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  • Breastfeeding past 2 months lowers obesity risk

    Futurity » Health and Medicine
    H. Roger Segelken-Cornell
    19 Dec 2014 | 12:07 pm
    Infants at risk for childhood and adult obesity have a better chance of not becoming overweight if they breastfeed longer than two months. “Children at the highest risk for rising weight gain patterns in infancy appear to benefit the most from longer breastfeeding duration,” says Stacy J. Carling, a doctoral student in nutritional sciences at Cornell University. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of RochesterObesity in pregnancy doesn't stunt baby's growthUniversity of California, DavisBaby formula may have long-term effect on healthJohns Hopkins UniversityMom's PCB exposure…
  • ‘Ripple effect’ as fish opt for cooler water?

    Futurity » Earth and Environment
    Ken Branson-Rutgers
    19 Dec 2014 | 8:41 am
    Increasing temperatures are pushing fish and crustaceans north in search of cooler waters along the east and west coasts of North America. The shift could have an effect on birds, marine mammals, and those who depend on fishing for food and income. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of California, DavisHow dead orcas can keep others aliveUniversity of VirginiaSaving seagrass could bury more carbonStanford UniversityEco-disaster: Reserves help oceans recoverNo single cause for Ice Age extinctionsUniversity of MichiganAre big algae blooms Lake Erie's new normal?Duke UniversityHotter nights…
  • Brain waves predict which kids will share

    Futurity » Science and Technology
    Jann Ingmire-Chicago
    19 Dec 2014 | 10:18 am
    Specific brain markers predict generosity in children, report developmental neuroscientists. Those neural markers appear to be linked to both social and moral evaluation processes. Although young children are natural helpers, their perspective on sharing resources tends to be selfish. Jean Decety, professor of psychology and psychiatry at the University of Chicago, and Jason Cowell, a postdoctoral scholar in Decety’s lab, wanted to find out how young children’s brains evaluate whether to share something with others out of generosity. In this study, generosity was used as a proxy…
  • 64% of gun deaths in U.S. are suicides

    Futurity » Society and Culture
    Carole Gan-UC Davis
    18 Dec 2014 | 6:58 am
    The overall death rate from gun violence has remained unchanged in the United States for more than a decade, but suicides by firearms are now more common than homicides, a new study shows. In 2012, nearly two-thirds, or 64 percent, of deaths from firearm violence were suicides, compared to 57 percent of deaths in 2006. The growth in suicide is especially prominent among white males beginning in early adulthood. Related Articles On FuturityCalifornia Institute of TechnologyNicotine’s secrets could speed up psych drugsMichigan State UniversityHow to keep women on parole out of…
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  • Breastfeeding past 2 months lowers obesity risk

    H. Roger Segelken-Cornell
    19 Dec 2014 | 12:07 pm
    Infants at risk for childhood and adult obesity have a better chance of not becoming overweight if they breastfeed longer than two months. “Children at the highest risk for rising weight gain patterns in infancy appear to benefit the most from longer breastfeeding duration,” says Stacy J. Carling, a doctoral student in nutritional sciences at Cornell University. Related Articles On FuturityPurdue UniversityWhy babies wobble, but don't fall downUniversity of WashingtonTo mimic us, babies use 'body map' in brainJohns Hopkins UniversityBlood test could predict postpartum depression…
  • How pride could hint at mood disorders

    Yasmin Anwar-UC Berkeley
    19 Dec 2014 | 11:33 am
    Inflated or deflated feelings of self-worth may be connected to mood disorders, such as bipolar disorder, narcissistic personality disorder, anxiety, and depression, report researchers. “We found that it is important to consider the motivation to pursue power, beliefs about how much power one has attained, pro-social and aggressive strategies for attaining power, and emotions related to attaining power,” says senior author Sheri Johnson, psychologist at University of California, Berkeley. Related Articles On FuturityStanford UniversityDepressed people's body clocks 'out of…
  • Brain waves predict which kids will share

    Jann Ingmire-Chicago
    19 Dec 2014 | 10:18 am
    Specific brain markers predict generosity in children, report developmental neuroscientists. Those neural markers appear to be linked to both social and moral evaluation processes. Although young children are natural helpers, their perspective on sharing resources tends to be selfish. Jean Decety, professor of psychology and psychiatry at the University of Chicago, and Jason Cowell, a postdoctoral scholar in Decety’s lab, wanted to find out how young children’s brains evaluate whether to share something with others out of generosity. In this study, generosity was used as a proxy…
  • ‘Ripple effect’ as fish opt for cooler water?

