that make these renovations must pass through a single pore in the parasite’s compartment to…
  • Is cystic fibrosis two different diseases?

    Anita Srikameswaran-Pittsburgh
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:34 am
    Cystic fibrosis could be considered two diseases—one that can affect multiple organs, including the lungs—and one that doesn’t affect the lungs at all, a new study shows. Research published online in PLOS Genetics shows that nine variants in the gene associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) can lead to pancreatitis, sinusitis, and male infertility, but has no impact on lung function. People with CF inherit from each parent a severely mutated copy of a gene called CFTR, which makes a protein that forms a channel for the movement of chloride molecules in and out of cells that produce…
  • Suicides decrease when cigarette tax goes up

    Jim Dryden-WUSTL
    22 Jul 2014 | 5:56 am
    In states that enacted higher taxes on cigarettes and stricter policies on smoking in public places, suicide rates declined up to 15 percent compared to the national average, a new study shows. “Our analysis showed that each dollar increase in cigarette taxes was associated with a 10 percent decrease in suicide risk,” says Richard A. Grucza, associate professor of psychiatry at Washington University in St. Louis. “Indoor smoking bans also were associated with risk reductions.” Related Articles On FuturityDuke UniversityReligious songs may ease black seniors’…
  • Kids teach this robot to play Angry Birds

    Jason Maderer-Georgia Tech
    22 Jul 2014 | 5:30 am
    Using an Android tablet and the video game Angry Birds, children can program a robot to learn new skills. The project is designed as a rehabilitation tool and to help kids with disabilities. Related Articles On FuturityPurdue UniversityTo save energy, computers go for 'good enough'Vanderbilt UniversityiPads help kids with autism learn to speakMichigan State University'Advergames' full of snap, crackle, and caloriesStanford UniversityWho's liable if robots run amok?Stanford UniversityIn biotic game, Pac-Man's a living cellCarnegie Mellon UniversityHow to turn robots into social butterflies…
 
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    Futurity » Science & Technology

  • Why the Appalachian Mountains veer off course

    David Barnstone-Rochester
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:57 am
    A dense, underground block of rigid, volcanic rock forced a shift in the 1,500 mile Appalachian mountain chain as it formed millions of years ago. The chain runs along a nearly straight line from Alabama to Newfoundland—except for a curious bend in Pennsylvania and New York State. Scientists had previously known about the volcanic rock structure under the Appalachians, says Cindy Ebinger, professor of Earth and environmental sciences at the University of Rochester. “What we didn’t understand was the size of the structure or its implications for mountain-building processes.”…
  • Kids teach this robot to play Angry Birds

    Jason Maderer-Georgia Tech
    22 Jul 2014 | 5:30 am
    Using an Android tablet and the video game Angry Birds, children can program a robot to learn new skills. The project is designed as a rehabilitation tool and to help kids with disabilities. Related Articles On FuturityDuke UniversityDaily texts could help shed those extra poundsIowa State UniversityViolent games strongly linked to youth crimeUniversity of MichiganApp analyzes your voice for mood swingsBrown UniversityParalyzed woman uses mind to move robot armStanford UniversityWhy scientists sent 600 black ants into space Michigan State UniversityXbox bonus? Kids who play are more creative…
  • Baby’s brain ‘rehearses’ before first words

    Molly McElroy-UW
    21 Jul 2014 | 7:24 am
    New research shows that speech sounds stimulate areas of an infant’s brain that coordinate and plan for the physical movements needed for speech. Infants can tell the difference between sounds of all languages until about 8 months of age when their brains start to focus only on the sounds they hear around them. It’s been unclear how this transition occurs, but social interactions and caregivers’ use of exaggerated “parentese” style of speech seem to help. Related Articles On FuturityStony Brook UniversityDinosaurs had 'flight-ready' bird brainsUniversity at…
  • Patients tell more secrets to virtual humans

