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  • You can join the 1 percent, but you can’t stay

    Futurity » Society and Culture
    Neil Schoenherr-WUSTL
    29 Jan 2015 | 10:37 am
    A typical American has a one in nine shot of hitting the jackpot and joining the wealthiest 1 percent for at least one year of his or her working life, say researchers. There’s bad news, too, however: only an elite few get to stay in that economic stratosphere—and nonwhite workers remain among those who face far longer odds. “Rather than static groups that experience continual high levels of economic attainment, there would appear to be more movement into and out of these income levels,” write Mark Rank, a professor of social welfare at the Brown School at Washington…
  • Why is California crawling with hot pink sea slugs?

    Futurity
    Julie Cohen-UC Santa Barbara
    31 Jan 2015 | 7:02 am
    Along the central and northern California coast, tide pools are crawling with inch-long sea slugs called Hopkins’ Rose. Warm ocean temperatures have triggered a population explosion of the bright pink creatures. The Hopkins’ Rose nudibranch (Okenia rosacea) is common to Southern California but found only sporadically in Central California and rarely north of San Francisco. However, in the past few weeks, researchers have reported densities of up to dozens per square meter in tide pools from San Luis Obispo to Humboldt counties. These are the highest numbers and northernmost…
  • Why is California crawling with hot pink sea slugs?

    Futurity » Earth and Environment
    Julie Cohen-UC Santa Barbara
    31 Jan 2015 | 7:02 am
    Along the central and northern California coast, tide pools are crawling with inch-long sea slugs called Hopkins’ Rose. Warm ocean temperatures have triggered a population explosion of the bright pink creatures. The Hopkins’ Rose nudibranch (Okenia rosacea) is common to Southern California but found only sporadically in Central California and rarely north of San Francisco. However, in the past few weeks, researchers have reported densities of up to dozens per square meter in tide pools from San Luis Obispo to Humboldt counties. These are the highest numbers and northernmost…
  • Is this kid too young for football?

    Futurity » Health and Medicine
    Barbara Moran-Boston University
    30 Jan 2015 | 6:03 am
    As the 100 million viewers tuning in to this Sunday’s Super Bowl can attest, Americans adore football. And for many, the love affair begins in childhood. But a new study points to a possible increased risk of cognitive impairment from playing youth football. Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine found that former National Football League (NFL) players who participated in tackle football before the age of 12 are more likely to have memory and thinking problems as adults. The study contradicts conventional wisdom that children’s more plastic brains might recover from…
  • Gender differences are smaller than we think

    Futurity » Science and Technology
    Angie Hunt-Iowa State
    30 Jan 2015 | 7:56 am
    Although gender plays a big part in our identities, new research finds men and woman aren’t as different as we tend to think. Gender stereotypes can influence beliefs and create the impression that the differences are large, says Zlatan Krizan, an associate professor of psychology at Iowa State University. To separate fact from fiction, Krizan and colleagues conducted a meta-synthesis of more than 100 meta-analyses of gender differences. Combined, the studies they aggregated included more than 12 million people. Their report, published in American Psychologist, found an almost 80…
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  • Why is California crawling with hot pink sea slugs?

    Julie Cohen-UC Santa Barbara
    31 Jan 2015 | 7:02 am
    Along the central and northern California coast, tide pools are crawling with inch-long sea slugs called Hopkins’ Rose. Warm ocean temperatures have triggered a population explosion of the bright pink creatures. The Hopkins’ Rose nudibranch (Okenia rosacea) is common to Southern California but found only sporadically in Central California and rarely north of San Francisco. However, in the past few weeks, researchers have reported densities of up to dozens per square meter in tide pools from San Luis Obispo to Humboldt counties. These are the highest numbers and northernmost…
  • Will the Great Lakes face a ‘killer shrimp’ invasion?