    Ken Branson-Rutgers
    19 Dec 2014 | 8:41 am
    Increasing temperatures are pushing fish and crustaceans north in search of cooler waters along the east and west coasts of North America. The shift could have an effect on birds, marine mammals, and those who depend on fishing for food and income. Related Articles On FuturityGeorgia Institute of TechnologyFish in acidic water less able to smell predatorsUniversity of FloridaLoss of elephants (and their poop) devastates forestsPrinceton UniversityTo stay in familiar waters, fish keep moving For example, lobsters that were once abundant off Long Island have moved to cooler waters of Maine…
  • Birds knew to flee before tornado hit

    Sarah Yang-Berkeley
    19 Dec 2014 | 8:13 am
    While tracking a population of golden-winged warblers, scientists discovered that birds in the mountains of eastern Tennessee fled their breeding grounds one to two days before powerful supercell storms arrived. The storm system swept through the central and southern United States in late April 2014, generating 84 confirmed tornadoes and killing 35 people. “It is the first time we’ve documented this type of storm avoidance behavior in birds during breeding season,” says ecologist Henry Streby, who conducted the work while he was a National Science Foundation postdoctoral…
 
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    Futurity » Earth and Environment

  • ‘Ripple effect’ as fish opt for cooler water?

    Ken Branson-Rutgers
    19 Dec 2014 | 8:41 am
    Increasing temperatures are pushing fish and crustaceans north in search of cooler waters along the east and west coasts of North America. The shift could have an effect on birds, marine mammals, and those who depend on fishing for food and income. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of California, DavisHow dead orcas can keep others aliveUniversity of VirginiaSaving seagrass could bury more carbonStanford UniversityEco-disaster: Reserves help oceans recoverNo single cause for Ice Age extinctionsUniversity of MichiganAre big algae blooms Lake Erie's new normal?Duke UniversityHotter nights…
  • Birds knew to flee before tornado hit

    Sarah Yang-Berkeley
    19 Dec 2014 | 8:13 am
    While tracking a population of golden-winged warblers, scientists discovered that birds in the mountains of eastern Tennessee fled their breeding grounds one to two days before powerful supercell storms arrived. The storm system swept through the central and southern United States in late April 2014, generating 84 confirmed tornadoes and killing 35 people. “It is the first time we’ve documented this type of storm avoidance behavior in birds during breeding season,” says ecologist Henry Streby, who conducted the work while he was a National Science Foundation postdoctoral…
  • Glacier beds get slippery when ice slides fast

    Mike Krapfl-Iowa State
    18 Dec 2014 | 8:03 am
    As a glacier’s sliding speed increases, the bed beneath the glacier can grow slipperier, laboratory simulations show. Researchers say including this effect in efforts to calculate future increases in glacier speeds could improve predictions of ice volume lost to the oceans and the rate of sea-level rise. Lucas Zoet, a postdoctoral research associate, and Neal Iverson, a professor of geological and atmospheric sciences, at Iowa State University describe the results of their experiments in the Journal of Glaciology. The researchers used a newly constructed sliding simulator device to…
  • New ‘sponges’ capture carbon in a powder

    Anne Ju-Cornell
    17 Dec 2014 | 11:52 am
    Carbon capture—chemically trapping carbon dioxide before it ends up in the atmosphere—is gaining momentum in the fight against global warming. The standard methods, though, are plagued with toxicity, corrosiveness, and inefficiency. Now, materials scientists have invented low-toxicity, highly effective carbon-trapping “sponges” that could make the technology more popular. Above left, a scanning electron microscopy image shows a pristine silica support before the amine is added. Above right, the amine sorbent. (Credit: Genggeng Qi) A research team has invented a powder that…
  • Hurricanes to leave these 10 U.S. cities in the dark

    Jill Rosen-Johns Hopkins
    16 Dec 2014 | 6:23 am
    More intense future hurricanes powered by warming global temperatures will significantly increase power blackouts for some major US cities, researchers predict. Engineers created a new computer model to analyze the future vulnerability of power grids on or relatively near the Gulf and Atlantic coastlines. The findings should help metropolitan areas better plan for global warming. A list of the Atlantic and Gulf coastal region cities whose power grids are most vulnerable to increased hurricane damage because of climate change. (Credit: Johns Hopkins University) Related Articles On…
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    Futurity » Health and Medicine

