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  • Not all scientists are great at sharing

    Futurity
    Layne Cameron-Michigan State
    22 Oct 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Astronomers and geneticists are good at sharing, report researchers, who say ecologists may need a brush-up on the concept. A study in the current issue of Bioscience explores the paradox that although ecologists share findings via scientific journals, they do not share the data on which the studies are built, says Patricia Soranno, a fisheries and wildlife professor at Michigan State University and coauthor of the paper. “One reason for not sharing data is the fear of being scooped by another scientist; but if all data are available, then everyone is on the same playing field, there…
  • Not all scientists are great at sharing

    Futurity » Earth and Environment
    Layne Cameron-Michigan State
    22 Oct 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Astronomers and geneticists are good at sharing, report researchers, who say ecologists may need a brush-up on the concept. A study in the current issue of Bioscience explores the paradox that although ecologists share findings via scientific journals, they do not share the data on which the studies are built, says Patricia Soranno, a fisheries and wildlife professor at Michigan State University and coauthor of the paper. “One reason for not sharing data is the fear of being scooped by another scientist; but if all data are available, then everyone is on the same playing field, there…
  • When hospitals merge, patients often pay the price

    Futurity » Health and Medicine
    Sarah Yang-Berkeley
    22 Oct 2014 | 1:05 pm
    While more and more US hospitals are consolidating medical groups and physician practices to be more efficient, a new study finds the practice often backfires and increases the cost of patient care. “This consolidation is meant to better coordinate care and to have a stronger bargaining position with insurance plans,” says lead author James Robinson, professor and head of health policy and management at University of California, Berkeley’s School of Public Health. “The movement also aligns with the goals of the Affordable Care Act, since physicians and hospitals…
  • Scientists are skeptical of ‘brain games’ for older adults

    Futurity » Science and Technology
    Clifton B. Parker-Stanford
    22 Oct 2014 | 10:56 am
    Nearly 70 scientists have issued a statement saying they’re skeptical about claims that computer-based “brain games” actually help older adults sharpen their mental powers. Laura Carstensen, a Stanford University psychology professor and the director of the Center for Longevity, says that as baby boomers enter their golden years, commercial companies are all too often promising quick fixes for cognition problems through products that are unlikely to produce broad improvements in everyday functioning. “It is customary for advertising to highlight the benefits and…
  • Not all scientists are great at sharing

    Futurity » Society and Culture
    Layne Cameron-Michigan State
    22 Oct 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Astronomers and geneticists are good at sharing, report researchers, who say ecologists may need a brush-up on the concept. A study in the current issue of Bioscience explores the paradox that although ecologists share findings via scientific journals, they do not share the data on which the studies are built, says Patricia Soranno, a fisheries and wildlife professor at Michigan State University and coauthor of the paper. “One reason for not sharing data is the fear of being scooped by another scientist; but if all data are available, then everyone is on the same playing field, there…
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    Futurity

  • Not all scientists are great at sharing

    Layne Cameron-Michigan State
    22 Oct 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Astronomers and geneticists are good at sharing, report researchers, who say ecologists may need a brush-up on the concept. A study in the current issue of Bioscience explores the paradox that although ecologists share findings via scientific journals, they do not share the data on which the studies are built, says Patricia Soranno, a fisheries and wildlife professor at Michigan State University and coauthor of the paper. “One reason for not sharing data is the fear of being scooped by another scientist; but if all data are available, then everyone is on the same playing field, there…
  • When hospitals merge, patients often pay the price

    Sarah Yang-Berkeley
    22 Oct 2014 | 1:05 pm
    While more and more US hospitals are consolidating medical groups and physician practices to be more efficient, a new study finds the practice often backfires and increases the cost of patient care. “This consolidation is meant to better coordinate care and to have a stronger bargaining position with insurance plans,” says lead author James Robinson, professor and head of health policy and management at University of California, Berkeley’s School of Public Health. “The movement also aligns with the goals of the Affordable Care Act, since physicians and hospitals…
  • Does toxic air raise a child’s risk for autism?