    Melody Enguix-McGill
    30 Jan 2015 | 9:09 am
    More non-native species have invaded the Great Lakes than any other freshwater ecosystem in the world. Efforts are in place to stem the tide of invasion threats, but the lakes remain vulnerable, say scientists. They’ve issued a forecast for the next 50 years, including new waves of invasions and specific species that could show up. Over the past two centuries, more than 180 non-native species have been recorded in the Great Lakes and the rivers that flow into them. Nearly 20 percent of these species are considered to be harmful ecologically and economically, posing threats to the…
  • Gender differences are smaller than we think

    Angie Hunt-Iowa State
    30 Jan 2015 | 7:56 am
    Although gender plays a big part in our identities, new research finds men and woman aren’t as different as we tend to think. Gender stereotypes can influence beliefs and create the impression that the differences are large, says Zlatan Krizan, an associate professor of psychology at Iowa State University. To separate fact from fiction, Krizan and colleagues conducted a meta-synthesis of more than 100 meta-analyses of gender differences. Combined, the studies they aggregated included more than 12 million people. Their report, published in American Psychologist, found an almost 80…
  • This is how phishing scams trick you

    Patricia Donovan-Buffalo
    30 Jan 2015 | 6:16 am
    After all the warnings, how do people still fall for email “phishing” scams? New research shows how certain strategies on the part of the scammers can affect recipients’ thinking and increase their chances of falling victim. “Information-rich” emails include graphics, logos, and other brand markers that communicate authenticity, says study coauthor Arun Vishwanath, professor of communication at the University at Buffalo. “In addition,” he says, “the text is carefully framed to sound personal, arrest attention, and invoke fear. It often will…
  • Is this kid too young for football?

    Barbara Moran-Boston University
    30 Jan 2015 | 6:03 am
    As the 100 million viewers tuning in to this Sunday’s Super Bowl can attest, Americans adore football. And for many, the love affair begins in childhood. But a new study points to a possible increased risk of cognitive impairment from playing youth football. Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine found that former National Football League (NFL) players who participated in tackle football before the age of 12 are more likely to have memory and thinking problems as adults. The study contradicts conventional wisdom that children’s more plastic brains might recover from…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Earth and Environment

  • Why is California crawling with hot pink sea slugs?

    Julie Cohen-UC Santa Barbara
    31 Jan 2015 | 7:02 am
    Along the central and northern California coast, tide pools are crawling with inch-long sea slugs called Hopkins’ Rose. Warm ocean temperatures have triggered a population explosion of the bright pink creatures. The Hopkins’ Rose nudibranch (Okenia rosacea) is common to Southern California but found only sporadically in Central California and rarely north of San Francisco. However, in the past few weeks, researchers have reported densities of up to dozens per square meter in tide pools from San Luis Obispo to Humboldt counties. These are the highest numbers and northernmost…
  • Will the Great Lakes face a ‘killer shrimp’ invasion?

    Melody Enguix-McGill
    30 Jan 2015 | 9:09 am
    More non-native species have invaded the Great Lakes than any other freshwater ecosystem in the world. Efforts are in place to stem the tide of invasion threats, but the lakes remain vulnerable, say scientists. They’ve issued a forecast for the next 50 years, including new waves of invasions and specific species that could show up. Over the past two centuries, more than 180 non-native species have been recorded in the Great Lakes and the rivers that flow into them. Nearly 20 percent of these species are considered to be harmful ecologically and economically, posing threats to the…
  • Diesel generators cut heat but spew emissions

    Blaine Friedlander-Cornell
    29 Jan 2015 | 7:44 am
    A way to ease peak demand on the energy grid could help explain exceedingly high ozone concentrations in the Northeast region of the US. A new study finds that using diesel backup generators in non-emergency situations triggers rising atmospheric ozone concentrations due to additional nitrogen oxide emissions. During hazy, hot summer days, power systems in the Northeast experience close-to-capacity demand, putting pressure on the electricity grid. Peak electricity demand also leads to high emissions, especially nitrogen oxides, which are precursors to tropospheric ozone pollution.
  • Are tiny crystals the next big thing in solar cells?

    Fabio Bergamin-ETH Zurich
    28 Jan 2015 | 12:49 pm
    Tomorrow’s solar cells will likely be made of nanocrystals. Compared with silicon in today’s solar cells, these tiny crystals can absorb a larger fraction of the solar light spectrum. But, until now, the physics of electron transport in this complex material was not understood, making it impossible to systematically engineer better nanocrystal-composites. “These solar cells contain layers of many individual nano-sized crystals, bound together by a molecular glue. Within this nanocrystal composite, the electrons do not flow as well as needed for commercial…
  • Warming seas may stop turtles from tanning

    Tim Lucas-Duke
    26 Jan 2015 | 6:23 am
    Rising sea temperatures could keep green sea turtles from hanging out on the beach. Basking on sunny beaches helps the threatened turtles regulate their body temperature and supports their immune systems and digestion, researchers say. An analysis of six years of turtle surveys and 24 years of satellite data shows the turtles bask more often each year when sea surface temperatures drop. If global warming trends continue, this behavior may cease globally by 2102. In Hawaii, where the study was primarily focused, green turtles might stop basking much earlier, by 2039. The findings are…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Health and Medicine

  • Is this kid too young for football?

