Futurity

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Knowing how you feel could have health perks

    Futurity
    David Orenstein-Brown
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:47 am
    People who pay more attention to their feelings and experiences tend to have better cardiovascular health, a new study suggests. As reported in the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, researchers found a significant association between self-reported “dispositional mindfulness” and better scores on four of seven cardiovascular health indicators, as well as a composite overall health score. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of Southern CaliforniaWhy meat-eating humans outlive apesJohns Hopkins UniversityHeart health: Add avocado to holiday mealsStem cells to blood…
  • Not all scientists are great at sharing

    Futurity » Earth and Environment
    Layne Cameron-Michigan State
    22 Oct 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Astronomers and geneticists are good at sharing, report researchers, who say ecologists may need a brush-up on the concept. A study in the current issue of Bioscience explores the paradox that although ecologists share findings via scientific journals, they do not share the data on which the studies are built, says Patricia Soranno, a fisheries and wildlife professor at Michigan State University and coauthor of the paper. “One reason for not sharing data is the fear of being scooped by another scientist; but if all data are available, then everyone is on the same playing field, there…
  • Knowing how you feel could have health perks

    Futurity » Health and Medicine
    David Orenstein-Brown
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:47 am
    People who pay more attention to their feelings and experiences tend to have better cardiovascular health, a new study suggests. As reported in the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, researchers found a significant association between self-reported “dispositional mindfulness” and better scores on four of seven cardiovascular health indicators, as well as a composite overall health score. Related Articles On FuturityMcGill UniversityStoves raise heart risks for women in rural ChinaMonash UniversityBlood clot buster in atomic detailUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel…
  • There’s zero chance you’ll see a megalodon

    Futurity » Science and Technology
    Stephenie Livingston-Florida
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:16 am
    Scientists are officially debunking the myth that megalodon sharks still exist. The whale-eating monsters became extinct about 2.6 million years ago. “I was drawn to the study of Carcharocles megalodon’s extinction because it is fundamental to know when species became extinct to then begin to understand the causes and consequences of such an event,” says Catalina Pimiento, a doctoral candidate at the Florida Museum of Natural History at University of Florida. Catalina Pimiento measures a megalodon shark tooth at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. (Credit:…
  • Not all scientists are great at sharing

    Futurity » Society and Culture
    Layne Cameron-Michigan State
    22 Oct 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Astronomers and geneticists are good at sharing, report researchers, who say ecologists may need a brush-up on the concept. A study in the current issue of Bioscience explores the paradox that although ecologists share findings via scientific journals, they do not share the data on which the studies are built, says Patricia Soranno, a fisheries and wildlife professor at Michigan State University and coauthor of the paper. “One reason for not sharing data is the fear of being scooped by another scientist; but if all data are available, then everyone is on the same playing field, there…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity

  • Knowing how you feel could have health perks

    David Orenstein-Brown
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:47 am
    People who pay more attention to their feelings and experiences tend to have better cardiovascular health, a new study suggests. As reported in the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, researchers found a significant association between self-reported “dispositional mindfulness” and better scores on four of seven cardiovascular health indicators, as well as a composite overall health score. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of Southern CaliforniaWhy meat-eating humans outlive apesJohns Hopkins UniversityHeart health: Add avocado to holiday mealsStem cells to blood…
  • There’s zero chance you’ll see a megalodon

    Stephenie Livingston-Florida
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:16 am
    Scientists are officially debunking the myth that megalodon sharks still exist. The whale-eating monsters became extinct about 2.6 million years ago. “I was drawn to the study of Carcharocles megalodon’s extinction because it is fundamental to know when species became extinct to then begin to understand the causes and consequences of such an event,” says Catalina Pimiento, a doctoral candidate at the Florida Museum of Natural History at University of Florida. Catalina Pimiento measures a megalodon shark tooth at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. (Credit:…
  • Approved therapy tested on autoimmune diseases

    Lucy Handford-Monash
    23 Oct 2014 | 8:44 am
    Laboratory tests of an approved therapeutic suggest it may treat symptoms of autoimmune diseases such as type-1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. These diseases occur when a group of immune cells called pro-inflammatory T-effector cells become sensitized to specific cells in the body, identifying them as foreign and attacking them as if they were invading bacteria. “IGF-1 is already an approved therapeutic and has been tested in many different settings. That means it will be much easier to start clinical trials.” This “friendly fire” goes unchecked due to the failing of…
  • Can subliminal messages improve old age?