    Tanya Abrams-USC
    21 Jul 2014 | 6:16 am
    Patients are more willing to disclose personal information to virtual humans than to actual ones, likely because computers don’t make judgments or look down on people the way another human might. The findings show promise for people suffering from post-traumatic stress and other mental anguish, says Gale Lucas, a social psychologist at University of Southern California’s Institute for Creative Technologies. Virtual human “Ellie” gave participants a sense of anonymity, making them more willing to disclose personal information in a private setting without fear of…
  • Walking on all fours isn’t ‘backward’ evolution

    Kimberly Atkins-Texas
    21 Jul 2014 | 5:37 am
    Five siblings in a family who live in a remote corner of Turkey walk exclusively on their hands and feet. Since 2005, scientists have debated the nature of their disability, with speculation that they represent a “backward” stage of evolution. The study, published online this month in PLOS ONE, shows that contrary to previous claims, people with the family members’ condition, called Uner Tan Syndrome (UTS), do not walk in the diagonal pattern characteristic of nonhuman primates such as apes and monkeys. Adaptive or devolving? According to a theory developed by Uner Tan of…
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    Futurity » Society & Culture

  • ‘Home Sweet Home’ more elusive for African Americans

    Amy Hodges-Rice
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:26 am
    African Americans are 45 percent more likely than whites to switch from owning their homes to renting them. While historical barriers that excluded Black America from the homeowner market for decades have crumbled, other kinds of racial inequality are emerging, making homeownership an increasingly risky investment. A new study examines racial inequality in transitions out of homeownership over the last four decades. The authors used longitudinal household data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics for the period 1968 to 2009, with a study sample of 6,994 non-Hispanic whites and 3,158 black…
  • Suicides decrease when cigarette tax goes up

    Jim Dryden-WUSTL
    22 Jul 2014 | 5:56 am
    In states that enacted higher taxes on cigarettes and stricter policies on smoking in public places, suicide rates declined up to 15 percent compared to the national average, a new study shows. “Our analysis showed that each dollar increase in cigarette taxes was associated with a 10 percent decrease in suicide risk,” says Richard A. Grucza, associate professor of psychiatry at Washington University in St. Louis. “Indoor smoking bans also were associated with risk reductions.” Related Articles On FuturityDuke UniversityTeen smoking addiction linked to genesNew York…
  • Switzerland tops list of innovative economies

    Syl Kacapyr-Cornell
    21 Jul 2014 | 6:48 am
    Switzerland has the most innovative economy, followed by the United Kingdom and Sweden, according to this year’s Global Innovation Index—a survey of 143 countries that uses 81 indicators to gauge innovation capabilities and measurable results. The United States came in sixth. The study was released July 18 in Sydney, Australia at the B20 gathering of international business leaders. Related Articles On FuturityPrinceton UniversityBig banks loom over finance ‘ecosystem’Columbia UniversityCan bigger desks make us dishonest?Washington University in St. LouisRural policy may stunt China's…
  • Culture sets the tone when people ‘hear voices’

    Clifton B. Parker-Stanford
    21 Jul 2014 | 6:42 am
    People suffering from schizophrenia may hear “voices”—auditory hallucinations—differently depending on their cultural context, according to new research. Anthropologist Tanya Luhrmann and her colleagues find that voice-hearing experiences of people with serious psychotic disorders in the United States hear voices that are harsh and threatening, while in Africa and India, they are more benign and playful. This may have clinical implications for how to treat people with schizophrenia, she suggests. The experience of hearing voices is complex and varies from person to person,…
  • Your ‘bestie’ is probably your distant cousin

    Jim Shelton-Yale
    18 Jul 2014 | 8:33 am
    People tend to pick friends who resemble them genetically. In fact, according to a new study, close friends are the genetic equivalent of fourth cousins, on average. “This gives us a deeper accounting of the origins of friendship,” says Nicholas Christakis, professor of sociology, evolutionary biology, and medicine at Yale University. “Not only do we form ties with people superficially like ourselves, we form ties with people who are like us on a deep genetic level. They’re like our kin, though they’re not.” (Credit: jennifer yin/Flickr) Christakis and…
 
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