    Barbara Moran-Boston University
    30 Jan 2015 | 6:03 am
    As the 100 million viewers tuning in to this Sunday’s Super Bowl can attest, Americans adore football. And for many, the love affair begins in childhood. But a new study points to a possible increased risk of cognitive impairment from playing youth football. Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine found that former National Football League (NFL) players who participated in tackle football before the age of 12 are more likely to have memory and thinking problems as adults. The study contradicts conventional wisdom that children’s more plastic brains might recover from…
  • These 2 genes trigger deadly ovarian cancer

    Mark Derewicz-UNC
    29 Jan 2015 | 12:05 pm
    By creating the first mouse model of aggressive ovarian cancer, researchers say they may have uncovered a better way to diagnose and treat it. “It’s an extremely aggressive model of the disease, which is how this form of ovarian cancer presents in women,” says study leader Terry Magnuson, a professor and chair of genetics at the UNC School of Medicine. Magnuson’s team discovered how two genes interact to trigger the cancer and then spur on its development. Not all mouse models of human diseases provide accurate depictions of the human condition. Magnuson’s mouse…
  • ‘Safe’ pesticide could be an ADHD culprit

    Robin Lally-Rutgers
    29 Jan 2015 | 8:25 am
    New research suggests that a commonly used pesticide found on lawns, golf courses, and vegetable crops may raise the risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The pesticide may alter the development of the brain’s dopamine system—which is responsible for emotional expression and cognitive function. Mice exposed to the pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin in utero and through lactation exhibited several features of ADHD, including dysfunctional dopamine signaling in the brain, including hyperactivity, attention deficits, and impulsive-like behavior. Attention deficit…
  • Donor tissue for joint repair stays fresh for 60 days

    Nathan Hurst-Missouri
    29 Jan 2015 | 8:09 am
    Currently doctors have to throw away more than 80 percent of donated tissue used for joint replacements because the tissue does not survive long enough to be transplanted. A new way to preserve the tissue means it can last much longer: up to 60 days instead of less than 30. “It’s a game-changer,” says James Stannard, a professor of orthopedic surgery at the University of Missouri School of Medicine. “The benefit to patients is that more graft material will be available and it will be of better quality. This will allow us as surgeons to provide a more natural joint…
  • Lead paint may still lurk on the porch

    Mark Michaud-Rochester
    29 Jan 2015 | 6:37 am
    Housing regulations have been key to lowering rates of lead poisoning, but new research finds that porches may remain a danger to children’s health. “This study shows that porches are an important potential source of lead exposure for children,” says study coauthor Katrina Korfmacher, director of the Community Outreach and Engagement Core of the University of Rochester Medical Center. “It is becoming clear that porch dust lead can be effectively reduced through repairs, cleaning, and maintenance.” Lead is a neurotoxin and has significant health, learning, and…
 
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    Futurity » Science and Technology

  • Gender differences are smaller than we think

    Angie Hunt-Iowa State
    30 Jan 2015 | 7:56 am
    Although gender plays a big part in our identities, new research finds men and woman aren’t as different as we tend to think. Gender stereotypes can influence beliefs and create the impression that the differences are large, says Zlatan Krizan, an associate professor of psychology at Iowa State University. To separate fact from fiction, Krizan and colleagues conducted a meta-synthesis of more than 100 meta-analyses of gender differences. Combined, the studies they aggregated included more than 12 million people. Their report, published in American Psychologist, found an almost 80…
  • ‘Parasitic’ genes let mammals evolve pregnancy

    Kevin Jiang-U. Chicago
    30 Jan 2015 | 5:18 am
    Transposons, also called “jumping genes,” were a key part of the evolution of pregnancy among mammals, report scientists. They found thousands of genes that evolved to be expressed in the uterus in early mammals, including many that are important for maternal-fetal communication and suppression of the immune system. “…I guess we owe the evolution of pregnancy to what are effectively genomic parasites” Surprisingly, these genes appear to have been recruited and repurposed from other tissue types by transposons—ancient mobile genetic elements sometimes thought of…
  • Why Mars has 2 wildly different hemispheres

    Peter Rüegg-ETH Zurich
    29 Jan 2015 | 10:39 am
    The two hemispheres of Mars are dramatically different from each other—a characteristic not seen on any other planet in our solar system. Non-volcanic, flat lowlands characterize the northern hemisphere, while highlands punctuated by countless volcanoes extend across the southern hemisphere. Scientists can’t agree on what caused the differences, but ETH Zurich geophysicist Giovanni Leone is offering a new explanation. Leone and colleagues have concluded that a large celestial object must have smashed into the Martian south pole in the early history of the solar system. Their computer…
  • Are tiny crystals the next big thing in solar cells?