  • Breastfeeding past 2 months lowers obesity risk

    H. Roger Segelken-Cornell
    19 Dec 2014 | 12:07 pm
    Infants at risk for childhood and adult obesity have a better chance of not becoming overweight if they breastfeed longer than two months. “Children at the highest risk for rising weight gain patterns in infancy appear to benefit the most from longer breastfeeding duration,” says Stacy J. Carling, a doctoral student in nutritional sciences at Cornell University. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of RochesterObesity in pregnancy doesn't stunt baby's growthUniversity of California, DavisBaby formula may have long-term effect on healthJohns Hopkins UniversityMom's PCB exposure…
  • How pride could hint at mood disorders

    Yasmin Anwar-UC Berkeley
    19 Dec 2014 | 11:33 am
    Inflated or deflated feelings of self-worth may be connected to mood disorders, such as bipolar disorder, narcissistic personality disorder, anxiety, and depression, report researchers. “We found that it is important to consider the motivation to pursue power, beliefs about how much power one has attained, pro-social and aggressive strategies for attaining power, and emotions related to attaining power,” says senior author Sheri Johnson, psychologist at University of California, Berkeley. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of PennsylvaniaMouse brains differ if dad was stressed…
  • Will ‘capture and culture’ personalize cancer therapy?

    Gabe Cherry-Michigan
    19 Dec 2014 | 7:27 am
    A new way to grow a certain type of cancer cell from a patient outside the body could lead to a deeper understanding of cancer and better early-stage treatment of the disease. Researchers say the new technique is a major step forward in the study of circulating tumor cells, which are shed from tumors and circulate through the blood of cancer patients. These are the cells that are thought to cause metastasis, the spread of cancer through the body that’s responsible for nearly 90 percent of cancer-related deaths. The cells also hold valuable genetic information that could lead doctors to…
  • Thoughts make robot hand pinch and scoop

    Anita Srikameswaran-Pittsburgh
    19 Dec 2014 | 5:32 am
    A woman with quadriplegia was able to manipulate a robot hand into four positions using just her thoughts to successfully pick up big and small boxes, a ball, an oddly shaped rock, and fat and skinny tubes. The findings describe, for the first time, 10-degree brain control of a prosthetic device, in which the woman was able to maneuver the hand into four positions: fingers spread, scoop, pinch, and thumbs up. Four of the gestures possible with the robotic hand, clockwise from top left: scoop, opposition, spread, and pinch. (Credit: Journal of Neural Engineering/IOP Publishing) Related…
  • Zooming in on cilia can detect mutations

    Leah Burrows-Brandeis
    18 Dec 2014 | 1:02 pm
    A deep breath sucks in dust, dirt, pollen, bacteria, and probably more than a few dust mites. Cilia, the cell’s tails and antennas, are among the most important biological structures. They line our windpipes and sweep away all the junk we inhale. They help us see, smell, and reproduce. When a mutation disrupts the function or structure of cilia, the effects on the human body are devastating and sometimes lethal. Related Articles On FuturityStanford UniversityThis pen-size microscope spots cancer 'seeds' in bloodEmory UniversityEpilepsy model points out affected neuronsUniversity of…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Science and Technology

  • Brain waves predict which kids will share

    Jann Ingmire-Chicago
    19 Dec 2014 | 10:18 am
    Specific brain markers predict generosity in children, report developmental neuroscientists. Those neural markers appear to be linked to both social and moral evaluation processes. Although young children are natural helpers, their perspective on sharing resources tends to be selfish. Jean Decety, professor of psychology and psychiatry at the University of Chicago, and Jason Cowell, a postdoctoral scholar in Decety’s lab, wanted to find out how young children’s brains evaluate whether to share something with others out of generosity. In this study, generosity was used as a proxy…
  • Birds knew to flee before tornado hit

    Sarah Yang-Berkeley
    19 Dec 2014 | 8:13 am
    While tracking a population of golden-winged warblers, scientists discovered that birds in the mountains of eastern Tennessee fled their breeding grounds one to two days before powerful supercell storms arrived. The storm system swept through the central and southern United States in late April 2014, generating 84 confirmed tornadoes and killing 35 people. “It is the first time we’ve documented this type of storm avoidance behavior in birds during breeding season,” says ecologist Henry Streby, who conducted the work while he was a National Science Foundation postdoctoral…
  • You pick the names for 5 craters on Mercury