    Michael Greenwood-Yale
    23 Oct 2014 | 8:22 am
    Subliminal messages containing positive stereotypes about aging can improve older adults’ physical functioning for several weeks, according to a new study. Researchers used a new intervention method to examine for the first time whether exposure to positive age stereotypes could weaken negative age stereotypes and their effects over time, and lead to healthier outcomes. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of KansasDepression can be deadly for older AmericansUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillMany diseases link to handful of genome 'hotspots'Duke UniversityHistory predicts…
  • The perfect gap turns nanoparticles into sensors

    David Scott-Melbourne
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:16 am
    Scientists have figured out the optimal gap needed between two gold nanoparticles to turn them into optical antennae. When the gap is optimal, the particles can concentrate light shining on them into the tiny regions between the gap. Researchers can use the light to sense molecules inside the space. Related Articles On FuturityStanford UniversityFirst ‘top to bottom’ carbon solar cellCalifornia Institute of TechnologySensor for asteroid camera passes critical testUniversity of MichiganInvisible 'knife' focuses sound waves to slice “Up until now there were two competing theories…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Earth and Environment

  • Not all scientists are great at sharing

    Layne Cameron-Michigan State
    22 Oct 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Astronomers and geneticists are good at sharing, report researchers, who say ecologists may need a brush-up on the concept. A study in the current issue of Bioscience explores the paradox that although ecologists share findings via scientific journals, they do not share the data on which the studies are built, says Patricia Soranno, a fisheries and wildlife professor at Michigan State University and coauthor of the paper. “One reason for not sharing data is the fear of being scooped by another scientist; but if all data are available, then everyone is on the same playing field, there…
  • Terrified prey change where plants grow in savannas

    Gigi Marino-Florida
    17 Oct 2014 | 9:46 am
    The classic food chain on the savanna may be more complicated than prey eats plants and predator eats prey. Researchers conducted fieldwork at the Mpala Research Centre in Laikipia, Kenya, 100 kilometers north of the equator in a savanna. “Where the prey do and do not go, it turns out, strongly influences the types of plants you find in these habitats.” The team looked at three components of the ecosystem: the predators, including leopards and wild dogs; the leaf-eating impala; and two species of acacia trees, one defended by more thorns than the other. “We’d like to…
  • Diving birds at risk without fish for dinner

    Kat Kerlin-UC Davis
    17 Oct 2014 | 7:57 am
    Diving birds that winter in the Salish Sea (between British Columbia and Washington) were 11 times more likely to be in decline than non-diving birds, a new study finds. Also, populations of diving birds that rely on forage fish, such as Pacific herring, are 16 times more likely to decline than those with more varied diets. The study lends credence to what scientists have long suspected: “If you want to recover birds, you need to recover the food that they’re eating,” says coauthor Joe Gaydos, a wildlife veterinarian at School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of…
  • Alpine butterflies survived by working their ‘net’

    Kat Kerlin-UC Davis
    17 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    Good connections helped alpine butterflies survive a serious population crash in 2003 that killed off more than 60 percent of the population. The alpine butterfly lives in high-altitude meadows of the Rocky Mountains. A new study focused on a network of them living along three ridge tops in Alberta, Canada. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of PennsylvaniaCaterpillars use fake eyes to stare down birdsVanderbilt UniversityMicrobes sway evolution by killing hybrid hostsUniversity of Colorado at BoulderThreatened pikas hang on in the RockiesPrinceton UniversityNo explosion of skeletal…
  • This fusion reactor could be cheaper than coal

    Michelle Ma-Washington
    16 Oct 2014 | 11:59 am
    Fusion energy almost sounds too good to be true—zero greenhouse gas emissions, no long-lived radioactive waste, a nearly unlimited fuel supply. Perhaps the biggest roadblock to adopting fusion energy is that the economics haven’t penciled out. Fusion power designs aren’t cheap enough to outperform systems that use fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas. University of Washington engineers hope to change that. They have designed a concept for a fusion reactor that, when scaled up to the size of a large electrical power plant, would rival costs for a new coal-fired plant with…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Health and Medicine