    Allison Hydzik-Pittsburgh
    22 Oct 2014 | 11:22 am
    Children exposed to certain types of air pollution during pregnancy and early in life are more likely to develop autism, according to a study of families living in Pennsylvania. “Autism spectrum disorders are a major public health problem, and their prevalence has increased dramatically,” says Evelyn Talbott, professor of epidemiology at University of Pittsburgh Public Health. “Despite its serious social impact, the causes of autism are poorly understood. Very few studies of autism have included environmental exposures while taking into account other personal and behavioral…
  • Scientists are skeptical of ‘brain games’ for older adults

    Clifton B. Parker-Stanford
    22 Oct 2014 | 10:56 am
    Nearly 70 scientists have issued a statement saying they’re skeptical about claims that computer-based “brain games” actually help older adults sharpen their mental powers. Laura Carstensen, a Stanford University psychology professor and the director of the Center for Longevity, says that as baby boomers enter their golden years, commercial companies are all too often promising quick fixes for cognition problems through products that are unlikely to produce broad improvements in everyday functioning. “It is customary for advertising to highlight the benefits and…
  • Feathers have ‘custom’ shafts for flight

    Caroline Bird-Queensland
    22 Oct 2014 | 10:44 am
    The shafts of feathers are made of a multi-layered fibrous composite material—a lot like carbon fiber—that lets the feather bend and twist in flight. Since their appearance more than 150 million years ago, feather shafts (rachises) have evolved to be some of the lightest, strongest, and most fatigue-resistant natural structures. However, relatively little work has been done on their morphology, especially from a mechanical perspective, and never at the nanoscale. Related Articles On FuturityYale University'Invasion' moved mammals from egg to wombUniversity of KansasAlfred Hitchcock meets…
 
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    Futurity » Earth and Environment

  • Not all scientists are great at sharing

    Layne Cameron-Michigan State
    22 Oct 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Astronomers and geneticists are good at sharing, report researchers, who say ecologists may need a brush-up on the concept. A study in the current issue of Bioscience explores the paradox that although ecologists share findings via scientific journals, they do not share the data on which the studies are built, says Patricia Soranno, a fisheries and wildlife professor at Michigan State University and coauthor of the paper. “One reason for not sharing data is the fear of being scooped by another scientist; but if all data are available, then everyone is on the same playing field, there…
  • Terrified prey change where plants grow in savannas

    Gigi Marino-Florida
    17 Oct 2014 | 9:46 am
    The classic food chain on the savanna may be more complicated than prey eats plants and predator eats prey. Researchers conducted fieldwork at the Mpala Research Centre in Laikipia, Kenya, 100 kilometers north of the equator in a savanna. “Where the prey do and do not go, it turns out, strongly influences the types of plants you find in these habitats.” The team looked at three components of the ecosystem: the predators, including leopards and wild dogs; the leaf-eating impala; and two species of acacia trees, one defended by more thorns than the other. “We’d like to…
  • Diving birds at risk without fish for dinner

    Kat Kerlin-UC Davis
    17 Oct 2014 | 7:57 am
    Diving birds that winter in the Salish Sea (between British Columbia and Washington) were 11 times more likely to be in decline than non-diving birds, a new study finds. Also, populations of diving birds that rely on forage fish, such as Pacific herring, are 16 times more likely to decline than those with more varied diets. The study lends credence to what scientists have long suspected: “If you want to recover birds, you need to recover the food that they’re eating,” says coauthor Joe Gaydos, a wildlife veterinarian at School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of…
  • Alpine butterflies survived by working their ‘net’

    Kat Kerlin-UC Davis
    17 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    Good connections helped alpine butterflies survive a serious population crash in 2003 that killed off more than 60 percent of the population. The alpine butterfly lives in high-altitude meadows of the Rocky Mountains. A new study focused on a network of them living along three ridge tops in Alberta, Canada. Related Articles On FuturityCornell UniversityNative bees: More bee for the buckCase Western Reserve UniversityHow protein 'nanopistons' unwind RNABrandeis UniversityOur body's gene-snipping machine is like a TransformerIowa State UniversityAphids put out welcome mat for other…
  • This fusion reactor could be cheaper than coal

    Michelle Ma-Washington
    16 Oct 2014 | 11:59 am
    Fusion energy almost sounds too good to be true—zero greenhouse gas emissions, no long-lived radioactive waste, a nearly unlimited fuel supply. Perhaps the biggest roadblock to adopting fusion energy is that the economics haven’t penciled out. Fusion power designs aren’t cheap enough to outperform systems that use fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas. University of Washington engineers hope to change that. They have designed a concept for a fusion reactor that, when scaled up to the size of a large electrical power plant, would rival costs for a new coal-fired plant with…
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    Futurity » Health and Medicine

  • When hospitals merge, patients often pay the price

    Sarah Yang-Berkeley
    22 Oct 2014 | 1:05 pm
    While more and more US hospitals are consolidating medical groups and physician practices to be more efficient, a new study finds the practice often backfires and increases the cost of patient care. “This consolidation is meant to better coordinate care and to have a stronger bargaining position with insurance plans,” says lead author James Robinson, professor and head of health policy and management at University of California, Berkeley’s School of Public Health. “The movement also aligns with the goals of the Affordable Care Act, since physicians and hospitals…
  • Does toxic air raise a child’s risk for autism?