    Paulette Campbell-Johns Hopkins
    19 Dec 2014 | 7:15 am
    The team behind NASA’s Messenger mission is looking for your help: they need names for five newly discovered craters on Mercury. If you’re a citizen of the Earth, you’re eligible to enter the contest. The entry deadline is January 15. Messenger, built and operated for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, launched in 2004 and—nearly seven years later—became the first human spacecraft to enter orbit around Mercury. Its original one-year science mission to investigate the planet has been extended twice. Messenger is expected to drop out of orbit…
  • Thoughts make robot hand pinch and scoop

    Anita Srikameswaran-Pittsburgh
    19 Dec 2014 | 5:32 am
    A woman with quadriplegia was able to manipulate a robot hand into four positions using just her thoughts to successfully pick up big and small boxes, a ball, an oddly shaped rock, and fat and skinny tubes. The findings describe, for the first time, 10-degree brain control of a prosthetic device, in which the woman was able to maneuver the hand into four positions: fingers spread, scoop, pinch, and thumbs up. Four of the gestures possible with the robotic hand, clockwise from top left: scoop, opposition, spread, and pinch. (Credit: Journal of Neural Engineering/IOP Publishing) Related…
  • ‘High-rise’ chip could shrink supercomputers

    Tom Abate-Stanford
    18 Dec 2014 | 12:39 pm
    At a conference in San Francisco, a Stanford University team revealed how to build high-rise chips that could leapfrog the performance of the single-story logic and memory chips on today’s circuit cards. Those circuit cards are like busy cities in which logic chips compute and memory chips store data. But when the computer gets busy, the wires connecting logic and memory can get jammed. Engineers have created a four-layer prototype high-rise chip. In this representation, the bottom and top layers are logic transistors. Sandwiched between them are two layers of memory. The vertical tubes…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Futurity » Society and Culture

  • 64% of gun deaths in U.S. are suicides

    Carole Gan-UC Davis
    18 Dec 2014 | 6:58 am
    The overall death rate from gun violence has remained unchanged in the United States for more than a decade, but suicides by firearms are now more common than homicides, a new study shows. In 2012, nearly two-thirds, or 64 percent, of deaths from firearm violence were suicides, compared to 57 percent of deaths in 2006. The growth in suicide is especially prominent among white males beginning in early adulthood. Related Articles On FuturityCalifornia Institute of TechnologyNicotine’s secrets could speed up psych drugsMichigan State UniversityHow to keep women on parole out of…
  • How to track the ‘footprint’ of fashion influence

    Matthew Swayne-Penn State
    18 Dec 2014 | 6:30 am
    Analyzing relevant words and phrases from fashion reviews makes it possible to identify a network of influence among major designers, say researchers. This work also lets them track how those style trends moved through the industry,” says Heng Xu, associate professor of information sciences and technology at Penn State. “Data analytics, which is the idea that large amounts of data are becoming more available for finding patterns, establishing correlations, and identifying emerging trends, is very hot these days and it is being applied to many industries and fields—from health…
  • Culture shapes how it feels to be spiritual

    Clifton B. Parker-Stanford
    17 Dec 2014 | 8:25 am
    Culture has an impact on how people experience spirituality, say researchers who interviewed evangelical Christians and Thai Buddhists. Christians might “kindle” or generate different kinds of spiritual experiences than Buddhists because their cultural understandings of these mental or bodily sensations are different, says Tanya Luhrmann, an anthropology professor at Stanford University and a coauthor of a new article in Current Anthropology. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of California, DavisReligion can shift what companies shareUniversity of ChicagoGod endures, even…
  • How too many gifts can cause kids trouble

    Christian Basi-Missouri
    17 Dec 2014 | 7:27 am
    Parents tempted to buy their kids every gift on their wish list this holiday season should think again. A new study finds that using material goods as a parenting technique may set children up for trouble when they’re adults. “Our research suggests that children who receive many material rewards from their parents will likely continue rewarding themselves with material goods when they are grown—well into adulthood—and this could be problematic,” says Marsha Richins, professor of marketing at University of Missouri. “Our research highlights the value of examining…
  • These games may improve psychopath behavior

    Bill Hathaway-Yale
    17 Dec 2014 | 7:21 am
    People with psychopathy tend not to feel fear, consider the emotions of others, or reflect on their behavior—and these traits make them notoriously difficult to treat. A new study to appear in Clinical Psychological Science suggests it may be possible to teach psychopaths to consider emotion and other pieces of information when they make decisions. The results could form the basis of treatment for this group of dangerous prisoners—7 of 10 of whom go on to commit new crimes after being released. Related Articles On FuturityDuke UniversityMoral outrage can kill your thirstUniversity of…
 
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