  • Knowing how you feel could have health perks

    David Orenstein-Brown
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:47 am
    People who pay more attention to their feelings and experiences tend to have better cardiovascular health, a new study suggests. As reported in the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, researchers found a significant association between self-reported “dispositional mindfulness” and better scores on four of seven cardiovascular health indicators, as well as a composite overall health score. Related Articles On FuturityMcGill UniversityStoves raise heart risks for women in rural ChinaMonash UniversityBlood clot buster in atomic detailUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel…
  • Approved therapy tested on autoimmune diseases

    Lucy Handford-Monash
    23 Oct 2014 | 8:44 am
    Laboratory tests of an approved therapeutic suggest it may treat symptoms of autoimmune diseases such as type-1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. These diseases occur when a group of immune cells called pro-inflammatory T-effector cells become sensitized to specific cells in the body, identifying them as foreign and attacking them as if they were invading bacteria. “IGF-1 is already an approved therapeutic and has been tested in many different settings. That means it will be much easier to start clinical trials.” This “friendly fire” goes unchecked due to the failing of…
  • Can subliminal messages improve old age?

    Michael Greenwood-Yale
    23 Oct 2014 | 8:22 am
    Subliminal messages containing positive stereotypes about aging can improve older adults’ physical functioning for several weeks, according to a new study. Researchers used a new intervention method to examine for the first time whether exposure to positive age stereotypes could weaken negative age stereotypes and their effects over time, and lead to healthier outcomes. Related Articles On FuturityBrown UniversitySeniors in US South get risky meds more oftenBrown UniversityLoss of genetic control in aging may be flexibleCornell UniversityLonely hearts suffer effects of agingPenn…
  • Maintenance beats detox for opioid addicts

    Karen Peart-Yale
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:13 am
    Buprenorphine maintenance therapy works better than detox for treating patients with prescription opioid dependence in primary care, new research shows. Prescription opioid dependence has been increasing for the last 15 years and now surpasses heroin dependence. Doctors are also writing more prescriptions for pain management, which has led to higher experimentation and addiction rates, according to lead author David Fiellin, professor of internal medicine at Yale School of Medicine. “Primary care physicians lack evidence-based guidelines to decide between detoxification or providing…
  • What the 1918 ‘Spanish flu’ tells us about Ebola

    Kristen Parker-Michigan State
    23 Oct 2014 | 2:59 am
    The 1918 influenza virus killed 50 million people worldwide, and now scientists are hoping to apply the lessons learned to fight diseases like Ebola. The pandemic, also known as the “Spanish flu,” claimed 675,000 lives in nine months in the United States alone. Of the total killed, as many as 20 million were in India. Related Articles On FuturityEmory UniversityVaccine responds to flu's 'original sin' trickCalifornia Institute of TechnologyPotent antibodies protect mice from HIVUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillObesity up, life expectancy downUniversity of MissouriTo…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Science and Technology

  • There’s zero chance you’ll see a megalodon

    Stephenie Livingston-Florida
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:16 am
    Scientists are officially debunking the myth that megalodon sharks still exist. The whale-eating monsters became extinct about 2.6 million years ago. “I was drawn to the study of Carcharocles megalodon’s extinction because it is fundamental to know when species became extinct to then begin to understand the causes and consequences of such an event,” says Catalina Pimiento, a doctoral candidate at the Florida Museum of Natural History at University of Florida. Catalina Pimiento measures a megalodon shark tooth at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. (Credit:…
  • The perfect gap turns nanoparticles into sensors

    David Scott-Melbourne
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:16 am
    Scientists have figured out the optimal gap needed between two gold nanoparticles to turn them into optical antennae. When the gap is optimal, the particles can concentrate light shining on them into the tiny regions between the gap. Researchers can use the light to sense molecules inside the space. Related Articles On FuturityRice UniversityAfter trauma, nano-drug fights blood toxinsRice UniversityTowers of nanotubes sprout from graphenePurdue UniversityNanotubes can harm beneficial soil microbesRice UniversityLight up graphene for circuits on demandUniversity of California, Santa…
  • Scientists are skeptical of ‘brain games’ for older adults

    Clifton B. Parker-Stanford
    22 Oct 2014 | 10:56 am
    Nearly 70 scientists have issued a statement saying they’re skeptical about claims that computer-based “brain games” actually help older adults sharpen their mental powers. Laura Carstensen, a Stanford University psychology professor and the director of the Center for Longevity, says that as baby boomers enter their golden years, commercial companies are all too often promising quick fixes for cognition problems through products that are unlikely to produce broad improvements in everyday functioning. “It is customary for advertising to highlight the benefits and…
  • Feathers have ‘custom’ shafts for flight