    Allison Hydzik-Pittsburgh
    22 Oct 2014 | 11:22 am
    Children exposed to certain types of air pollution during pregnancy and early in life are more likely to develop autism, according to a study of families living in Pennsylvania. “Autism spectrum disorders are a major public health problem, and their prevalence has increased dramatically,” says Evelyn Talbott, professor of epidemiology at University of Pittsburgh Public Health. “Despite its serious social impact, the causes of autism are poorly understood. Very few studies of autism have included environmental exposures while taking into account other personal and behavioral…
  • Scientists are skeptical of ‘brain games’ for older adults

    Clifton B. Parker-Stanford
    22 Oct 2014 | 10:56 am
    Nearly 70 scientists have issued a statement saying they’re skeptical about claims that computer-based “brain games” actually help older adults sharpen their mental powers. Laura Carstensen, a Stanford University psychology professor and the director of the Center for Longevity, says that as baby boomers enter their golden years, commercial companies are all too often promising quick fixes for cognition problems through products that are unlikely to produce broad improvements in everyday functioning. “It is customary for advertising to highlight the benefits and…
  • Teens who eat a hearty breakfast skip the snacks

    Jesslyn Chew-Missouri
    22 Oct 2014 | 9:17 am
    Teenagers who eat breakfast, particularly one high in protein, are less likely to crave junk food later, and scientists say a boost in the brain chemical dopamine may help explain why. In contrast, teens who skip breakfast are more inclined to overeat later and have a greater risk of becoming overweight. Related Articles On FuturityDuke UniversityFor healthy guts, breast milk beats formulaMoms exposed to common PFCs have heavier totsPenn StatePaying the price for locally grownYale UniversityAnti-obesity messages: stigma or support? Vanderbilt UniversityCarbs for mom tied to respiratory virus…
  • The plague hitches a ride to travel the body

    Karen Loh-NUS
    22 Oct 2014 | 6:44 am
    An ancient scourge is giving scientists new insights on how the body responds to infections. In the journal Immunity, researchers show how the Yersinia pestis bacteria that cause bubonic plague hitchhike on immune cells in the lymph nodes and eventually ride into the lungs and the blood stream, where the infection is easily transmitted to others. The insight provides a new avenue to develop therapies that block this host immune function rather than target the pathogens themselves—a tactic that often leads to antibiotic resistance. “The recent Ebola outbreak has shown how highly…
 
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    Futurity » Science and Technology

  • Scientists are skeptical of ‘brain games’ for older adults

    Clifton B. Parker-Stanford
    22 Oct 2014 | 10:56 am
    Nearly 70 scientists have issued a statement saying they’re skeptical about claims that computer-based “brain games” actually help older adults sharpen their mental powers. Laura Carstensen, a Stanford University psychology professor and the director of the Center for Longevity, says that as baby boomers enter their golden years, commercial companies are all too often promising quick fixes for cognition problems through products that are unlikely to produce broad improvements in everyday functioning. “It is customary for advertising to highlight the benefits and…
  • Feathers have ‘custom’ shafts for flight

    Caroline Bird-Queensland
    22 Oct 2014 | 10:44 am
    The shafts of feathers are made of a multi-layered fibrous composite material—a lot like carbon fiber—that lets the feather bend and twist in flight. Since their appearance more than 150 million years ago, feather shafts (rachises) have evolved to be some of the lightest, strongest, and most fatigue-resistant natural structures. However, relatively little work has been done on their morphology, especially from a mechanical perspective, and never at the nanoscale. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of FloridaSaber-tooth cat was a Florida nativePenn StateOil and gas 'footprints' disturb…
  • How black holes stop galaxies from making stars