    Fabio Bergamin-ETH Zurich
    28 Jan 2015 | 12:49 pm
    Tomorrow’s solar cells will likely be made of nanocrystals. Compared with silicon in today’s solar cells, these tiny crystals can absorb a larger fraction of the solar light spectrum. But, until now, the physics of electron transport in this complex material was not understood, making it impossible to systematically engineer better nanocrystal-composites. “These solar cells contain layers of many individual nano-sized crystals, bound together by a molecular glue. Within this nanocrystal composite, the electrons do not flow as well as needed for commercial…
  • These rings are 200 times bigger than Saturn’s

    Leonor Sierra-Rochester
    28 Jan 2015 | 12:18 pm
    Scientists have discovered what appears to be a young giant exoplanet with an enormous ring system—much larger and heavier than the system around Saturn. The rings around J1407b are so large that if they were put around Saturn, we could see the rings at dusk with our own eyes. (Credit: M. Kenworthy/Leiden) The 30 or more rings around J1407b are each tens of millions of kilometers in diameter. If these rings were around Saturn, they would be visible at night from Earth. “You could think of it as kind of a super Saturn,” says Eric Mamajek, professor of physics and astronomy at…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Society and Culture

  • This is how phishing scams trick you

    Patricia Donovan-Buffalo
    30 Jan 2015 | 6:16 am
    After all the warnings, how do people still fall for email “phishing” scams? New research shows how certain strategies on the part of the scammers can affect recipients’ thinking and increase their chances of falling victim. “Information-rich” emails include graphics, logos, and other brand markers that communicate authenticity, says study coauthor Arun Vishwanath, professor of communication at the University at Buffalo. “In addition,” he says, “the text is carefully framed to sound personal, arrest attention, and invoke fear. It often will…
  • Globalization’s first wave wasn’t all positive

    Tracy Evans-Warwick
    30 Jan 2015 | 5:21 am
    150 years ago, the steamship made international trade possible for many countries. Only a few countries benefited from this first wave of globalization, however. Most ended up worse-off, according to a new study. This is proof that international trade doesn’t automatically lead to economic prosperity, says Luigi Pascali, a professor of economics in the Centre for Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE) at the University of Warwick. Until the mid-1800s, the distribution of goods around the world was determined by sailing vessels, which relied on global wind patterns to get from…
  • You can join the 1 percent, but you can’t stay

    Neil Schoenherr-WUSTL
    29 Jan 2015 | 10:37 am
    A typical American has a one in nine shot of hitting the jackpot and joining the wealthiest 1 percent for at least one year of his or her working life, say researchers. There’s bad news, too, however: only an elite few get to stay in that economic stratosphere—and nonwhite workers remain among those who face far longer odds. “Rather than static groups that experience continual high levels of economic attainment, there would appear to be more movement into and out of these income levels,” write Mark Rank, a professor of social welfare at the Brown School at Washington…
  • Big storms can make or break politicians

    Gerry Everding-WUSTL
    28 Jan 2015 | 1:10 pm
    Why were preparations for “Winter Storm Juno” so intense? Politics, says Andrew Reeves, a political scientist who studies the politics of natural disasters. “The current snow storm is providing an unexpected challenge to mayors, governors, and other state and local officials throughout the mid-Atlantic and New England,” he says. “Not only does a major snow storm launch an unexpected stress test on already strained budgets, it lets us observe leaders reacting to unexpected crises without much lead time.” Describing the big snow storm as a “pop…
  • Why we need satire when times are tough

    Matthew Swayne-Penn State
    28 Jan 2015 | 9:43 am
    Satire isn’t just entertainment, according to the authors of a new book. It’s a vital function of democratic society and a way to broach taboo subjects, especially in times of crisis. “Robust satire is often a sign of crisis and the ability to share and consume it is a sign of a free society,” says Sophia McClennen, professor of international affairs and comparative literature and director of Penn State’s Center for Global Studies. “We see satire emerge when political discourse is in crisis and when it becomes important to use satirical comedy to put…
 
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