    Caroline Bird-Queensland
    22 Oct 2014 | 10:44 am
    The shafts of feathers are made of a multi-layered fibrous composite material—a lot like carbon fiber—that lets the feather bend and twist in flight. Since their appearance more than 150 million years ago, feather shafts (rachises) have evolved to be some of the lightest, strongest, and most fatigue-resistant natural structures. However, relatively little work has been done on their morphology, especially from a mechanical perspective, and never at the nanoscale. Related Articles On FuturityNo single cause for Ice Age extinctionsPrinceton UniversityNo explosion of skeletal animalsMichigan…
  • How black holes stop galaxies from making stars

    Dennis O'Shea-JHU
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:09 pm
    New evidence could help explain how some massive black holes shut down a galaxy’s ability to make new stars. Astronomers say jets of “radio-frequency feedback” streaming from mature galaxies’ central black holes are the “off switch,” preventing hot free gas from cooling and collapsing into baby stars. “Basically, these active black holes give a reason for why stars stop forming in the universe.” “When you look into the past history of the universe, you see these galaxies building stars,” says Tobias Marriage, assistant professor…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Society and Culture

  • Not all scientists are great at sharing

    Layne Cameron-Michigan State
    22 Oct 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Astronomers and geneticists are good at sharing, report researchers, who say ecologists may need a brush-up on the concept. A study in the current issue of Bioscience explores the paradox that although ecologists share findings via scientific journals, they do not share the data on which the studies are built, says Patricia Soranno, a fisheries and wildlife professor at Michigan State University and coauthor of the paper. “One reason for not sharing data is the fear of being scooped by another scientist; but if all data are available, then everyone is on the same playing field, there…
  • Overweight women less likely to work with public

    Amy Wolf-Vanderbilt
    22 Oct 2014 | 6:53 am
    Overweight women are more likely to work in lower-paying and more physically demanding jobs, according to a new study. They are also less likely to get higher-wage positions that include interaction with the public, and make less money in either case compared to average-size women and all men. Related Articles On FuturityNorthwestern UniversityReligion diet may make you obeseMichigan State UniversitySmartphone night owls more sleepy at workUniversity of VirginiaOnline shoppers more likely to buy from white sellersNew York UniversityWorkplace design can cut nurse turnoverUniversity of…
  • Do cadavers make the best anatomy teachers?

    Andy Henion-Michigan State
    17 Oct 2014 | 5:46 am
    Computer simulations are an increasingly popular way to teach anatomy in college, but students learn better with human cadavers, according to new research. Cary Roseth, associate professor of educational psychology at Michigan State University, says the study suggests cadaver-based instruction should continue in undergraduate human anatomy, a gateway course to medical school, nursing, and other health and medical fields. Related Articles On FuturityCarnegie Mellon UniversityTo put info together, work with others onlineMichigan State UniversityBrain anatomy separates Asperger's from learning…
  • What to do when you work with a bully

    Angie Hunt-Iowa State
    15 Oct 2014 | 12:37 pm
    Approximately 54 million workers, or 35 percent of employees in the United States, report being the target of a bully at some point in their career, according to a new report. No one expects to go to work and feel as though they are back on the school playground, but bullying is all too common for many workers. And much of the bullying goes unreported. Related Articles On FuturityDuke UniversityGlobal get-together: It's time to talkUniversity of Colorado at BoulderAutonomy sparks on-the-job passionPenn StatePatients are safer when nurses ‘fess up’University of PittsburghCoal-mining…
  • Politicians look better if they’re on your side

    Melissa Osgood-Cornell
    15 Oct 2014 | 8:33 am
    Do you think President Obama is more attractive than John Boehner? What about Nancy Pelosi and Sarah Palin? If you find your candidate for political office more attractive than the opponent, you’re not alone, according to new research. Related Articles On FuturityRice UniversityAre conservatives 'hardwired' to perceive threats?Georgia Institute of TechnologyTo vote, injured vets need better accessPrinceton UniversityTax hikes don’t send millionaires packingVanderbilt UniversityAre protests in Brazil just the beginning?Monash UniversityScience suggests that size does matterUniversity…
 
Log in