    Dennis O'Shea-JHU
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:09 pm
    New evidence could help explain how some massive black holes shut down a galaxy’s ability to make new stars. Astronomers say jets of “radio-frequency feedback” streaming from mature galaxies’ central black holes are the “off switch,” preventing hot free gas from cooling and collapsing into baby stars. “Basically, these active black holes give a reason for why stars stop forming in the universe.” “When you look into the past history of the universe, you see these galaxies building stars,” says Tobias Marriage, assistant professor…
  • Rest your mind the right way to boost learning

    Marc Airhart-Texas
    21 Oct 2014 | 12:38 pm
    Scientists have previously found that resting the mind, such as daydreaming, helps strengthen memories of events and retention of information. Now, research shows that the right kind of mental rest, which strengthens and consolidates memories from recent learning, may boost later learning. At the University of Texas at Austin, graduate student research Margaret Schlichting and associate professor of psychology and neuroscience Alison Preston gave participants in the study two learning tasks in which participants were asked to memorize different series of associated photo pairs. Related…
  • Milk fat detector uses fluorescent dye

    Karen Loh-NUS
    21 Oct 2014 | 10:07 am
    Scientists are building a fluorescent sensor that can rapidly identify the presence of fat in milk. The device, called “Milk Orange,” could one day be useful to milk producers in developing countries. The system under development will detect fat in milk by using the sensor to work like a digital thermometer, according to the team led by Professor Chang Young-Tae of the National University of Singapore. Fat content in milk is associated with the levels of protein and vitamins, thus has direct correlation with the nutritional and marketing value of milk. Related Articles On…
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    Futurity » Society and Culture

  • Not all scientists are great at sharing

    Layne Cameron-Michigan State
    22 Oct 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Astronomers and geneticists are good at sharing, report researchers, who say ecologists may need a brush-up on the concept. A study in the current issue of Bioscience explores the paradox that although ecologists share findings via scientific journals, they do not share the data on which the studies are built, says Patricia Soranno, a fisheries and wildlife professor at Michigan State University and coauthor of the paper. “One reason for not sharing data is the fear of being scooped by another scientist; but if all data are available, then everyone is on the same playing field, there…
  • Overweight women less likely to work with public

    Amy Wolf-Vanderbilt
    22 Oct 2014 | 6:53 am
    Overweight women are more likely to work in lower-paying and more physically demanding jobs, according to a new study. They are also less likely to get higher-wage positions that include interaction with the public, and make less money in either case compared to average-size women and all men. Related Articles On FuturityMonash UniversityTo beat food temptations, stick to a listUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillFast foodies cut back when prices go upBrown UniversityPhD effect: Low blood pressure for yearsUniversity of Rochester'Macho' receptor slows wound healingUniversity of North…
  • Do cadavers make the best anatomy teachers?

    Andy Henion-Michigan State
    17 Oct 2014 | 5:46 am
    Computer simulations are an increasingly popular way to teach anatomy in college, but students learn better with human cadavers, according to new research. Cary Roseth, associate professor of educational psychology at Michigan State University, says the study suggests cadaver-based instruction should continue in undergraduate human anatomy, a gateway course to medical school, nursing, and other health and medical fields. Related Articles On FuturityCarnegie Mellon UniversityKids learn less in classrooms with too many decorationsCalifornia Institute of TechnologySimulations reveal signature of…
  • What to do when you work with a bully

    Angie Hunt-Iowa State
    15 Oct 2014 | 12:37 pm
    Approximately 54 million workers, or 35 percent of employees in the United States, report being the target of a bully at some point in their career, according to a new report. No one expects to go to work and feel as though they are back on the school playground, but bullying is all too common for many workers. And much of the bullying goes unreported. Related Articles On FuturityIndiana UniversityAll credit ratings not created equalMonash UniversityWomen welcome chance to negotiate salaryCornell UniversityHealthy snacks don't hurt booster club profitsStanford UniversityMedieval business was…
  • Politicians look better if they’re on your side

    Melissa Osgood-Cornell
    15 Oct 2014 | 8:33 am
    Do you think President Obama is more attractive than John Boehner? What about Nancy Pelosi and Sarah Palin? If you find your candidate for political office more attractive than the opponent, you’re not alone, according to new research. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of MichiganTreating sleep apnea makes people look youngerRice UniversityWomen dubbed 'Twitterati' of Arab SpringJohns Hopkins UniversityWashington insiders are whiter and well-paidIndiana UniversityAfter recession, US parties split on government rescueUniversity of PennsylvaniaDid women and slaves drive Dixie…
 
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